Author Topic: A very cheesy problem  (Read 6814 times)

marty998

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A very cheesy problem
« on: September 03, 2016, 01:36:51 AM »
So I've been having a few issues of late. A continuous bout of smelly, repeating, just downright awful flatulence.

I have been racking my brain trying to figure out what has happened... because for all intents and purposes I had not changed my diet in the past few months. The same cereals and bread in the morning, the same vegemite and cheese sandwiches for lunch, the same mince, chicken, beef and pork curries with salad and veg for dinner.

Came home from the gym this afternoon, opened the fridge and it hit me. The cheese!!! My beautiful, yummy, scrum-diddly-umptuous Mainland Colby Melt & Mild Cheese!

The smell from it was... suspiciously similar to... well you know.

I do not want to give up this cheese. I paid $13 for it, and there is still half a block left. I consider it my indulgence for lunch. I also see this as my way of supporting Aussie farmers, instead of buying the cheap processed crap like I used to.

What do I do?

Do I stop eating it and throw it out?
Do I write to the manufacturer saying how much I love it but can't have it because it embarrasses me at work?
Do I tolerate it and try and break my wind at opportune times alone?

Help me guys!!!

ahoy

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2016, 01:58:08 AM »
Hmmm... yes, well.... an interesting question for an early retirement blog.

marty998

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2016, 02:21:22 AM »
I'm actually interested to hear a remedy. Countless time the wisdom of this forum has extended well beyond retirement questions :D

Astatine

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2016, 02:37:56 AM »
A friend is lactose intolerant. She occasionally uses lactase tablets (which contain enzymes which break down lactose) if she wants to eat dairy. The tablets aren't a miracle cure - she still gets symptoms, just less of them. Could be worth a try?

citrustea

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2016, 02:54:46 AM »
I always thought mainland was a New Zealand company if that helps with the supporting Aussie farmers bit 🤔.
Maybe try Devondale or Bega?
(Or try the other replies for more helpful options.)

happy

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2016, 03:20:51 AM »
Firstly I'd stop eating the cheese and notice if the flatulance goes away.  Then try it again and observe if it comes back. Then stop it again and observe. n=1 study. That way you know if its the cheese.

There is not much lactose in hard cheese, so I'd be surprised if it was that...you could use the lactase tabs, and see, but it'd be cheaper just to toss it out.

marty998

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2016, 03:56:11 AM »
I always thought mainland was a New Zealand company if that helps with the supporting Aussie farmers bit 🤔.
Maybe try Devondale or Bega?
(Or try the other replies for more helpful options.)

TIL. Great. First they beat us at Rugby, then they make nicer cheese than us :D

Lets stop for a week. if no change then we move onto the tablets!

WerKater

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2016, 03:58:18 AM »
Firstly I'd stop eating the cheese and notice if the flatulance goes away.  Then try it again and observe if it comes back. Then stop it again and observe. n=1 study. That way you know if its the cheese.
+1
First, be scientific about it and figure out for sure whether the cheese is actually the problem.

Goldielocks

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2016, 08:22:14 AM »
Firstly I'd stop eating the cheese and notice if the flatulance goes away.  Then try it again and observe if it comes back. Then stop it again and observe. n=1 study. That way you know if its the cheese.
+1
First, be scientific about it and figure out for sure whether the cheese is actually the problem.

You could see a naturopath.  After 2 months with naturopath, we not only identified the culprits, but after rebalancing my system, I was able to eat many of my favorite foods again -- just not all on the same day.

I found a combination of the "intolerance" foods with too much sugar or simple carbs in my diet for a few days was the trigger.  It was not just the foods alone.

-----

ETA -- For now, FREEZE the cheese.
« Last Edit: September 03, 2016, 09:10:43 AM by goldielocks »

ltt

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2016, 09:00:02 AM »
My guess is that it is not the cheese, as cheese has very little, if any, carbs in it.  (You haven't mentioned how old you are.)  But rather those items that have the carbs--the breads, cereals, the starchy vegetables--are the culprit in this matter.

abhe8

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #10 on: September 03, 2016, 09:18:38 AM »
I have a similar problem with eating to much sugar or carbs.

ysette9

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #11 on: September 03, 2016, 03:17:23 PM »
It certainly can be a lactose intolerance problem. I developed a very bad case about half-way through my twenties. To do a test you have to be VERY vigilant and eliminate all sources of dairy from your diet for at least a week. Cheese, yogurt, butter, etc. Read labels carefully because most processed food is made with dairy, even things you would never expect. Pretty much all baked goods are out, almost all deserts, many chocolates, obviously things like cream cheese and ice cream.

I have found the tablets to help ease symptoms but are definitely not a cure-all. The best thing is to just eliminate dairy from your diet. In the US we have Cabot Creamery which makes lactose-free cheeses. You will want to ask you favorite cheese person at a local, upscale grocery store for lactose-free cheese recommendations. There are a few out there but not many. Do not take the advice of some who will say that hard cheeses don't have lactose. They have LESS lactose than fresh cheeses but they absolutely still do have some. I had one cheese lady actually argue with me on that point because her cheese school training told her that aged cheeses had no lactose. It took a lot of self restraint for me to tell her off and explain in great detail what happens to me when I eat aged cheese that supposedly have no lactose.


ysette9

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #12 on: September 03, 2016, 03:18:35 PM »
In an interesting twist of fate, having s baby and nursing said baby switched my body so that now I can tolerate low levels of lactose again. That opens up the world of hard cheeses again though things like sour cream are still too much. You could always give lactating a try. :-)

mustachepungoeshere

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #13 on: September 03, 2016, 03:29:33 PM »
You haven't mentioned how old you are.

He's old. Practically over the hill!

(He's 30.)

Sailor Sam

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2016, 04:08:28 PM »
You haven't mentioned how old you are.

He's old. Practically over the hill!

(He's 30.)

When I was 30, my ability to eat dairy shut down entirely. I fought it for a while, but eventually the pain got bad enough to incentivize me to quit. Now, if I accidentally poison myself, I puke. Very unpleasant!

Please report back, after your experiments. I want to know if it really was the cheese.

marty998

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #15 on: September 03, 2016, 04:11:44 PM »
It's not all dairy.... been having cheese for decades without problems... it's definitely this particular brand that's doing it. But we're still in the 'testing' phase so I won't jump to conclusions yet ;)

My guess is that it is not the cheese, as cheese has very little, if any, carbs in it.  (You haven't mentioned how old you are.)  But rather those items that have the carbs--the breads, cereals, the starchy vegetables--are the culprit in this matter.

Breads and cereals? I thought the very high fibre diets cause all together different bowel problems!

marty998

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #16 on: September 04, 2016, 04:52:38 AM »
1st day off the 'foreign' cheese and things are better already.

Reduction in volume and aroma :P

I've switched back to plain cheddar... won't give up the yellow stuff entirely!

mustachepungoeshere

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #17 on: September 04, 2016, 05:51:41 AM »
Oh thank god, I can stop holding my breath!

(Not out of suspense, mind you, just ... self-preservation... :P)

marty998

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #18 on: September 04, 2016, 05:55:45 AM »
Cheesy cheeky sod you are lol.


Carless

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #19 on: September 04, 2016, 05:15:28 PM »
Properly aged artisan hard cheeses are nearly lactose free (ie the same levels of lactose as the factory made 'lactose free' cheeses).  The extruded fake 'cheese' blocks are full of lactose, and are solidified by means of a coagulant rather than fermenting the cheese, which breaks up the lactose molecule.  Read the nutrition label, lactose is a sugar so the percent sugar listed on the label is ~ the level of lactose.  If it's around 1% even a lactose intolerant person can tolerate it.  That's why cheese was invented; it's a way for people who are lactose intolerant (as was much of the population at that time) get nutrition from milk.

marty998

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #20 on: September 05, 2016, 01:28:24 AM »
Day 2 of no funky cheese...

Hypothesis confirmed, problem has sorted itself. Heading home on a crowded train with no fear.

I don't think I've ever eaten anything before that has had that direct an impact and effect.

Lesson learned.

Properly aged artisan hard cheeses are nearly lactose free (ie the same levels of lactose as the factory made 'lactose free' cheeses).  The extruded fake 'cheese' blocks are full of lactose, and are solidified by means of a coagulant rather than fermenting the cheese, which breaks up the lactose molecule.  Read the nutrition label, lactose is a sugar so the percent sugar listed on the label is ~ the level of lactose.  If it's around 1% even a lactose intolerant person can tolerate it.  That's why cheese was invented; it's a way for people who are lactose intolerant (as was much of the population at that time) get nutrition from milk.

Lesson #2 learned.

I love the variety of experts we have on the boards here :D

Sailor Sam

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #21 on: September 05, 2016, 01:25:39 PM »
A friend is lactose intolerant. She occasionally uses lactase tablets (which contain enzymes which break down lactose) if she wants to eat dairy. The tablets aren't a miracle cure - she still gets symptoms, just less of them. Could be worth a try?

As mentioned, normal cheese has virtually no lactose.  It is a pet peeve of my wife that people throw lactose intolerance around without much knowledge.   The process of making normal hard cheese consumes pretty much all the sugars from the final product.  It is a common misconception that lactose intolerance is related to digestive issues with cheese.

Fake cheese should be avoided for many reasons at all times.  Sorry if it is something you like.  :-)
Wait, can you clarify the statement about 'lactose intolerance being related to digestive issues with cheese'? Are you saying the general populace think lactose intolerance is relegated just to cheese? Or that the general populace doesn't understand lactose intolerant people can consume cheese?

If it's the former, I can get behind your statement. If it's the latter, then I guess I'm the exception to your wife's irritation. I definitely cannot eat even hard cheese without pain. Wish I could!

Lulee

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #22 on: September 05, 2016, 02:38:58 PM »
I donít consider myself to be truly lactose intolerant which would mean totally avoiding lactose just as someone with celiac's avoids gluten.  But my body struggles to consistently make sufficient lactase with the end result being that the level of this enzyme is unpredictably erratic.  Sometimes I can eat something without issue and a few days later, eating the same item in the same amount causes problems.  And this includes my much beloved extra sharp cheddar.

So I learned to pop Lactase pills whenever Iím having milk, cheese, sour cream, etc.  I do take more pills than normal if eating soft cheeses or larger quantities such as a meal of lasagna followed by an ice cream dessert.  Taking the pills and continuing to eat some milk or cheese most days keeps me at minimal issues.  It crept up on me with age and gotten worse bit by bit as I go along.  Another joy of getting older.

If you truly love that cheese, you could on days at home eat small amounts with a few lactase pills and see if you can at least have some once in awhile.

marty998

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #23 on: September 05, 2016, 03:05:11 PM »
I donít consider myself to be truly lactose intolerant which would mean totally avoiding lactose just as someone with celiac's avoids gluten.

A cranky cafe owner in Australia went on a bit of a rant yesterday about customers who order gluten free food.
He asked one of them if she had celiac's disease and the customer didn't not what that was!

Trendy hipsters lol. All getting out of hand.

happy

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #24 on: September 05, 2016, 05:14:17 PM »
Maybe, it is getting trendy. But there is also Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity, which is now recognised as a thing.

I'm not celiac, but any amount of gluten ( e.g. half a slice of bread) will give me terrible heartburn....I've self tested and tested it and its reproducible. I've been tested for celiac twice and know I'm not: this sparked me to do the reading around NCGS.

happy

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #25 on: September 05, 2016, 05:43:32 PM »
Some people are intolerant of casein, the common  dairy protein, which is in higher concentrations in cheese.

Since Marty998 seems to be only intolerant of this particular cheese, maybe he's reacting to the particular culture used in making this cheese?

PizzaSteve

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #26 on: September 05, 2016, 05:54:07 PM »
Some people are intolerant of casein, the common  dairy protein, which is in higher concentrations in cheese.

Since Marty998 seems to be only intolerant of this particular cheese, maybe he's reacting to the particular culture used in making this cheese?
Good point.  It is my guess that is a possible culprit for our friend above.  Getting tested to know for sure might help.  I don't wish stomach irritation on anyone.

Sailor Sam

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #27 on: September 05, 2016, 06:02:26 PM »
A friend is lactose intolerant. She occasionally uses lactase tablets (which contain enzymes which break down lactose) if she wants to eat dairy. The tablets aren't a miracle cure - she still gets symptoms, just less of them. Could be worth a try?

As mentioned, normal cheese has virtually no lactose.  It is a pet peeve of my wife that people throw lactose intolerance around without much knowledge.   The process of making normal hard cheese consumes pretty much all the sugars from the final product.  It is a common misconception that lactose intolerance is related to digestive issues with cheese.

Fake cheese should be avoided for many reasons at all times.  Sorry if it is something you like.  :-)
Wait, can you clarify the statement about 'lactose intolerance being related to digestive issues with cheese'? Are you saying the general populace think lactose intolerance is relegated just to cheese? Or that the general populace doesn't understand lactose intolerant people can consume cheese?

If it's the former, I can get behind your statement. If it's the latter, then I guess I'm the exception to your wife's irritation. I definitely cannot eat even hard cheese without pain. Wish I could!

Then what is bothering you is most likely not the lactose, but someone else, or you are extremely sensitive to extremely small quantities, beyond most people.  Lactose is a simple sugar.  Dairy solids include various other compounds that might irritate you, but I doubt in your case it is lactose.  Have you been specifically tested, or are you assuming it is lactose based on assuming it is in cheese, just like milk?

Ah, I finally see. You're saying that people who feel ill after eating cheese blame it on lactose intolerance, but in actuality is probably some other molecule irritating the stomach, because the amount of lactose in cheese is so small. For some reason my reading comprehension was low today.

I do react with very small amounts of dairy products. It may be a lactose intolerance, a casein allergy, or an unholy synergy between the two. I haven't specifically been tested, but I do know that all dairy products except ghee make me puke. I concede that for run of the mill lactose intolerance, cheese might still be consumable.

Precision in language is often important, but at the end of the day, even it some malady has become trendy, we kind of just have to believe people if they say some food makes them ill or uncomfortable. The exact mechanism of the discomfort might not matter all that much.   

PizzaSteve

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #28 on: September 05, 2016, 08:07:42 PM »
Good clues.  I believe the process of making ghee removes most dairy solids and lactose, with only the lipids remaining (my wife and I make it for cooking).  So dairy fats are ok for you, but the proteins, solids, and maybe the sugars are not. 

Thanks for the extra info.

JLR

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #29 on: September 05, 2016, 09:46:24 PM »
As others have said, you just have to choose the right cheese.

My husband and one of our sons are lactose intolerant. Our son loves cheese and eats it every day, but only tasty-style cheese. My husband used to love that apricot and almond soft cheese you can get (to put on a cheese platter). He was very happy to find that Liddells are now selling lactose-free cream cheese (generally available at Woolies and Coles). It is easy for me to turn it into the apricot and almond cheese he loved.

We also love Liddells sour cream and Zymil regular cream for putting in curries (but you can't whip it). We aren't big fans of the Liddells UHT cream. Too runny. Might as well just use milk.

With the lactose-free cream cheese and sour cream we can now make lactose-free cheesecake.

There is a lactose free vanilla ice cream by Peters (very nice!), and the So Good Chocolate Bliss soy ice cream by Sanitarium I can highly recommend.

Trudie

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #30 on: September 06, 2016, 03:11:02 PM »
Enjoy it on the weekends until it's gone.  Then fart to your heart's content.

Goldielocks

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #31 on: September 06, 2016, 03:37:52 PM »
Maybe, it is getting trendy. But there is also Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity, which is now recognised as a thing.

I'm not celiac, but any amount of gluten ( e.g. half a slice of bread) will give me terrible heartburn....I've self tested and tested it and its reproducible. I've been tested for celiac twice and know I'm not: this sparked me to do the reading around NCGS.

Yeah, but I bet you know what Celiac is... !

  I see the same hipsters around here...  All picky about gluten traces in their oatmeal and beer, yet chow down without issues on wheat flour nachos at happy hour.  Because they read "wheatbelly", but did not understand it or the problems...

The only good thing I can say about it, is that Celiacs and others with strong sensitivities now have a lot more options when eating outside of the home. 

libertarian4321

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #32 on: September 07, 2016, 03:32:45 AM »
So I've been having a few issues of late. A continuous bout of smelly, repeating, just downright awful flatulence.

I have been racking my brain trying to figure out what has happened... because for all intents and purposes I had not changed my diet in the past few months. The same cereals and bread in the morning, the same vegemite and cheese sandwiches for lunch, the same mince, chicken, beef and pork curries with salad and veg for dinner.

Came home from the gym this afternoon, opened the fridge and it hit me. The cheese!!! My beautiful, yummy, scrum-diddly-umptuous Mainland Colby Melt & Mild Cheese!

The smell from it was... suspiciously similar to... well you know.

I do not want to give up this cheese. I paid $13 for it, and there is still half a block left. I consider it my indulgence for lunch. I also see this as my way of supporting Aussie farmers, instead of buying the cheap processed crap like I used to.

What do I do?

Do I stop eating it and throw it out?
Do I write to the manufacturer saying how much I love it but can't have it because it embarrasses me at work?
Do I tolerate it and try and break my wind at opportune times alone?

Help me guys!!!

Wait for a weekend when you won't have to go out.  Then just sit down and finish it.  Enjoy.

Then just let it fly.  Stew in your own gases for a few hours.

Make sure you open all the windows first.

marty998

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Re: A very cheesy problem
« Reply #33 on: September 07, 2016, 04:58:30 AM »
So I've been having a few issues of late. A continuous bout of smelly, repeating, just downright awful flatulence.

I have been racking my brain trying to figure out what has happened... because for all intents and purposes I had not changed my diet in the past few months. The same cereals and bread in the morning, the same vegemite and cheese sandwiches for lunch, the same mince, chicken, beef and pork curries with salad and veg for dinner.

Came home from the gym this afternoon, opened the fridge and it hit me. The cheese!!! My beautiful, yummy, scrum-diddly-umptuous Mainland Colby Melt & Mild Cheese!

The smell from it was... suspiciously similar to... well you know.

I do not want to give up this cheese. I paid $13 for it, and there is still half a block left. I consider it my indulgence for lunch. I also see this as my way of supporting Aussie farmers, instead of buying the cheap processed crap like I used to.

What do I do?

Do I stop eating it and throw it out?
Do I write to the manufacturer saying how much I love it but can't have it because it embarrasses me at work?
Do I tolerate it and try and break my wind at opportune times alone?

Help me guys!!!

Wait for a weekend when you won't have to go out.  Then just sit down and finish it.  Enjoy.

Then just let it fly.  Stew in your own gases for a few hours.

Make sure you open all the windows first.

I'm glad you said open the windows... with all that methane floating around it could have been quite a fire hazard!