Author Topic: The Happiness Equation by Neil Pasricha  (Read 6604 times)

lifejoy

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The Happiness Equation by Neil Pasricha
« on: March 18, 2016, 10:03:10 PM »
I'm enjoying a lot about this book, but it's blowing my mind how anti-retirement it is!

Has anyone else read it??

lifejoy

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Re: The Happiness Equation by Neil Pasricha
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2016, 10:06:45 PM »

PKFFW

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Re: The Happiness Equation by Neil Pasricha
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2016, 02:17:27 PM »
Haven't read the book but it sounds to me like the author is mistaking retirement from the need to work to earn money with retirement from life altogether.

I'm constantly amazed at the number of people who claim they would still continue to go to work and do the same job they've been doing even after winning millions in the lotto because "I'd be bored if I didn't have to work".

Cassie

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Re: The Happiness Equation by Neil Pasricha
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2016, 06:10:43 PM »
People have to find a balance that works for them. Most people do not retire to sit home and do nothing. Those that do-do not do well. I am going to generalize but I think that women are better are finding their identity through many areas and not just work. Men can be more one dimensional in some ways. I know this is not true for everyone.

Classical_Liberal

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Re: The Happiness Equation by Neil Pasricha
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2017, 11:25:08 AM »
Resurrection...

I just finished the book this weekend and, of course, had to pop on the forum and see if there were any posts.  I also enjoyed it, but don't necessarily think it is anti-retirement.  At least not the kind of retirement we talk about on here. I would guess the author just simply hasn't been exposed to the type of "retirement" most MMM folks are planning to take up.  As a matter of fact, most of us are FIREing to take some time for "space" after particularly grueling runs of "burn".  Then, we plan to find, pursue, or modify our "ikigai".

Our job culture in the west is less inclined to allow one to pursue their "ikigai" or change it once we've chosen a specialization.  As a result, the MMM form of retirement is actually doing what the author suggests. I truly feel the best way to to engage in a life purpose is to make money a non-factor (or small factor) in decisions.  Plus most of the science around the popular concept of "find a job you're passionate about" has shown that concept to be a bunch of shit (ie bad advice) for career satisfaction. One is better of finding something they can stick with for at least a couple years. Some links for anyone interested:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6MBaFL7sCb8
https://financialmentor.com/podcast/follow-your-passion/11640
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MKlx1DLa9EA

I think the remainder of the authors thoughts would be rather uncontroversial here.  I liked his simple concept maps, particularly the life-balance.  Also enjoyed his YMOYL way of calculating actual earnings and the lottery concept.  Those types of things always hit me, helps to realize how lucky I am with my place in life, and helps me be less frustrated with work... At least for awhile. 

The idea of happiness first is probably of particular value to forum members as a concept (not the suggestions as they are pretty well known for anyone who has researched happiness science).  I fear many of us (well, me anyway) too often fall into the trap of seeing FI as some magic bullet to create long-term, unrelenting satisfaction. Which, of course it is not. The book helped me refocus my thoughts on taking the required actions to enhance my happiness now.  Only time will tell if my actions follow my thoughts.

It's worth the time to pick up from the library as it's a quick read, particularly if feeling "down" with life.


eljefe-speaks

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Re: The Happiness Equation by Neil Pasricha
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2019, 11:41:25 AM »
Bump because this guy just appeared on NPR. He said part of the appeal of working until death is that you do not need to save for retirement. It has already been said in the thread here, but his entire argument hinges on finding fulfilling work. C'mon, man, what percentage of people out there are going to find work that satisfies their souls until their dying days?

https://amp.wbur.org/hereandnow/2019/08/06/neil-pasricha-retirement-happiness-equation-work

dcheesi

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Re: The Happiness Equation by Neil Pasricha
« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2019, 01:02:51 PM »
Bump because this guy just appeared on NPR. He said part of the appeal of working until death is that you do not need to save for retirement. It has already been said in the thread here, but his entire argument hinges on finding fulfilling work. C'mon, man, what percentage of people out there are going to find work that satisfies their souls until their dying days?

https://amp.wbur.org/hereandnow/2019/08/06/neil-pasricha-retirement-happiness-equation-work
Wow, that's just a dumb statement; you can't just assume that you'll be able to do the same work until the day you die. What happens if you become disabled, and can no longer pursue your "ikigai" as a profession? Or what if you simply age out of it (as discussed in another recent thread/post: https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/mustachianism-around-the-web/retirement-and-cognitive-decline/msg2432311/#msg2432311 )?

Not to mention the fact that many of us need some degree of FI in order to "shift and change [my work] as my values and ideals change". Maybe he feels comfortable leaping from one industry or job description to another without a safety net, but a lot people don't, or they have responsibilities (family etc.) which preclude that.

A Fella from Stella

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Re: The Happiness Equation by Neil Pasricha
« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2019, 05:56:50 AM »
Bump because this guy just appeared on NPR. He said part of the appeal of working until death is that you do not need to save for retirement. It has already been said in the thread here, but his entire argument hinges on finding fulfilling work. C'mon, man, what percentage of people out there are going to find work that satisfies their souls until their dying days?

https://amp.wbur.org/hereandnow/2019/08/06/neil-pasricha-retirement-happiness-equation-work
Wow, that's just a dumb statement; you can't just assume that you'll be able to do the same work until the day you die. What happens if you become disabled, and can no longer pursue your "ikigai" as a profession? Or what if you simply age out of it (as discussed in another recent thread/post: https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/mustachianism-around-the-web/retirement-and-cognitive-decline/msg2432311/#msg2432311 )?

Not to mention the fact that many of us need some degree of FI in order to "shift and change [my work] as my values and ideals change". Maybe he feels comfortable leaping from one industry or job description to another without a safety net, but a lot people don't, or they have responsibilities (family etc.) which preclude that.

This works perfectly if you don't give a crap about leaving something more to your loved ones. Also, what you just need the dough? I have a Roth IRA that gets a little money every month. In my ideal situation, it goes untouched and gets passed on.

TVRodriguez

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Re: The Happiness Equation by Neil Pasricha
« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2019, 07:24:18 AM »
I know a number of attorneys and physicians in their 70s and 80s who could retire and choose to keep working.  They enjoy their work, they are good at it, they make money (not always a lot, but enough for them), and they say, "what else would I do?"  Most of them are working less than full-time, but many of them still work 4-5 days a week.  I've asked a few of them if they plan to retire, and they have told me, flat out, no.  Another "younger" attorney and I have marveled at this and told each other, "if I tell you I still want to be working when we're 60, slap me."  But these people really identify with their profession and find meaning in their work.  They also travel, read, have children and hobbies and other interests, but their work is what gets them up and going in the morning.  They are happy.

Dagnab1t

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Re: The Happiness Equation by Neil Pasricha
« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2020, 11:53:05 AM »
I believe it was Seth Goden on Neil Pasricha’s podcast that said “there is no such thing as work life balance. There is only life.”

I would love to have a job I did not want to retire from. The way it is now I can not wait to retire.
I look forward to reading The Happiness Equation.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2020, 11:55:28 AM by Dagnab1t »