Author Topic: Firearms in the home  (Read 436439 times)

Curbside Prophet

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1200 on: June 13, 2016, 08:22:50 PM »
There is something that I've been wondering about this whole Pulse mass murder event.  Pulse was a huge public bar, in effect.  Something like 300 people were in there at the start of the shooting, and the only person who had a gun was the off-duty cop working as a bouncer?  Why?  First of all, a bar that size really needed more than one bouncer.  And Florida has a concealed carry license, have these people never heard of the Pink Pistols?  If only a couple people had handguns in this event, this could have ended much sooner than it did.  It took the cops 3 hours to raid the place.  This nutter was taking his sweet time killing gays.

CCW is legal in Florida but not in bars.

MoonShadow

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1201 on: June 13, 2016, 08:31:09 PM »
There is something that I've been wondering about this whole Pulse mass murder event.  Pulse was a huge public bar, in effect.  Something like 300 people were in there at the start of the shooting, and the only person who had a gun was the off-duty cop working as a bouncer?  Why?  First of all, a bar that size really needed more than one bouncer.  And Florida has a concealed carry license, have these people never heard of the Pink Pistols?  If only a couple people had handguns in this event, this could have ended much sooner than it did.  It took the cops 3 hours to raid the place.  This nutter was taking his sweet time killing gays.

CCW is legal in Florida but not in bars.

So this bar would basiclly have been another gun free zone?

Curbside Prophet

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1202 on: June 13, 2016, 08:31:27 PM »
What about shotguns?  This is almost universally accepted as a good self-defense weapon (even Joe Biden has said as much).  Do you think you couldn't kill 50 people with a Vepr-12 and some 00 buckshot?  I'd venture to guess you could kill a lot more.  So do we ban shotguns now?  See, slippery slope.

As for the AR-15, if you look at the pictures of all the responding officers, what rifle are they carrying?  Yup, the AR-15.  Why?  Because it's good in defense situations for a number of reasons including less over penetration than even handgun rounds.  None of them are carrying bolt actions except maybe SWAT snipers. 

The AR-15 is an efficient weapon.  No argument there.  It's not a hunting rifle (most states don't even allow you to hunt with a .22 caliber).  It's a good defensive weapon that in the hands of the wrong person can be misused but that is entirely beside the point.  If one has the right to self-defense, doesn't one have the right to use the best method out there? 

Curbside Prophet

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1203 on: June 13, 2016, 08:31:58 PM »
There is something that I've been wondering about this whole Pulse mass murder event.  Pulse was a huge public bar, in effect.  Something like 300 people were in there at the start of the shooting, and the only person who had a gun was the off-duty cop working as a bouncer?  Why?  First of all, a bar that size really needed more than one bouncer.  And Florida has a concealed carry license, have these people never heard of the Pink Pistols?  If only a couple people had handguns in this event, this could have ended much sooner than it did.  It took the cops 3 hours to raid the place.  This nutter was taking his sweet time killing gays.

CCW is legal in Florida but not in bars.

So this bar would basiclly have been another gun free zone?

Basically.

randymarsh

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1204 on: June 13, 2016, 08:32:44 PM »
And Florida has a concealed carry license, have these people never heard of the Pink Pistols?  If only a couple people had handguns in this event, this could have ended much sooner than it did. 

FL law says guns are banned on:

Quote
Any portion of an establishment licensed to dispense alcoholic beverages for consumption on the premises, which portion of the establishment is primarily devoted to such purpose;
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MoonShadow

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1205 on: June 13, 2016, 08:34:10 PM »
There is something that I've been wondering about this whole Pulse mass murder event.  Pulse was a huge public bar, in effect.  Something like 300 people were in there at the start of the shooting, and the only person who had a gun was the off-duty cop working as a bouncer?  Why?  First of all, a bar that size really needed more than one bouncer.  And Florida has a concealed carry license, have these people never heard of the Pink Pistols?  If only a couple people had handguns in this event, this could have ended much sooner than it did.  It took the cops 3 hours to raid the place.  This nutter was taking his sweet time killing gays.

CCW is legal in Florida but not in bars.

So this bar would basiclly have been another gun free zone?

Basically.

Well, then.  I guess there still is a pattern here worth taking note of.  All of the newsworthy shootings that have occurred in my recent memory have all occurred in locations wherein personally owned firearms were actually banned.

JLee

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1206 on: June 13, 2016, 08:41:32 PM »
That's a big reach, IMO. The availability & access to guns Americans enjoy allow us to take those destructive actions with great speed and efficiency. I don't think it's a fair comparison.
If not hate speech, what influences would've driven the motivation for someone to shoot up a gay bar?

There is something that I've been wondering about this whole Pulse mass murder event.  Pulse was a huge public bar, in effect.  Something like 300 people were in there at the start of the shooting, and the only person who had a gun was the off-duty cop working as a bouncer?  Why?  First of all, a bar that size really needed more than one bouncer.  And Florida has a concealed carry license, have these people never heard of the Pink Pistols?  If only a couple people had handguns in this event, this could have ended much sooner than it did.  It took the cops 3 hours to raid the place.  This nutter was taking his sweet time killing gays.

No competent and reasonable gun owner will carry a gun when they're going out to a bar to drink.

MoonShadow

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1207 on: June 13, 2016, 08:48:00 PM »


There is something that I've been wondering about this whole Pulse mass murder event.  Pulse was a huge public bar, in effect.  Something like 300 people were in there at the start of the shooting, and the only person who had a gun was the off-duty cop working as a bouncer?  Why?  First of all, a bar that size really needed more than one bouncer.  And Florida has a concealed carry license, have these people never heard of the Pink Pistols?  If only a couple people had handguns in this event, this could have ended much sooner than it did.  It took the cops 3 hours to raid the place.  This nutter was taking his sweet time killing gays.

No competent and reasonable gun owner will carry a gun when they're going out to a bar to drink.

Why?  Are there no designated drivers at a place like this?  I drink free soft drinks every time I enter a bar.

Midwest

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1208 on: June 13, 2016, 08:56:56 PM »
That's a big reach, IMO. The availability & access to guns Americans enjoy allow us to take those destructive actions with great speed and efficiency. I don't think it's a fair comparison.
If not hate speech, what influences would've driven the motivation for someone to shoot up a gay bar?


Maybe he hated himself.  https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/report-orlando-nightclub-shooter-visited-222620444.html

If this is true, it just gets weirder and weirder.

JLee

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1209 on: June 13, 2016, 09:07:03 PM »


There is something that I've been wondering about this whole Pulse mass murder event.  Pulse was a huge public bar, in effect.  Something like 300 people were in there at the start of the shooting, and the only person who had a gun was the off-duty cop working as a bouncer?  Why?  First of all, a bar that size really needed more than one bouncer.  And Florida has a concealed carry license, have these people never heard of the Pink Pistols?  If only a couple people had handguns in this event, this could have ended much sooner than it did.  It took the cops 3 hours to raid the place.  This nutter was taking his sweet time killing gays.

No competent and reasonable gun owner will carry a gun when they're going out to a bar to drink.

Why?  Are there no designated drivers at a place like this?  I drink free soft drinks every time I enter a bar.
See bolded. There may have been a few DD's...who knows -- but with Uber/Lyft being so prevalent these days I would not be surprised if they were an incredibly small population.

That's a big reach, IMO. The availability & access to guns Americans enjoy allow us to take those destructive actions with great speed and efficiency. I don't think it's a fair comparison.
If not hate speech, what influences would've driven the motivation for someone to shoot up a gay bar?


Maybe he hated himself.  https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/report-orlando-nightclub-shooter-visited-222620444.html

If this is true, it just gets weirder and weirder.
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« Last Edit: June 13, 2016, 09:09:17 PM by JLee »

randymarsh

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1210 on: June 13, 2016, 09:10:36 PM »
That's a big reach, IMO. The availability & access to guns Americans enjoy allow us to take those destructive actions with great speed and efficiency. I don't think it's a fair comparison.
If not hate speech, what influences would've driven the motivation for someone to shoot up a gay bar?


Maybe he hated himself.  https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/report-orlando-nightclub-shooter-visited-222620444.html

If this is true, it just gets weirder and weirder.

Not the first gay man to live a double life but damn this is extreme.
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MoonShadow

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1211 on: June 13, 2016, 09:17:37 PM »


There is something that I've been wondering about this whole Pulse mass murder event.  Pulse was a huge public bar, in effect.  Something like 300 people were in there at the start of the shooting, and the only person who had a gun was the off-duty cop working as a bouncer?  Why?  First of all, a bar that size really needed more than one bouncer.  And Florida has a concealed carry license, have these people never heard of the Pink Pistols?  If only a couple people had handguns in this event, this could have ended much sooner than it did.  It took the cops 3 hours to raid the place.  This nutter was taking his sweet time killing gays.

No competent and reasonable gun owner will carry a gun when they're going out to a bar to drink.

Why?  Are there no designated drivers at a place like this?  I drink free soft drinks every time I enter a bar.
See bolded. There may have been a few DD's...who knows -- but with Uber/Lyft being so prevalent these days I would not be surprised if they were an incredibly small population.

I go to bars to drink too.  Free soft drinks.  The point was that there is a legitimate reason that someone would be at a bar, not drinking alcohol.  Should that person, if they have a concealed carry license, not be permitted to carry?  What about the bartender(s) and other employees?  Why was the only armed person in a huge bar the off-duty cop, which would have been easy to identify for Joe Average inside of a gay bar, much less a well trained security professional intent on mass murder?

JLee

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1212 on: June 13, 2016, 09:58:49 PM »


There is something that I've been wondering about this whole Pulse mass murder event.  Pulse was a huge public bar, in effect.  Something like 300 people were in there at the start of the shooting, and the only person who had a gun was the off-duty cop working as a bouncer?  Why?  First of all, a bar that size really needed more than one bouncer.  And Florida has a concealed carry license, have these people never heard of the Pink Pistols?  If only a couple people had handguns in this event, this could have ended much sooner than it did.  It took the cops 3 hours to raid the place.  This nutter was taking his sweet time killing gays.

No competent and reasonable gun owner will carry a gun when they're going out to a bar to drink.

Why?  Are there no designated drivers at a place like this?  I drink free soft drinks every time I enter a bar.
See bolded. There may have been a few DD's...who knows -- but with Uber/Lyft being so prevalent these days I would not be surprised if they were an incredibly small population.

I go to bars to drink too.  Free soft drinks.  The point was that there is a legitimate reason that someone would be at a bar, not drinking alcohol.  Should that person, if they have a concealed carry license, not be permitted to carry?  What about the bartender(s) and other employees?  Why was the only armed person in a huge bar the off-duty cop, which would have been easy to identify for Joe Average inside of a gay bar, much less a well trained security professional intent on mass murder?

I get the impression that you think I am arguing with you, and I am not.  I'm clarifying that most people go to bars to drink. For the sake of clarification (and to avoid further smartass responses), the colloquial "drink" in a bar context means "to consume alcohol." I'm not going to bother addressing your massive list of accusatory questions, because absolutely none of them are relevant to what I said.

Side note - after I left law enforcement in 2011, I was a supervisor for G4S (the security company who employed the shooter).  Calling their employees "well trained" is a huge leap. Many people worked there because they couldn't get hired at a police department (probably much like this guy, who went through the Florida police academy and ended up working security).

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1213 on: June 14, 2016, 12:18:05 AM »
When people mention that nobody's coming for your guns, what they mean are the many types of guns that would remain unregulated.  Your revolvers, shotguns, derringers, muskets, bolt action hunting rifles, etc would likely all remain unaffected.  This type of limited weapons ban would follow the same precedent where you can't buy a nuke because it's been determined that it's too dangerous.

It may well take fifty or a hundred years until a sales ban becomes effective in minimizing the availability of particular weapons, so it's not an ideal solution.  Better solutions would be to implement skill based licensing, mental health checks, background checks for every weapon sold, exclusions for people currently on terrorist watch-lists, databases of gun owners that can easily be cross-referenced by law enforcement, etc.  Many of those have been partially and half-assedly implemented already . . . it would just be a matter of improving what already exists.

Skill based licensing? So that mass shooters would be even better trained? Obviously these people are pretty skilled with their weapons, judging by the death toll.
Background checks - San Bernadino, Orlando, Dylan Roof, etc. - these people passed all of the current background checks required in this country. What makes you think they wouldn't be able to pass a skill test?
Cross referencing gun owners...? none of these people committed massive crimes before their shoot-outs, which is why they were able to buy their guns legally, with a full background check. Hell, the FBI runs the NICS database at the moment; how much more could you really add?


Do you have any suggestions that are not currently being used that would prevent mass shootings? California has some of the strictest gun laws in the country; still had a mass shooting. Several, actually. 

I understand that there are small windows for improvements in the current laws, but almost none of them would stop any of the latest mass shootings.

Rounding up and banning semi-automatic weapons is right up there with rounding up and banning Muslims. They would have similar reductions in public terror attacks in the United States, and be similarly encroaching upon people's rights.
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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1214 on: June 14, 2016, 12:59:09 AM »
Probably because one person's speech doesn't result in 50 murders.
Probably more. Hate speech, and the actions by people that often follow it, have had a massive destructive impact on human lives.

That's a big reach, IMO. The availability & access to guns Americans enjoy allow us to take those destructive actions with great speed and efficiency. I don't think it's a fair comparison.




I agree that owning or having easy access to a firearm makes it more expedient to do destructive acts compared to say building a bomb. However the approx. 300 million legally owned firearms in the US are rarely involved in crimes or mass shootings. This shows that most gun owners are responsible regardless of how speedy or available a firearm is.

So should we limit or ban a right from an entire nation of responsible owners because a few have caused loss of lives? Would you limit or ban free speech to an entire nation of people because a few may spew hate speech causing a riot which causes loss of lives?
[/quote]

I still don't think the hate speech argument is relevant. The right to private firearm ownership is way more specific than freedom of speech and more directly responsible for violence.

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1215 on: June 14, 2016, 01:10:20 AM »
I still don't think the hate speech argument is relevant. The right to private firearm ownership is way more specific than freedom of speech and more directly responsible for violence.

I'm not sure that assertion is backed up by statistical analysis...
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randymarsh

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1216 on: June 14, 2016, 02:21:52 AM »
I still don't think the hate speech argument is relevant. The right to private firearm ownership is way more specific than freedom of speech and more directly responsible for violence.

I'm not sure that assertion is backed up by statistical analysis...

Freedom of speech is clearly implicated in ~20,000 homicides a year?
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ahoy

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1217 on: June 14, 2016, 05:50:09 AM »
I hesitate to comment on this kind of thread.  372 mass (4 or more injured or killed) shootings in the US for 2015.  More mass shootings than days in the yr!.  Can't forget about the more than 26,000 injured and 13,000 other victims shot dead each yr.   Where is their right to live?  It's unbelievable sad.

I know I know,  someone will now tell me about car deaths and why not ban them.  But seriously, other countries just shake their heads and can't understand the US gun culture.  Some tourists ARE afraid of stepping inside America in fear that they will be shot  Mexico is surely safer.... 

winkeyman

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1218 on: June 14, 2016, 05:58:31 AM »
I hesitate to comment on this kind of thread.  372 mass (4 or more injured or killed) shootings in the US for 2015.  More mass shootings than days in the yr!.  Can't forget about the more than 26,000 injured and 13,000 other victims shot dead each yr.   Where is their right to live?  It's unbelievable sad.

I know I know,  someone will now tell me about car deaths and why not ban them.  But seriously, other countries just shake their heads and can't understand the US gun culture.  Some tourists ARE afraid of stepping inside America in fear that they will be shot  Mexico is surely safer....

Are people serious when they say stuff like this, or is it just an expression? Because I hear it a lot.

All people, including murder victims, have the right to live. Others do not have the right to murder them. However, people do not have the right to be kept alive by whatever means necessary for whatever cost necessary.

If we took Trump's lead and banned all Muslims from America, I think it would probably save many American lives over the course of the next decade due to a lack of Islamic terror attacks. But most people disagree with this tactic because it would violate the rights of millions of people.

If we locked up all depressed, bipolar, schizophrenic, etc people for life, it would save many lives lost due to murder and suicide. But we wouldn't do that because it would violate the rights of millions.

A person's right to live doesn't trump everything else under the sun.

GuitarStv

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1219 on: June 14, 2016, 06:44:53 AM »
I hesitate to comment on this kind of thread.  372 mass (4 or more injured or killed) shootings in the US for 2015.  More mass shootings than days in the yr!.  Can't forget about the more than 26,000 injured and 13,000 other victims shot dead each yr.   Where is their right to live?  It's unbelievable sad.

I know I know,  someone will now tell me about car deaths and why not ban them.  But seriously, other countries just shake their heads and can't understand the US gun culture.  Some tourists ARE afraid of stepping inside America in fear that they will be shot  Mexico is surely safer....

Are people serious when they say stuff like this, or is it just an expression? Because I hear it a lot.

All people, including murder victims, have the right to live. Others do not have the right to murder them. However, people do not have the right to be kept alive by whatever means necessary for whatever cost necessary.

If we took Trump's lead and banned all Muslims from America, I think it would probably save many American lives over the course of the next decade due to a lack of Islamic terror attacks. But most people disagree with this tactic because it would violate the rights of millions of people.

If we locked up all depressed, bipolar, schizophrenic, etc people for life, it would save many lives lost due to murder and suicide. But we wouldn't do that because it would violate the rights of millions.

A person's right to live doesn't trump everything else under the sun.

Just to be clear . . . you equate the loss of being able to legally buy a semi-automatic with high capacity magazines and no background check or record that you have the gun . . . to being locked up in a mental institution, or government sanctioned religious discrimination?

See, this is why it's not possible to have a reasonable discussion.  That's a patently unreasonable position that you're starting from.

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1220 on: June 14, 2016, 06:59:26 AM »
ome tourists ARE afraid of stepping inside America in fear that they will be shot  Mexico is surely safer....

Are you joking about Mexico or just horribly misinformed?  The murder rate in Mexico is very high despite their gun laws.

Canada is at 1.4 per 100k, US is at 3.8, and there's Mexico at 15.7.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_intentional_homicide_rate

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1221 on: June 14, 2016, 07:02:46 AM »
That weakens their argument for me because there are consequences to rights. Just like the 4th amendment means some criminals will go free, the 2nd amendment means we will have more shootings and more gun violence. That's clearly acceptable to many but I don't think it's outrageous for others to think that maybe the juice isn't worth the squeeze.
You may be right that there would be fewer shootings and less gun violence if the population were disarmed, but there is no evidence that there would be fewer murders and less violence overall. I personally do not believe that there would be any increase in safety within the United States by repealing or abriding the 2nd amendment in any way that is not already currently considered constitutional based on Supreme Court case law. My personal interpretation of the words "The right to keep or bear arms shall not be infringed" would further restrict the constitutionallity of many current gun and weapon laws (I may agree with a few current laws that I consider "infinging" on the right to keep or bear arms).
And that is because the NRA convinced Congress to stop funding the research.  I wonder why?

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1222 on: June 14, 2016, 07:06:30 AM »
I hesitate to comment on this kind of thread.  372 mass (4 or more injured or killed) shootings in the US for 2015.  More mass shootings than days in the yr!.  Can't forget about the more than 26,000 injured and 13,000 other victims shot dead each yr.   Where is their right to live?  It's unbelievable sad.

I know I know,  someone will now tell me about car deaths and why not ban them.  But seriously, other countries just shake their heads and can't understand the US gun culture.  Some tourists ARE afraid of stepping inside America in fear that they will be shot  Mexico is surely safer....

Are people serious when they say stuff like this, or is it just an expression? Because I hear it a lot.

All people, including murder victims, have the right to live. Others do not have the right to murder them. However, people do not have the right to be kept alive by whatever means necessary for whatever cost necessary.

If we took Trump's lead and banned all Muslims from America, I think it would probably save many American lives over the course of the next decade due to a lack of Islamic terror attacks. But most people disagree with this tactic because it would violate the rights of millions of people.

If we locked up all depressed, bipolar, schizophrenic, etc people for life, it would save many lives lost due to murder and suicide. But we wouldn't do that because it would violate the rights of millions.

A person's right to live doesn't trump everything else under the sun.

Just to be clear . . . you equate the loss of being able to legally buy a semi-automatic with high capacity magazines and no background check or record that you have the gun . . . to being locked up in a mental institution, or government sanctioned religious discrimination?

See, this is why it's not possible to have a reasonable discussion.  That's a patently unreasonable position that you're starting from.

Equal to? Perhaps not. But certainly similar. Locking up someone for having depression would be a HUGE violation of their rights. Locking up someone for owing a gun you dislike is a slightly less huge violation, but they are comparable.

And no, I am not the reason we can't have a reasonable discussion. You have led me to believe that you (and many others, in my experience) believe that the only rights anyone has are the rights that politicians currently say they do. So your side absolutely cannot be trusted. At all.

Gin1984

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1223 on: June 14, 2016, 07:07:12 AM »
When people mention that nobody's coming for your guns, what they mean are the many types of guns that would remain unregulated.  Your revolvers, shotguns, derringers, muskets, bolt action hunting rifles, etc would likely all remain unaffected.  This type of limited weapons ban would follow the same precedent where you can't buy a nuke because it's been determined that it's too dangerous.

It may well take fifty or a hundred years until a sales ban becomes effective in minimizing the availability of particular weapons, so it's not an ideal solution.  Better solutions would be to implement skill based licensing, mental health checks, background checks for every weapon sold, exclusions for people currently on terrorist watch-lists, databases of gun owners that can easily be cross-referenced by law enforcement, etc.  Many of those have been partially and half-assedly implemented already . . . it would just be a matter of improving what already exists.

Skill based licensing? So that mass shooters would be even better trained? Obviously these people are pretty skilled with their weapons, judging by the death toll.
Background checks - San Bernadino, Orlando, Dylan Roof, etc. - these people passed all of the current background checks required in this country. What makes you think they wouldn't be able to pass a skill test?
Cross referencing gun owners...? none of these people committed massive crimes before their shoot-outs, which is why they were able to buy their guns legally, with a full background check. Hell, the FBI runs the NICS database at the moment; how much more could you really add?


Do you have any suggestions that are not currently being used that would prevent mass shootings? California has some of the strictest gun laws in the country; still had a mass shooting. Several, actually. 

I understand that there are small windows for improvements in the current laws, but almost none of them would stop any of the latest mass shootings.

Rounding up and banning semi-automatic weapons is right up there with rounding up and banning Muslims. They would have similar reductions in public terror attacks in the United States, and be similarly encroaching upon people's rights.
Start taking domestic violence seriously and make it illegal for those who have abused others to get guns.  And no banning a weapon is in no way similar to banning a person.

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1224 on: June 14, 2016, 07:11:03 AM »
I hesitate to comment on this kind of thread.  372 mass (4 or more injured or killed) shootings in the US for 2015.  More mass shootings than days in the yr!.  Can't forget about the more than 26,000 injured and 13,000 other victims shot dead each yr.   Where is their right to live?  It's unbelievable sad.

I know I know,  someone will now tell me about car deaths and why not ban them.  But seriously, other countries just shake their heads and can't understand the US gun culture.  Some tourists ARE afraid of stepping inside America in fear that they will be shot  Mexico is surely safer....

Mexico had a murder rate that was 3x the USA's in 2011. According to wikipedia that rate is currently 5x the United States rate, per capita. A surprisingly large number of American tourists were killed there and the USA has a travel advisory warning Americans planning on going there.


Just to be clear . . . you equate the loss of being able to legally buy a semi-automatic with high capacity magazines and no background check or record that you have the gun . . . to being locked up in a mental institution, or government sanctioned religious discrimination?

See, this is why it's not possible to have a reasonable discussion.  That's a patently unreasonable position that you're starting from.

It's more unreasonable to assume you can increase security without decreasing liberty. There is a tradeoff. Some people find it far easier to sacrifice one or the other, but there is a tradeoff. The reason discussions like this are hard is that people do not discuss this aspect - winkeyman clearly is less willing to sacrifice security for the sake of increased liberty. You appear to be the opposite.

But rather than discuss this, please continue to argue over and over again about how dumb/blind/shortsighted the other side is while making ad hominem and strawman arguments in an attempt to dismiss their perspective while simultaneously asserting your intellectual and moral superiority.


ender

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1225 on: June 14, 2016, 07:17:57 AM »
Start taking domestic violence seriously and make it illegal for those who have abused others to get guns.  And no banning a weapon is in no way similar to banning a person.

The problem is enforcement.

I have the same problem with people who are clearly drunks (multiple DUIs, accidents, revoked license) who then kill someone while driving drunk, in spite of a million reasons they shouldn't be. It happens somewhat often and I don't know what to do about it, but it infuriates me to no end that it is so trivially easy for someone in that situation to still drive and endanger others.

I think that for guns, it would be easier to accomplish. Make it incredibly illegal and painful to anyone who sells a gun to someone who is not supposed to have one. Make it so that anyone selling a gun who does not do any due diligence goes to jail. And make that due diligence easier on sellers so that it's not a logistical nightmare to try to do.

It won't stop everything, but it will at the very least make people more aware of how important it is to be aware of who they are selling to. Right now, it's a bit of "don't ask don't tell" for things.

Midwest

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1226 on: June 14, 2016, 07:20:36 AM »
When people mention that nobody's coming for your guns, what they mean are the many types of guns that would remain unregulated.  Your revolvers, shotguns, derringers, muskets, bolt action hunting rifles, etc would likely all remain unaffected.  This type of limited weapons ban would follow the same precedent where you can't buy a nuke because it's been determined that it's too dangerous.

It may well take fifty or a hundred years until a sales ban becomes effective in minimizing the availability of particular weapons, so it's not an ideal solution.  Better solutions would be to implement skill based licensing, mental health checks, background checks for every weapon sold, exclusions for people currently on terrorist watch-lists, databases of gun owners that can easily be cross-referenced by law enforcement, etc.  Many of those have been partially and half-assedly implemented already . . . it would just be a matter of improving what already exists.

Skill based licensing? So that mass shooters would be even better trained? Obviously these people are pretty skilled with their weapons, judging by the death toll.
Background checks - San Bernadino, Orlando, Dylan Roof, etc. - these people passed all of the current background checks required in this country. What makes you think they wouldn't be able to pass a skill test?
Cross referencing gun owners...? none of these people committed massive crimes before their shoot-outs, which is why they were able to buy their guns legally, with a full background check. Hell, the FBI runs the NICS database at the moment; how much more could you really add?


Do you have any suggestions that are not currently being used that would prevent mass shootings? California has some of the strictest gun laws in the country; still had a mass shooting. Several, actually. 

I understand that there are small windows for improvements in the current laws, but almost none of them would stop any of the latest mass shootings.

Rounding up and banning semi-automatic weapons is right up there with rounding up and banning Muslims. They would have similar reductions in public terror attacks in the United States, and be similarly encroaching upon people's rights.
Start taking domestic violence seriously and make it illegal for those who have abused others to get guns.  And no banning a weapon is in no way similar to banning a person.

I thought those convicted of domestic abuse were already prohibited from buying or possessing firearms.

GuitarStv

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1227 on: June 14, 2016, 07:32:59 AM »
When people mention that nobody's coming for your guns, what they mean are the many types of guns that would remain unregulated.  Your revolvers, shotguns, derringers, muskets, bolt action hunting rifles, etc would likely all remain unaffected.  This type of limited weapons ban would follow the same precedent where you can't buy a nuke because it's been determined that it's too dangerous.

It may well take fifty or a hundred years until a sales ban becomes effective in minimizing the availability of particular weapons, so it's not an ideal solution.  Better solutions would be to implement skill based licensing, mental health checks, background checks for every weapon sold, exclusions for people currently on terrorist watch-lists, databases of gun owners that can easily be cross-referenced by law enforcement, etc.  Many of those have been partially and half-assedly implemented already . . . it would just be a matter of improving what already exists.

Skill based licensing? So that mass shooters would be even better trained? Obviously these people are pretty skilled with their weapons, judging by the death toll.
Background checks - San Bernadino, Orlando, Dylan Roof, etc. - these people passed all of the current background checks required in this country. What makes you think they wouldn't be able to pass a skill test?
Cross referencing gun owners...? none of these people committed massive crimes before their shoot-outs, which is why they were able to buy their guns legally, with a full background check. Hell, the FBI runs the NICS database at the moment; how much more could you really add?


Do you have any suggestions that are not currently being used that would prevent mass shootings? California has some of the strictest gun laws in the country; still had a mass shooting. Several, actually. 

I understand that there are small windows for improvements in the current laws, but almost none of them would stop any of the latest mass shootings.

Rounding up and banning semi-automatic weapons is right up there with rounding up and banning Muslims. They would have similar reductions in public terror attacks in the United States, and be similarly encroaching upon people's rights.
Start taking domestic violence seriously and make it illegal for those who have abused others to get guns.  And no banning a weapon is in no way similar to banning a person.

I thought those convicted of domestic abuse were already prohibited from buying or possessing firearms.

Nobody's prevented from buying a firearm through a private sale.  No background check, no asking for ID, no records.

Midwest

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1228 on: June 14, 2016, 07:36:44 AM »
When people mention that nobody's coming for your guns, what they mean are the many types of guns that would remain unregulated.  Your revolvers, shotguns, derringers, muskets, bolt action hunting rifles, etc would likely all remain unaffected.  This type of limited weapons ban would follow the same precedent where you can't buy a nuke because it's been determined that it's too dangerous.

It may well take fifty or a hundred years until a sales ban becomes effective in minimizing the availability of particular weapons, so it's not an ideal solution.  Better solutions would be to implement skill based licensing, mental health checks, background checks for every weapon sold, exclusions for people currently on terrorist watch-lists, databases of gun owners that can easily be cross-referenced by law enforcement, etc.  Many of those have been partially and half-assedly implemented already . . . it would just be a matter of improving what already exists.

Skill based licensing? So that mass shooters would be even better trained? Obviously these people are pretty skilled with their weapons, judging by the death toll.
Background checks - San Bernadino, Orlando, Dylan Roof, etc. - these people passed all of the current background checks required in this country. What makes you think they wouldn't be able to pass a skill test?
Cross referencing gun owners...? none of these people committed massive crimes before their shoot-outs, which is why they were able to buy their guns legally, with a full background check. Hell, the FBI runs the NICS database at the moment; how much more could you really add?


Do you have any suggestions that are not currently being used that would prevent mass shootings? California has some of the strictest gun laws in the country; still had a mass shooting. Several, actually. 

I understand that there are small windows for improvements in the current laws, but almost none of them would stop any of the latest mass shootings.

Rounding up and banning semi-automatic weapons is right up there with rounding up and banning Muslims. They would have similar reductions in public terror attacks in the United States, and be similarly encroaching upon people's rights.
Start taking domestic violence seriously and make it illegal for those who have abused others to get guns.  And no banning a weapon is in no way similar to banning a person.

I thought those convicted of domestic abuse were already prohibited from buying or possessing firearms.

Nobody's prevented from buying a firearm through a private sale.  No background check, no asking for ID, no records.

The prohibited person who bought the gun in a private sale, however, has still committed a crime by buying and possessing the gun. 

GuitarStv

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1229 on: June 14, 2016, 07:42:33 AM »
When people mention that nobody's coming for your guns, what they mean are the many types of guns that would remain unregulated.  Your revolvers, shotguns, derringers, muskets, bolt action hunting rifles, etc would likely all remain unaffected.  This type of limited weapons ban would follow the same precedent where you can't buy a nuke because it's been determined that it's too dangerous.

It may well take fifty or a hundred years until a sales ban becomes effective in minimizing the availability of particular weapons, so it's not an ideal solution.  Better solutions would be to implement skill based licensing, mental health checks, background checks for every weapon sold, exclusions for people currently on terrorist watch-lists, databases of gun owners that can easily be cross-referenced by law enforcement, etc.  Many of those have been partially and half-assedly implemented already . . . it would just be a matter of improving what already exists.

Skill based licensing? So that mass shooters would be even better trained? Obviously these people are pretty skilled with their weapons, judging by the death toll.
Background checks - San Bernadino, Orlando, Dylan Roof, etc. - these people passed all of the current background checks required in this country. What makes you think they wouldn't be able to pass a skill test?
Cross referencing gun owners...? none of these people committed massive crimes before their shoot-outs, which is why they were able to buy their guns legally, with a full background check. Hell, the FBI runs the NICS database at the moment; how much more could you really add?


Do you have any suggestions that are not currently being used that would prevent mass shootings? California has some of the strictest gun laws in the country; still had a mass shooting. Several, actually. 

I understand that there are small windows for improvements in the current laws, but almost none of them would stop any of the latest mass shootings.

Rounding up and banning semi-automatic weapons is right up there with rounding up and banning Muslims. They would have similar reductions in public terror attacks in the United States, and be similarly encroaching upon people's rights.
Start taking domestic violence seriously and make it illegal for those who have abused others to get guns.  And no banning a weapon is in no way similar to banning a person.

I thought those convicted of domestic abuse were already prohibited from buying or possessing firearms.

Nobody's prevented from buying a firearm through a private sale.  No background check, no asking for ID, no records.

The prohibited person who bought the gun in a private sale, however, has still committed a crime by buying and possessing the gun.

As long as your goal is to have more people breaking the law in ways that the police have no hope of catching (rather than keeping guns out of the hands of people who would be dangerous with them) then I guess it all works out.

Midwest

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1230 on: June 14, 2016, 07:56:35 AM »

Nobody's prevented from buying a firearm through a private sale.  No background check, no asking for ID, no records.

The prohibited person who bought the gun in a private sale, however, has still committed a crime by buying and possessing the gun.

As long as your goal is to have more people breaking the law in ways that the police have no hope of catching (rather than keeping guns out of the hands of people who would be dangerous with them) then I guess it all works out.

We had a poster above claim that people convicted of domestic violence could legally possess guns.  That is false.  It is illegal under current law.

If I understand correctly, you're argument is that because they didn't obey the first law, we should create a 2nd law for them to follow?

randymarsh

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1231 on: June 14, 2016, 09:45:26 AM »
Aren't you prohibited from having guns just from being charged with DV? I swear I've heard that's the case.
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Chris22

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1232 on: June 14, 2016, 09:53:10 AM »
Aren't you prohibited from having guns just from being charged with DV? I swear I've heard that's the case.

I don't know the laws specifically, but I do know that when I was in the military 10 years ago, everyone had to certify via written statement before the annual weapons qualifying range shoots that they were not convicted or charged with DV, because if they were, just handing them a weapon was a crime for the person doing the handing. 
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GuitarStv

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1233 on: June 14, 2016, 09:53:50 AM »

Nobody's prevented from buying a firearm through a private sale.  No background check, no asking for ID, no records.

The prohibited person who bought the gun in a private sale, however, has still committed a crime by buying and possessing the gun.

As long as your goal is to have more people breaking the law in ways that the police have no hope of catching (rather than keeping guns out of the hands of people who would be dangerous with them) then I guess it all works out.

We had a poster above claim that people convicted of domestic violence could legally possess guns.  That is false.  It is illegal under current law.

If I understand correctly, you're argument is that because they didn't obey the first law, we should create a 2nd law for them to follow?

No.

Right now people who aren't supposed to own guns are expected to follow the honour system when buying through private sale.

It would be better if every sale of a gun had to get ID, a background check, and was recorded.

JLee

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1234 on: June 14, 2016, 09:58:05 AM »
Aren't you prohibited from having guns just from being charged with DV? I swear I've heard that's the case.

Laws vary by state; some require that firearms be turned over if a restraining order is in place. I'm not sure about laws regarding a pending charge, but as that often comes with a restraining order I wouldn't be surprised.

Cyaphas

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1235 on: June 14, 2016, 10:00:55 AM »

Freedom of speech is clearly implicated in ~20,000 homicides a year?


Hate speech is one of the reasons ISIS and the Taliban are doing so well.
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mak1277

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1236 on: June 14, 2016, 10:02:04 AM »

Right now people who aren't supposed to own guns are expected to follow the honour system when buying through private sale.

It would be better if every sale of a gun had to get ID, a background check, and was recorded.

I'm an NRA member who agrees with this, at least conceptually.  The trouble comes when people start arguing over what information on the background check makes it ok or not ok to own a gun. 

And even if you do enact legislation like that, you STILL will have the problem of both buyer & seller not respecting the law, so you don't have perfect elimination of the honor system concept.


GuitarStv

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1237 on: June 14, 2016, 10:05:54 AM »

Right now people who aren't supposed to own guns are expected to follow the honour system when buying through private sale.

It would be better if every sale of a gun had to get ID, a background check, and was recorded.

I'm an NRA member who agrees with this, at least conceptually.  The trouble comes when people start arguing over what information on the background check makes it ok or not ok to own a gun. 

And even if you do enact legislation like that, you STILL will have the problem of both buyer & seller not respecting the law, so you don't have perfect elimination of the honor system concept.

When you add a second person into the mix, it's not perfect . . . but it's a much better way of going about things.  If there's a list of guns/gun owners, then the person who sells the gun knows he can be held accountable for his actions if he fails to obey the law.  Not perfect, but a little extra safety for virtually no loss of liberty.

robartsd

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1238 on: June 14, 2016, 10:25:55 AM »
Well, then.  I guess there still is a pattern here worth taking note of.  All of the newsworthy shootings that have occurred in my recent memory have all occurred in locations wherein personally owned firearms were actually banned.
I'm not sure that guns were banned at the Auroa, CO theater where the 2012 Batman movie shooting occured. Of course the gunman there used the dark theater and smoke to provide concealment while atacking a group that was fully distracted by a movie that has scenes where the sound of a gunshot might be expected.

I'm an NRA member who agrees with this, at least conceptually.  The trouble comes when people start arguing over what information on the background check makes it ok or not ok to own a gun. 

And even if you do enact legislation like that, you STILL will have the problem of both buyer & seller not respecting the law, so you don't have perfect elimination of the honor system concept.
I would be fully supportive of laws requiring gun owners to have a permit to own guns provided that: there is no cost to the gun owner to obtain a permit and the only reasons for denying the permit are violent history; mental illness; or incompetence at safe use, handling, and storage. If this were the law, I would personally apply for a permit even though I am very unlikely to purchase a gun (cost/benefit of gun ownership is not satisfactory to me - I don't hunt or particularly enjoy shooting sports, but am not disinterested in the concept of having armed citizen defenders arround me). If the license also served as government issued photo ID, I'd probably use it as my primary ID card except when driving. Private gun sales would be fine as long as the seller verifies the buyer's ID and permit.

Gin1984

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1239 on: June 14, 2016, 11:01:27 AM »
When people mention that nobody's coming for your guns, what they mean are the many types of guns that would remain unregulated.  Your revolvers, shotguns, derringers, muskets, bolt action hunting rifles, etc would likely all remain unaffected.  This type of limited weapons ban would follow the same precedent where you can't buy a nuke because it's been determined that it's too dangerous.

It may well take fifty or a hundred years until a sales ban becomes effective in minimizing the availability of particular weapons, so it's not an ideal solution.  Better solutions would be to implement skill based licensing, mental health checks, background checks for every weapon sold, exclusions for people currently on terrorist watch-lists, databases of gun owners that can easily be cross-referenced by law enforcement, etc.  Many of those have been partially and half-assedly implemented already . . . it would just be a matter of improving what already exists.

Skill based licensing? So that mass shooters would be even better trained? Obviously these people are pretty skilled with their weapons, judging by the death toll.
Background checks - San Bernadino, Orlando, Dylan Roof, etc. - these people passed all of the current background checks required in this country. What makes you think they wouldn't be able to pass a skill test?
Cross referencing gun owners...? none of these people committed massive crimes before their shoot-outs, which is why they were able to buy their guns legally, with a full background check. Hell, the FBI runs the NICS database at the moment; how much more could you really add?


Do you have any suggestions that are not currently being used that would prevent mass shootings? California has some of the strictest gun laws in the country; still had a mass shooting. Several, actually. 

I understand that there are small windows for improvements in the current laws, but almost none of them would stop any of the latest mass shootings.

Rounding up and banning semi-automatic weapons is right up there with rounding up and banning Muslims. They would have similar reductions in public terror attacks in the United States, and be similarly encroaching upon people's rights.
Start taking domestic violence seriously and make it illegal for those who have abused others to get guns.  And no banning a weapon is in no way similar to banning a person.

I thought those convicted of domestic abuse were already prohibited from buying or possessing firearms.
Depends on the state....which is a problem.  As is them having them when they are charged, because it is one of the most likely times for a victim to be shot.   

Gin1984

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1240 on: June 14, 2016, 11:03:23 AM »
Aren't you prohibited from having guns just from being charged with DV? I swear I've heard that's the case.
In most states no. 

Midwest

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1241 on: June 14, 2016, 11:05:08 AM »
Aren't you prohibited from having guns just from being charged with DV? I swear I've heard that's the case.
In most states no.

But you are clearly prohibited after being convicted.

GuitarStv

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1242 on: June 14, 2016, 11:09:45 AM »
Aren't you prohibited from having guns just from being charged with DV? I swear I've heard that's the case.
In most states no.

But you are clearly prohibited after being convicted.

Prohibiting someone from owning a weapon is utterly pointless if that person can still easily buy the weapon.

Midwest

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1243 on: June 14, 2016, 11:20:29 AM »
Aren't you prohibited from having guns just from being charged with DV? I swear I've heard that's the case.
In most states no.

But you are clearly prohibited after being convicted.

Prohibiting someone from owning a weapon is utterly pointless if that person can still easily buy the weapon.

Steve - Again, the poster started with a narrative that it should be illegal for DV abusers to possess a firearm.  It is. 

If laws are unenforceable as you claim, why have laws at all?  A prohibited person in possession of a firearm is a crime.  If the govt catches them with it, they have a problem just like any other crime.

While I agree that prohibiting transfers between private parties would make it difficult for all prohibited persons to obtain firearms, some of the proposals have included limitations loaning guns to friends, etc. (friends who can legally possess a firearm) which is a stupid idea.  In addition, many in the US are against a registry. 

In all honesty, if there was way to check a private sale w/o creating a registry and providing an easy way to prove a gun had been transferred for the seller I would support that. 

I would also support the much simpler step of setting a limit on annual sales by non FFL persons.  I suspect a lot of the transfers you are concerned about occur through a smaller number of individuals.  Since FFL dealers are required to do a background check, the number of transfers w/o a background check should go down.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2016, 11:23:00 AM by Midwest »

Gin1984

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1244 on: June 14, 2016, 11:22:21 AM »
Aren't you prohibited from having guns just from being charged with DV? I swear I've heard that's the case.
In most states no.

But you are clearly prohibited after being convicted.
Actually no: Florida has no law prohibiting individuals convicted of domestic violence misdemeanors from purchasing or possessing firearms or ammunition.  Just took the most recent state and googled.  Also keep in mind many DV cases never get to court because the police don't take them seriously (may have to do with the fact that cops as a profession have the highest incident rate) and the shooter did abuse his wife but was never convicted.   

Gin1984

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1245 on: June 14, 2016, 11:25:13 AM »
And in regard to the only federal law it is if and only if the person "has the use or attempted use of physical force or threatened use of a deadly weapon as an element".  In addition, the offender must:
Be a current or former spouse, parent, or guardian of the victim;
Share a child in common with the victim;
Be a current or former cohabitant with the victim as a spouse, parent or guardian; or
Be similarly situated to a spouse, parent or guardian of the victim.3
Note also that a conviction requires that the offender was represented by counsel or waived the right to counsel and was tried by a jury or waived the right to a jury, if the offense entitled the offender to a jury trial.

Midwest

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1246 on: June 14, 2016, 11:27:52 AM »
Aren't you prohibited from having guns just from being charged with DV? I swear I've heard that's the case.
In most states no.

But you are clearly prohibited after being convicted.
Actually no: Florida has no law prohibiting individuals convicted of domestic violence misdemeanors from purchasing or possessing firearms or ammunition.  Just took the most recent state and googled.  Also keep in mind many DV cases never get to court because the police don't take them seriously (may have to do with the fact that cops as a profession have the highest incident rate) and the shooter did abuse his wife but was never convicted.   

Florida doesn't need a separate statue, It's a federal law.

https://www.atf.gov/resource-center/docs/report/misdemeanor-crimes-domestic-violence-and-federal-firearms-prohibitions/download

I'll anticipate your next question - Felons are generally prohibited from possessing firearms as well.  This would include those convicted of felony DV.

With regard non-charged/non-convicted crimes, we live in a society of innocent until proven guilty.

If we want to start looking at prohibiting people who are being investigated, this is an interesting article. - http://thefederalist.com/2016/06/13/hillary-people-under-fbi-investigation-should-lose-constitutional-rights/

Gin1984

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1247 on: June 14, 2016, 11:33:53 AM »
Aren't you prohibited from having guns just from being charged with DV? I swear I've heard that's the case.
In most states no.

But you are clearly prohibited after being convicted.
Actually no: Florida has no law prohibiting individuals convicted of domestic violence misdemeanors from purchasing or possessing firearms or ammunition.  Just took the most recent state and googled.  Also keep in mind many DV cases never get to court because the police don't take them seriously (may have to do with the fact that cops as a profession have the highest incident rate) and the shooter did abuse his wife but was never convicted.   

Florida doesn't need a separate statue, It's a federal law.

https://www.atf.gov/resource-center/docs/report/misdemeanor-crimes-domestic-violence-and-federal-firearms-prohibitions/download

I'll anticipate your next question - Felons are generally prohibited from possessing firearms as well.  This would include those convicted of felony DV.

With regard non-charged/non-convicted crimes, we live in a society of innocent until proven guilty.

If we want to start looking at prohibiting people who are being investigated, this is an interesting article. - http://thefederalist.com/2016/06/13/hillary-people-under-fbi-investigation-should-lose-constitutional-rights/
See one post above you. And most DVs are considered not considered felonies.  And given we have no problem putting people in jail once they have been charged with a crime, not convicted, I don't see how this should be treated any different.  Also investigated is different than charged.

GuitarStv

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1248 on: June 14, 2016, 11:37:13 AM »
Aren't you prohibited from having guns just from being charged with DV? I swear I've heard that's the case.
In most states no.

But you are clearly prohibited after being convicted.

Prohibiting someone from owning a weapon is utterly pointless if that person can still easily buy the weapon.

If laws are unenforceable as you claim, why have laws at all?  A prohibited person in possession of a firearm is a crime.  If the govt catches them with it, they have a problem just like any other crime.

Laws are perfectly enforceable.  They're enforced when someone buys a gun from a licensed dealer.  They're enforced to increase a sentence after a person uses a gun to commit a crime.

The law should be enforced every time a gun is sold.


While I agree that prohibiting transfers between private parties would make it difficult for all prohibited persons to obtain firearms, some of the proposals have included limitations loaning guns to friends, etc. (friends who can legally possess a firearm) which is a stupid idea. 

That does sound stupid.  As long as you've done a check on your friend and know that he/she can legally posses a firearm I don't see any reason that lending a gun to someone else would be an issue.


In addition, many in the US are against a registry. 

Their arguments should be heard and then decided upon.  They shouldn't be able to hold the chance of any change for better hostage by being really loud though.


In all honesty, if there was way to check a private sale w/o creating a registry and providing an easy way to prove a gun had been transferred for the seller I would support that.

So as long as there's no possible way for it to happen you support it?  :P


I would also support the much simpler step of setting a limit on annual sales by non FFL persons.  I suspect a lot of the transfers you are concerned about occur through a smaller number of individuals.  Since FFL dealers are required to do a background check, the number of transfers w/o a background check should go down.

If you don't know who has firearms, you can't implement or enforce this either.

Midwest

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1249 on: June 14, 2016, 11:42:34 AM »
Aren't you prohibited from having guns just from being charged with DV? I swear I've heard that's the case.
In most states no.

But you are clearly prohibited after being convicted.
Actually no: Florida has no law prohibiting individuals convicted of domestic violence misdemeanors from purchasing or possessing firearms or ammunition.  Just took the most recent state and googled.  Also keep in mind many DV cases never get to court because the police don't take them seriously (may have to do with the fact that cops as a profession have the highest incident rate) and the shooter did abuse his wife but was never convicted.   

Florida doesn't need a separate statue, It's a federal law.

https://www.atf.gov/resource-center/docs/report/misdemeanor-crimes-domestic-violence-and-federal-firearms-prohibitions/download

I'll anticipate your next question - Felons are generally prohibited from possessing firearms as well.  This would include those convicted of felony DV.

With regard non-charged/non-convicted crimes, we live in a society of innocent until proven guilty.

If we want to start looking at prohibiting people who are being investigated, this is an interesting article. - http://thefederalist.com/2016/06/13/hillary-people-under-fbi-investigation-should-lose-constitutional-rights/
See one post above you. And most DVs are considered not considered felonies.  And given we have no problem putting people in jail once they have been charged with a crime, not convicted, I don't see how this should be treated any different.  Also investigated is different than charged.

Gin - I was the jury foreman on a DV case.  if you beat the shit out of your spouse, it's felony battery in my state.  The case I was on (we convicted him), he punched the girlfriend one time while they were both high on crack and received a 6 year sentence with a felony conviction.

I suspect the reason that most DV are misdemeanors is because they are minor incidents.  You're right people sometimes get away with DV.  The system isn't perfect but the alternative is to take away rights from people w/o a jury trial or even after they are exonerated.  That's a much worse alternative.

My point stands, those convicted of DV lose their rights in nearly all cases with a conviction.  If someone is charged, I don't believe they should permanently lose their rights.