Author Topic: Grammar nazi  (Read 123509 times)

johnny847

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3199
    • My Blog
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #250 on: March 29, 2015, 01:03:01 PM »

My personal noun to verb "favorite" is when people use "office" as a verb: "I office from home two days per week."

My hand involuntarily curls into a face-punching fist whenever I hear that.

My "favorite" is when "gift" is used as a verb.  I spit up in my mouth a little every time I see it.  Is there something wrong with "to give"?  Why do people do this?
http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/gift?q=gift

turketron

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 327
  • Age: 31
  • Location: WI
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #251 on: March 29, 2015, 02:12:38 PM »
For me the biggest thing that irks me isn't one specific mistake (they're/there/their or loose/lose etc.) but repeated mistakes. I can overlook any typo done once or twice, though I'll usually still notice and cringe a little on the inside. What gets me is when people make the same mistake over and over. I tried reading gocurrycracker.com a few times and had to stop because they have a chronic issue with dropping periods from the last sentence in each paragraph. Once I noticed that it was all I could see and it drove me up the effing wall.

Similarly, I have a coworker who types "defiantly" every time he means "definitely" and has been doing so for years now. Drives me nuts!

BlueHouse

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2585
  • Location: WDC
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #252 on: March 29, 2015, 05:36:59 PM »
Similarly, I have a coworker who types "defiantly" every time he means "definitely" and has been doing so for years now. Drives me nuts!
I'm generally a very good speller (or I used to be before I got so lazy).  But there are certain words that have always been difficult for me.  I know what these words are.  I know how to spell them because I've memorized them.  But my brain works differently with these words and I don't have them memorized the same way other words are memorized.  I have to use tricks to get the correct spelling and it slows me down a lot when typing. 
Definitely is one of these words.  Architect is another. 
Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand

1967mama

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2184
  • Age: 50
  • Location: Canada
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #253 on: March 29, 2015, 07:33:51 PM »
Similarly, I have a coworker who types "defiantly" every time he means "definitely" and has been doing so for years now. Drives me nuts!
I have to use tricks to get the correct spelling and it slows me down a lot when typing. 
Definitely is one of these words. 

This is one of my commonly misspelled words as well ... I memorized it by remembering "finite" in the middle of the word :-)

Malaysia41

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2851
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Half Way Around The World
    • My mmm journal
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #254 on: March 29, 2015, 07:38:17 PM »
Similarly, I have a coworker who types "defiantly" every time he means "definitely" and has been doing so for years now. Drives me nuts!
I have to use tricks to get the correct spelling and it slows me down a lot when typing. 
Definitely is one of these words. 

This is one of my commonly misspelled words as well ... I memorized it by remembering "finite" in the middle of the word :-)

My third grade teacher drilled this one into our brains by emphasizing the 'finite' part too. 

She was so good - I remember asking her how to spell 'beautiful'.  She handed me a huge dictionary and said, 'find it'.  She let me search for twenty minutes.  She didn't bail me out.  Whenever I said I couldn't find it, she'd just say, 'keep looking.  It's in there.'  At last I found it.  I never forgot the spelling after that.  She was AWESOME!
Last one to panic wins!

My Rohingya Refugee Charity (now Tax Exempt!)

I'm an enemy of POTUS, VPOTUS, and the privately funded political system that inflicted them upon us.

Gone Fishing

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2538
  • So Close went fishing on April 1, 2016
    • Journal
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #255 on: March 30, 2015, 12:03:53 PM »
I haven't really paid attention to this one until recently, but I see a lot of people using the term "Pre-planning".  Isn't that just planning?

Kris

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2610
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #256 on: March 30, 2015, 12:17:52 PM »
I would guess this has been said earlier in this very long thread, but:

I hate it when people mix up "me" and "I", etc.

"Peggy and me went to the store…"

"They bought it for Steve and I."

Ugh.
Please note: Libertarian4321 did not vote for either Hillary or Trump. He voted for Gary Johnson, who was the Libertarian candidate.

Kris

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2610
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #257 on: March 30, 2015, 12:19:09 PM »
I haven't really paid attention to this one until recently, but I see a lot of people using the term "Pre-planning".  Isn't that just planning?

Oy. 

Related: Advance warning. (Husband hates that one.)

But even worse:

Advanced warning.

Unless you really mean that your warning is more sophisticated than mine.
 
Please note: Libertarian4321 did not vote for either Hillary or Trump. He voted for Gary Johnson, who was the Libertarian candidate.

blue mutant

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 29
  • Age: 39
  • Location: Red Deer
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #258 on: March 30, 2015, 12:55:03 PM »
Fare and fair.

Somewhat unrelated, I had a letter go out prepared by an assistant (I did sign it) where beneficial was spelled benefishal. I only noticed it on reviewing the file a couple months later. D'oh

Kris

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2610
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #259 on: March 30, 2015, 01:01:35 PM »
Fare and fair.


Also, phase and faze. 

And reign/rein.  I see "free reign" a LOT lately. 
Please note: Libertarian4321 did not vote for either Hillary or Trump. He voted for Gary Johnson, who was the Libertarian candidate.

Gerard

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1284
  • Location: eastern canada
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #260 on: March 30, 2015, 04:32:01 PM »
Similarly, I have a coworker who types "defiantly" every time he means "definitely" and has been doing so for years now. Drives me nuts!

I'm almost certain that this is because if you type "definately", which is a reasonable enough misspelling, spell check tells you that you want "defiantly".
"I can't believe you're still doing things your way after I explained why my way is better."

TheBuddha

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 237
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #261 on: March 30, 2015, 08:30:40 PM »
I seem to hear a lot of verbs in the wrong past tense:

"I seen a deer."
"I had saw a deer."
"I had went to the store."
etc.

It drives me bonkers.

Also, people mix up "infer" and "imply". (I guess it bugs me more because the person is usually otherwise intelligent and articulate.)

Has anyone noticed that the phrase "in the world" is out of fashion? It's been replaced by "on the planet", e.g. "Apple is one of the largest corporations on the planet."
Debt-free as of 9/11/15. Paid off $50k in 3.5 years.




Kris

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2610
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #262 on: March 30, 2015, 08:38:51 PM »
Oooohhh, and then there's the need to use many syllables to appear more intelligent.

Instead of car, say vehicle.

Instead of use, say utilize.

Instead of right now, say at this particular point in time.

Etc.
Please note: Libertarian4321 did not vote for either Hillary or Trump. He voted for Gary Johnson, who was the Libertarian candidate.

BlueHouse

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2585
  • Location: WDC
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #263 on: March 31, 2015, 03:44:36 PM »
Instead of right now, say at this particular point in time.
In South Africa, "now" doesn't mean now.  It means later. Unless you say "just now", then that means much later.  Just cracked me up thinking of that.  The fastest you can get anything done is "now now", but that just means soon, but not right now.
Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand

Kris

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2610
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #264 on: March 31, 2015, 04:11:34 PM »
Instead of right now, say at this particular point in time.
In South Africa, "now" doesn't mean now.  It means later. Unless you say "just now", then that means much later.  Just cracked me up thinking of that.  The fastest you can get anything done is "now now", but that just means soon, but not right now.

Wow, I had no idea -- that's hilarious! 
Please note: Libertarian4321 did not vote for either Hillary or Trump. He voted for Gary Johnson, who was the Libertarian candidate.

Sunnymo

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 107
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #265 on: April 01, 2015, 03:25:22 AM »
Another 'noun as verb' example...

At the Olympics competitors now 'medal' in an event instead of 'win a medal'. Argh!

MandalayVA

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1542
  • Location: Orlando FL
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #266 on: April 01, 2015, 07:15:07 AM »
For me the biggest thing that irks me isn't one specific mistake (they're/there/their or loose/lose etc.) but repeated mistakes. I can overlook any typo done once or twice, though I'll usually still notice and cringe a little on the inside. What gets me is when people make the same mistake over and over. I tried reading gocurrycracker.com a few times and had to stop because they have a chronic issue with dropping periods from the last sentence in each paragraph. Once I noticed that it was all I could see and it drove me up the effing wall.

Oh, God, I thought that was just me.  I can read GCC but I keep wanting to yell WHY DO YOU HATE USING PERIODS? 

And more annoying shortened words I see:

Rezzies (reservations)
Vacay (vacation)
Resto (restaurant)
Luxe (deluxe)
Bae (baby)
Follow my road to semi-FIRE here:  The Road To Mandalay

Post-corporate life blog: Mandalay At Play  Latest entry: The Ginormocorp Survivors Page

Bardo

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 214
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #267 on: April 01, 2015, 07:46:26 AM »
For me the biggest thing that irks me isn't one specific mistake (they're/there/their or loose/lose etc.) but repeated mistakes. I can overlook any typo done once or twice, though I'll usually still notice and cringe a little on the inside. What gets me is when people make the same mistake over and over. I tried reading gocurrycracker.com a few times and had to stop because they have a chronic issue with dropping periods from the last sentence in each paragraph. Once I noticed that it was all I could see and it drove me up the effing wall.

Oh, God, I thought that was just me.  I can read GCC but I keep wanting to yell WHY DO YOU HATE USING PERIODS? 

And more annoying shortened words I see:

Rezzies (reservations)
Vacay (vacation)
Resto (restaurant)
Luxe (deluxe)
Bae (baby)

Annoying indeed.  I think these are all part of the adult baby-talk fad mentioned earlier ("veggie" is the one that is my pet peeve).    People apparently think that baby talk will make then sound winsome and charming, instead of childish and grating.  I keep hoping that they will come to their senses and that soon it will all go away. 



johnny847

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3199
    • My Blog
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #268 on: April 01, 2015, 08:49:19 AM »
For me the biggest thing that irks me isn't one specific mistake (they're/there/their or loose/lose etc.) but repeated mistakes. I can overlook any typo done once or twice, though I'll usually still notice and cringe a little on the inside. What gets me is when people make the same mistake over and over. I tried reading gocurrycracker.com a few times and had to stop because they have a chronic issue with dropping periods from the last sentence in each paragraph. Once I noticed that it was all I could see and it drove me up the effing wall.

Oh, God, I thought that was just me.  I can read GCC but I keep wanting to yell WHY DO YOU HATE USING PERIODS? 

Yea that was really annoying. At least it only seemed to happen at the end of paragraphs (at least, the times I noticed) so it wasn't terrible, but still. What the hell?

Grid

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 464
  • Age: 4
  • I kept dreaming of a world I thought I'd never see
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #269 on: April 01, 2015, 10:50:09 AM »
Another 'noun as verb' example...

At the Olympics competitors now 'medal' in an event instead of 'win a medal'. Argh!

I've never heard complaints about noun as verb stuff before.  There are many words that are both nouns and verbs already (pipe, drive, slot, whip, start, end... the list goes on), why not add more if it makes the language succinct without loss of meaning?
Journal, so I can find it later:  Living off the Grid

Bardo

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 214
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #270 on: April 01, 2015, 11:56:48 AM »
Another 'noun as verb' example...

At the Olympics competitors now 'medal' in an event instead of 'win a medal'. Argh!

I've never heard complaints about noun as verb stuff before.  There are many words that are both nouns and verbs already (pipe, drive, slot, whip, start, end... the list goes on), why not add more if it makes the language succinct without loss of meaning?

Well, because every language has standards of usage, and in English, succinctness is not among them. 

Interestingly enough, in "1984" Newspeak dictated invariant noun-verbs. 

Cathy

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1044
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #271 on: April 01, 2015, 01:11:33 PM »
Formation of nouns from verbs has been going on for the entire history of the language. It's not a novel offensive concept. For example, the word "kidnapper" is the original form of the word, first found in the 1600s. The verb "to kidnap" was constructed as a verb version of the noun. Given the centuries-old history, it's hard to argue that construction of verbs from nouns is per se objectionable.

Oooohhh, and then there's the need to use many syllables to appear more intelligent.

Instead of car, say vehicle.

These words aren't synonyms. "Vehicle" describes any machine or device used for carrying something, and also has an even broader metaphorical use (e.g. IRA as a "savings vehicle"). If the speaker wants to focus on the nature of the device as something that transports people, "vehicle" may well be a better choice than "car", which brings to mind specifically one kind of vehicle. In writing and speaking, we're often forced to choose between words with similar meanings, and the choice of which to use is based on the expectations of the audience, the intent of the speaker, and other relevant factors. I agree with you that simpler language is generally preferably, but good writers don't follow rigid rules like "never use the word 'vehicle'", because that's silly.
This post contains only general information on the issues raised by this topic. This post does not provide help tailored to your specific situation. There are many facts that could be relevant to your specific situation and I am not in possession of those facts. If you need help tailored to your specific situation, you should retain an appropriate professional and not rely on this post.

Kris

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2610
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #272 on: April 01, 2015, 01:28:49 PM »
Formation of nouns from verbs has been going on for the entire history of the language. It's not a novel offensive concept. For example, the word "kidnapper" is the original form of the word, first found in the 1600s. The verb "to kidnap" was constructed as a verb version of the noun. Given the centuries-old history, it's hard to argue that construction of verbs from nouns is per se objectionable.

Oooohhh, and then there's the need to use many syllables to appear more intelligent.

Instead of car, say vehicle.

These words aren't synonyms. "Vehicle" describes any machine or device used for carrying something, and also has an even broader metaphorical use (e.g. IRA as a "savings vehicle"). If the speaker wants to focus on the nature of the device as something that transports people, "vehicle" may well be a better choice than "car", which brings to mind specifically one kind of vehicle. In writing and speaking, we're often forced to choose between words with similar meanings, and the choice of which to use is based on the expectations of the audience, the intent of the speaker, and other relevant factors. I agree with you that simpler language is generally preferably, but good writers don't follow rigid rules like "never use the word 'vehicle'", because that's silly.

No, of course, but that's not what I'm saying.  I'm talking about people (and I know more than a few) who literally never say the word "car" to mean their car.  They always, always, say vehicle.  Because, I think, they feel it makes them sound more erudite.
Please note: Libertarian4321 did not vote for either Hillary or Trump. He voted for Gary Johnson, who was the Libertarian candidate.

Kris

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2610
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #273 on: April 01, 2015, 01:30:12 PM »
I have another one.

Incorrect over-use of the word "myself".

"If you have any questions, contact Jean or myself."

Dammit, that's completely incorrect.  Someone else can't contact you as "myself".  The correct word is 'me'."  Only I can contact myself. 
Please note: Libertarian4321 did not vote for either Hillary or Trump. He voted for Gary Johnson, who was the Libertarian candidate.

frugalnacho

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2882
  • Age: 34
  • Location: Madison Heights, Michigan
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #274 on: April 01, 2015, 01:34:12 PM »
Formation of nouns from verbs has been going on for the entire history of the language. It's not a novel offensive concept. For example, the word "kidnapper" is the original form of the word, first found in the 1600s. The verb "to kidnap" was constructed as a verb version of the noun. Given the centuries-old history, it's hard to argue that construction of verbs from nouns is per se objectionable.

Oooohhh, and then there's the need to use many syllables to appear more intelligent.

Instead of car, say vehicle.

These words aren't synonyms. "Vehicle" describes any machine or device used for carrying something, and also has an even broader metaphorical use (e.g. IRA as a "savings vehicle"). If the speaker wants to focus on the nature of the device as something that transports people, "vehicle" may well be a better choice than "car", which brings to mind specifically one kind of vehicle. In writing and speaking, we're often forced to choose between words with similar meanings, and the choice of which to use is based on the expectations of the audience, the intent of the speaker, and other relevant factors. I agree with you that simpler language is generally preferably, but good writers don't follow rigid rules like "never use the word 'vehicle'", because that's silly.

No, of course, but that's not what I'm saying.  I'm talking about people (and I know more than a few) who literally never say the word "car" to mean their car.  They always, always, say vehicle.  Because, I think, they feel it makes them sound more erudite.

What a bunch of cavemen.  I prefer the term automobile.  More syllables means more smarter.


MarciaB

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 319
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Oregon
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #275 on: April 01, 2015, 06:31:07 PM »
I tried reading gocurrycracker.com a few times and had to stop because they have a chronic issue with dropping periods from the last sentence in each paragraph.

I noticed that too and figured that he was sort of using paragraphs the way you use bulleted lists. Some times each bullet will be an incomplete sentence and won't have punctuation at the end... ?

I love his blog and choose to read it, despite the weird punctuation "policy" he seems to prefer. Whatever.
My (admittedly kinda lame) blog on topics having to do with stuff, paring down your stuff to nothing, travel, and misc: www.baggypop.com

BlueHouse

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2585
  • Location: WDC
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #276 on: April 01, 2015, 07:25:29 PM »
Formation of nouns from verbs has been going on for the entire history of the language. It's not a novel offensive concept. For example, the word "kidnapper" is the original form of the word, first found in the 1600s. The verb "to kidnap" was constructed as a verb version of the noun. Given the centuries-old history, it's hard to argue that construction of verbs from nouns is per se objectionable.

And back-formation of verbs?  How do those do historically?  Because I don't like these and would like to kill off the words forever.
Orientation --> Orientate.  Really!  This is apparently pretty common in some countries.  I don't understand why orient wouldn't be the correct verb.
Conversation --> Conversate  (from a doctor, no less)
Incentive --> Incentivize.  Why can't we just say offer an incentive? this word has become pervasive.

Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand

Gerard

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1284
  • Location: eastern canada
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #277 on: April 01, 2015, 08:31:50 PM »
Incentive --> Incentivize.  Why can't we just say offer an incentive? this word has become pervasive.

Well, technically this one's not back formation. And -ize is a fairly productive suffix. You've gotta love words like bowdlerize.  </linguistnerd>

"I can't believe you're still doing things your way after I explained why my way is better."

secondcor521

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1205
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Boise, Idaho
  • Big cattle, no hat.
    • Age of Eon - Overwatch player videos
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #278 on: April 02, 2015, 01:28:36 PM »
I've heard "incent" as a verb at work a lot.  Not sure offhand if it's real or not.  "Let's incent team members to maximize their productivity this quarter."
Like Overwatch?  Check out this YouTube channel:  http://bit.ly/AgeOfEon

RetiredAt63

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7017
  • Location: Eastern Ontario, Canada
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #279 on: April 06, 2015, 12:37:27 PM »
The verb that goes with "conversation" is "to converse".

Conversation --> Conversate  (from a doctor, no less)

Ici on parle Franglais.  So many Anglophones (yes, that is a legitimate word, thank you, at least here, it goes with Francophone and Allophone) use the French verb form in English - it would make perfect sense in French, but sounds odd in English.  Of course using similar words in the other language can cause issues - one government minister talked about rampant something, and got yelled at by the English media - in French 'rampant' means creeping, so the intended meaning was quite different.

And yes, homonyms - reign/rein, faze/phase, etc.  I blame spell check.  You have all seen this, eh?
http://www.latech.edu/tech/liberal-arts/geography/courses/spellchecker.htm
The measure of civilization is how people treat one another.

http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/meetups-and-social-events/ontario's-own-camp-mustache-2017/ - MEET US THERE!

BlueHouse

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2585
  • Location: WDC
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #280 on: April 06, 2015, 02:13:48 PM »
The verb that goes with "conversation" is "to converse".

Conversation --> Conversate  (from a doctor, no less)
Yes.  I know!  So how do I tell my doctor that?  I've heard "conversate" more than once and almost choke when I do.
Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand

RetiredAt63

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7017
  • Location: Eastern Ontario, Canada
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #281 on: April 06, 2015, 04:10:12 PM »
I don't know.  I used to discuss writing style with my university class, and the ones that resented it the most (we don't need THIS!) were the ones that needed it the most.

The verb that goes with "conversation" is "to converse".

Conversation --> Conversate  (from a doctor, no less)
Yes.  I know!  So how do I tell my doctor that?  I've heard "conversate" more than once and almost choke when I do.
The measure of civilization is how people treat one another.

http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/meetups-and-social-events/ontario's-own-camp-mustache-2017/ - MEET US THERE!

RetiredAt63

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7017
  • Location: Eastern Ontario, Canada
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #282 on: April 06, 2015, 04:15:15 PM »
Can we add cutely/folksy to the nail on blackboard screechers?  Along with veggies?

I am reading an on-line discussion on raising rabbits for meat.  Obviously when these are animals you are planning to eat, you are not going to call them bun-buns - but 'hoppers?  Yes that is "'hoppers", I did not add the " ' ".  It makes me think of grasshoppers.  If someone knows enough about a topic to use correct terminology (bucks, does, kindling) this is downright cutesy, and off-putting.  Gah.
The measure of civilization is how people treat one another.

http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/meetups-and-social-events/ontario's-own-camp-mustache-2017/ - MEET US THERE!

Hank Sinatra

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 129
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #283 on: April 06, 2015, 05:20:04 PM »
Hi. Long thread here. I might have missed these  so I'll beg the ol' pardon if I'm being redundant.

Along with the OP's "then" when people mean "than", I see a lot of "He should OF.." instead of "He should HAVE..."

Even the 6'oclock news guys, professional talkers, all too often will say "Eck-scape" instead of "escape".

And the never popular:  These days most everyone uses a computer which conveys no real information unless you decode the incorrect  meaningless words. They mean: These days almost everyone uses a computer, or       possibly "These days most people use a computer.

These are not mere "Grammar Nazi" issues. Who vs whom. Or even their vs there. One is considered an over-refinement even by many English teachers today and never impacts the meaning anyway.  The second could just be an on-the-fly typo or editing error.  On informal internet  forums nobody is writing for the ages. I can sway with the idiomatic or argot. But "should of" for "should have". "Eck-scape" (especially from a media communicator) ,  "most everyone" ... ? 




RetiredAt63

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7017
  • Location: Eastern Ontario, Canada
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #284 on: April 07, 2015, 07:36:57 AM »
They are everywhere.  New one for the list: "not for the feint of heart".

Just shoot me now.
The measure of civilization is how people treat one another.

http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/meetups-and-social-events/ontario's-own-camp-mustache-2017/ - MEET US THERE!

Gerard

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1284
  • Location: eastern canada
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #285 on: April 07, 2015, 09:05:24 AM »
  These days most everyone uses a computer which conveys no real information unless you decode the incorrect  meaningless words. They mean: These days almost everyone uses a computer, or       possibly "These days most people use a computer.

This one doesn't bother me. It's been around for hundreds of years, and is definitely a reduced for of "almost". To me, it's in the same category as "don't" or "it's".

"I can't believe you're still doing things your way after I explained why my way is better."

FIPurpose

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 560
  • Location: WA
    • FI With Purpose
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #286 on: April 07, 2015, 11:28:17 AM »
Ugh.. Don't get me started on 'don't' and 'it's'. Why can't everyone on the internet just write in perfect prose for all their conversations. Guys it's not that hard! I'm only expecting everyone to have the same education level as me. Remember all internet debates must include a thesis.
We have received an offer to join the Peace Corps, and will be heading out in the second half of 2017. We'll be writing a newsletter to send out when we can here:
Our Peace Corps News Letter

BlueHouse

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2585
  • Location: WDC
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #287 on: April 09, 2015, 11:00:00 AM »
What's wrong with don't?  Seriously?  Now I'm afraid to speak.

Has anyone mentioned "Where's it AT?"  I hate that! 

Hi Johnny.  Where are you AT?  AAAUUUGGGHHH!!!  Stop. just stop after you.  Where are you.  That's the question. 
Washington DC news stinks because the anchors cannot even speak proper English!  I hear the "where you at?" ALL. THE. TIME. 


Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand

Gerard

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1284
  • Location: eastern canada
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #288 on: April 10, 2015, 03:55:11 PM »
What's wrong with don't?  Seriously?  Now I'm afraid to speak.

Nothing. That's my point!
"I can't believe you're still doing things your way after I explained why my way is better."

Kris

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2610
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #289 on: April 10, 2015, 04:23:38 PM »
I swear on everything that's holy, if I see one more person make a plural with an apostrophe, I'm gonna stroke out.

Which means I should probably cash in all my retirement funds and go on a massive spending spree, because I don't have that long to live.
Please note: Libertarian4321 did not vote for either Hillary or Trump. He voted for Gary Johnson, who was the Libertarian candidate.

Grid

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 464
  • Age: 4
  • I kept dreaming of a world I thought I'd never see
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #290 on: April 10, 2015, 07:44:15 PM »
I swear on everything that's holy, if I see one more person make a plural with an apostrophe, I'm gonna stroke out.

Which means I should probably cash in all my retirement funds and go on a massive spending spree, because I don't have that long to live.

Do consider donating to one of my retirement 
Spoiler: show
fund's
.

                                     
Journal, so I can find it later:  Living off the Grid

TheBuddha

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 237
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #291 on: April 10, 2015, 09:19:50 PM »
For your consideration: http://www.unnecessaryquotes.com
Debt-free as of 9/11/15. Paid off $50k in 3.5 years.




Kris

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2610
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #292 on: April 11, 2015, 03:28:10 PM »
I swear on everything that's holy, if I see one more person make a plural with an apostrophe, I'm gonna stroke out.

Which means I should probably cash in all my retirement funds and go on a massive spending spree, because I don't have that long to live.

Do consider donating to one of my retirement 
Spoiler: show
fund's
.

Lol good one, Grid! Thanks for the laugh!

                                     
Please note: Libertarian4321 did not vote for either Hillary or Trump. He voted for Gary Johnson, who was the Libertarian candidate.

Grid

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 464
  • Age: 4
  • I kept dreaming of a world I thought I'd never see
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #293 on: April 11, 2015, 07:45:53 PM »
I swear on everything that's holy, if I see one more person make a plural with an apostrophe, I'm gonna stroke out.

Which means I should probably cash in all my retirement funds and go on a massive spending spree, because I don't have that long to live.

Do consider donating to one of my retirement 
Spoiler: show
fund's
.
 


                                     

Lol good one, Grid! Thanks for the laugh!

I think the "spoiler alert" feature is new...  It works well for some posts haha
Journal, so I can find it later:  Living off the Grid

Riff

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 112
  • Location: West Michigan
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #294 on: April 12, 2015, 12:42:39 AM »
I like the little sayings:
You can have a little or a lot.
If you spell definitely with an A, then you're definitely an A-hole. (Thanks, Oatmeal!)

So, I'm guessing that this is a pro-Oxford comma crowd?

Kris

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2610
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #295 on: April 12, 2015, 09:07:36 AM »
I like the little sayings:
You can have a little or a lot.
If you spell definitely with an A, then you're definitely an A-hole. (Thanks, Oatmeal!)

So, I'm guessing that this is a pro-Oxford comma crowd?

I don't know about the crowd, but I am definitely pro-Oxford comma.
Please note: Libertarian4321 did not vote for either Hillary or Trump. He voted for Gary Johnson, who was the Libertarian candidate.

Philociraptor

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 794
  • Age: 28
  • Location: DFW, TX
  • FIRE Deadline: May 2029
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #296 on: April 12, 2015, 09:09:51 AM »
I like the little sayings:
You can have a little or a lot.
If you spell definitely with an A, then you're definitely an A-hole. (Thanks, Oatmeal!)

So, I'm guessing that this is a pro-Oxford comma crowd?

I don't know about the crowd, but I am definitely pro-Oxford comma.
It's the only way to be.

Karen

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 27
  • Location: Truckin' all over the US
    • Team Trucking Lifestyle
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #297 on: April 20, 2015, 09:13:32 AM »
I used to live in Wales and had to get used to people saying stuff like "I'll do it now in a minute." At first I couldn't understand. "Well, which is it? Now, or a minute later?"

Check out the team trucking life!

www.teamtruckinglife.blogspot.com

mrpercentage

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1236
  • Location: PHX, AZ
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #298 on: May 02, 2015, 06:44:07 PM »
I stpd carign wen I reeleyezed thet I he'd no prahblem undrstand'n  wriitin lik thes. Unlass it fermal I justa dewnt kair.
absolute truth... prison guard that has seen shanks does not makes 45k a year managing bullshit tech that was outsourced for what?.... cheaper tech and less taxes... probably

Silverado

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 151
Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #299 on: May 02, 2015, 08:01:19 PM »
I stpd carign wen I reeleyezed thet I he'd no prahblem undrstand'n  wriitin lik thes. Unlass it fermal I justa dewnt kair.

Different thread, about the same content.
___________

Heard (herd) a report of someone with a BS being corrected for (four) using 'should of' and said "oh I can never keep straight (strait) when that isn't correct"

Uh, go with never.

smack right to the forehead.