Poll

Have I read Dune?

I have read Dune.
41 (61.2%)
I have read the entire Dune series (Dune through Chapterhouse:Dune).
12 (17.9%)
I am an illiterate monster.
14 (20.9%)

Total Members Voted: 67

Author Topic: Dune: A litmus test  (Read 980 times)

MilesTeg

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Dune: A litmus test
« on: May 21, 2020, 12:49:46 PM »
See poll.

;)
« Last Edit: May 21, 2020, 01:05:58 PM by MilesTeg »

SunnyDays

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2020, 08:40:11 PM »
Not only have I read the entire original series, but also most of the prequels written by Herbert's son.  They are actually more enjoyable than the originals!  Whoever the publisher is, though, had bad judgment in book sizing - the more recent paperbacks have such a small margin on the spine side that it's impossible to properly open the book.  They're actually narrower than usual.  Those are the ones I haven't read yet.

AccidentialMustache

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2020, 11:06:25 PM »
You forgot "I read Dune and was advised by friends I trust to stop at the end of the first book."

beltim

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2020, 01:54:40 AM »
You forgot "I read Dune and was advised by friends I trust to stop at the end of the first book."

Ha! This is hilarious.  I did not get such a warning, and so I kept reading.  Dune is the only series I know of where each sequel is worse than the one before it.  I don't remember how many I read, but it was too many.

Cezil

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2020, 07:22:49 AM »
I love Dune!  Every single time I read it, I understand it in new ways and it's amazing to me.  One of my favorite books.  I did read the subsequent books and struggled to complete the final 3.  Years ago, I started reading through the prequels written by his son, but I am too empathetic and I had to stop reading because I was getting so sad.  I like to sit and think about things, and I'd read the books, and sit and think about them, and it would be not great for my mental health.  I'd love to try again someday; have considered it as a goal for the next year since I've got some more time on my hands, and I would probably see things a bit differently.

GuitarStv

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2020, 07:36:27 AM »
I've read the entire series . . . and have to agree - the first book was far and away the best and they got progressively worse.

dcheesi

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2020, 07:46:09 AM »
You forgot "I read Dune and was advised by friends I trust to stop at the end of the first book."

Ha! This is hilarious.  I did not get such a warning, and so I kept reading.  Dune is the only series I know of where each sequel is worse than the one before it.  I don't remember how many I read, but it was too many.
This, so much this.

Slight tangent; how do folks feel about the various Dune adaptations? I have a perhaps unique perspective on the Lynch film, as I saw it long before reading the book(s). As a result, I actually like the movie, though I certainly recognize it as a totally separate creature from the books. I do find it interesting that Lynch, Mr. Unconventional, fell into a very conventional trope regarding the Messianic protagonist:
Spoiler: show
ending the film at the triumphant climax. Which is strange, when the whole point of the books seems to be exploring what happens after that, and how it all goes wrong...
« Last Edit: May 22, 2020, 07:48:09 AM by dcheesi »

MilesTeg

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2020, 12:00:48 PM »
Not only have I read the entire original series, but also most of the prequels written by Herbert's son.  They are actually more enjoyable than the originals!  Whoever the publisher is, though, had bad judgment in book sizing - the more recent paperbacks have such a small margin on the spine side that it's impossible to properly open the book.  They're actually narrower than usual.  Those are the ones I haven't read yet.

There are no other books.

spartana

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2020, 12:08:17 PM »
Read em all. Seen the movies. I am nerd hear me roar...er...wimper softly.

ETA I realise I only clicked on Read Dune and not the whole series but can't change my answer. But I agree the first book was the best and could have skipped the rest. The movie Dune was OK.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 12:13:39 PM by spartana »

chaskavitch

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2020, 12:14:23 PM »
I'm really interested to see how the movie turns out.  I...don't love Timothee Chalamet, so I guess we'll see how that turns out, but I'm still hopeful.  Possibly for no good reason, but still hopeful.

Every time I read the series I feel obligated to finish all of them through Chapterhouse, and they definitely are so so so weird.  I still love them.

GuitarStv

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #10 on: May 23, 2020, 02:01:53 PM »
I remember re-reading Dune a few years back and being struck by how much stuff Herbert lifted from Arabic culture.  The weird part was reading something that does that but doesn't make at least tangential terrorist references.  In pop culture these references pretty much seem required these days.  :P

SunnyDays

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #11 on: May 23, 2020, 09:09:08 PM »
Not only have I read the entire original series, but also most of the prequels written by Herbert's son.  They are actually more enjoyable than the originals!  Whoever the publisher is, though, had bad judgment in book sizing - the more recent paperbacks have such a small margin on the spine side that it's impossible to properly open the book.  They're actually narrower than usual.  Those are the ones I haven't read yet.

There are no other books.

I donít understand what you mean by this.

GuitarStv

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #12 on: May 23, 2020, 09:10:00 PM »
Not only have I read the entire original series, but also most of the prequels written by Herbert's son.  They are actually more enjoyable than the originals!  Whoever the publisher is, though, had bad judgment in book sizing - the more recent paperbacks have such a small margin on the spine side that it's impossible to properly open the book.  They're actually narrower than usual.  Those are the ones I haven't read yet.

There are no other books.

I donít understand what you mean by this.

It's like how they didn't make any Matrix movies.  Just one, and done . . . rather than create lots of shitty sequels that simply detract from the original.  :P

chaskavitch

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2020, 10:04:03 AM »
Not only have I read the entire original series, but also most of the prequels written by Herbert's son.  They are actually more enjoyable than the originals!  Whoever the publisher is, though, had bad judgment in book sizing - the more recent paperbacks have such a small margin on the spine side that it's impossible to properly open the book.  They're actually narrower than usual.  Those are the ones I haven't read yet.

There are no other books.

I donít understand what you mean by this.

It's like how they didn't make any Matrix movies.  Just one, and done . . . rather than create lots of shitty sequels that simply detract from the original.  :P

Or how there are only three Star Wars movies.

MilesTeg

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #14 on: May 24, 2020, 01:48:28 PM »
Not only have I read the entire original series, but also most of the prequels written by Herbert's son.  They are actually more enjoyable than the originals!  Whoever the publisher is, though, had bad judgment in book sizing - the more recent paperbacks have such a small margin on the spine side that it's impossible to properly open the book.  They're actually narrower than usual.  Those are the ones I haven't read yet.

There are no other books.

I donít understand what you mean by this.


I heard Brian Herbert teamed up with Kevin J. Anderson to write some unrelated books but that the publisher got confused because of the name "Herbert" and though it was a Dune related project.

markbike528CBX

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2020, 06:58:01 PM »
PTF:
I've heard that subsequent books lack the quality of the first.

Is the decline linear or exponential?

Thanks for the reminder/warning.

SunnyDays

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #16 on: May 24, 2020, 07:47:29 PM »
I donít know - I read the Frank Herbert ones as a teen, so maybe I wasnít as discriminating then, but I enjoyed them all.  I liked Brian Herbers books even more because there was more action and character development.  Or maybe I just have lower standards than all you highbrows!

dcheesi

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #17 on: May 25, 2020, 05:12:13 AM »
Not only have I read the entire original series, but also most of the prequels written by Herbert's son.  They are actually more enjoyable than the originals!  Whoever the publisher is, though, had bad judgment in book sizing - the more recent paperbacks have such a small margin on the spine side that it's impossible to properly open the book.  They're actually narrower than usual.  Those are the ones I haven't read yet.

There are no other books.

I donít understand what you mean by this.

It's like how they didn't make any Matrix movies.  Just one, and done . . . rather than create lots of shitty sequels that simply detract from the original.  :P

Or how there are only three Star Wars movies.
Or, perhaps the ultimate example:

Highlander movies --there can be only one!

Wolfpack Mustachian

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #18 on: May 26, 2020, 10:49:40 AM »
You guys have saved me a lot of trouble. I've read the first one and now won't read any others. Thanks!

MilesTeg

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #19 on: May 28, 2020, 12:38:26 PM »
You guys have saved me a lot of trouble. I've read the first one and now won't read any others. Thanks!

The Dune series covers a timespan of about 5,000 years and doesn't suffer the flaw of trying to maintain the same cast of characters throughout that or attempt to maintain any status quo. It tells a story with a greatly evolving cast and setting (like the real world) even though its core plot and central themes persist. I think that's one of the main things that causes people consternation.

The only book I found to be difficult was God Emperor of Dune, which is most people's stumbling block.

Sadly the series ends on a cliffhanger that foreshadows major and interesting changes. RIP Frank Herbert.

Wolfpack Mustachian

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #20 on: May 28, 2020, 12:50:12 PM »
You guys have saved me a lot of trouble. I've read the first one and now won't read any others. Thanks!

The Dune series covers a timespan of about 5,000 years and doesn't suffer the flaw of trying to maintain the same cast of characters throughout that or attempt to maintain any status quo. It tells a story with a greatly evolving cast and setting (like the real world) even though its core plot and central themes persist. I think that's one of the main things that causes people consternation.

The only book I found to be difficult was God Emperor of Dune, which is most people's stumbling block.

Sadly the series ends on a cliffhanger that foreshadows major and interesting changes. RIP Frank Herbert.

Do you mean the series with his writing or his son's writing that ends in the cliffhanger?

MilesTeg

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #21 on: May 28, 2020, 06:02:07 PM »
You guys have saved me a lot of trouble. I've read the first one and now won't read any others. Thanks!

The Dune series covers a timespan of about 5,000 years and doesn't suffer the flaw of trying to maintain the same cast of characters throughout that or attempt to maintain any status quo. It tells a story with a greatly evolving cast and setting (like the real world) even though its core plot and central themes persist. I think that's one of the main things that causes people consternation.

The only book I found to be difficult was God Emperor of Dune, which is most people's stumbling block.

Sadly the series ends on a cliffhanger that foreshadows major and interesting changes. RIP Frank Herbert.

Do you mean the series with his writing or his son's writing that ends in the cliffhanger?

Frank Herbert's original works, which are sadly incomplete because of Frank's death.

mspym

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #22 on: May 28, 2020, 11:13:03 PM »
I've read the Frank Herbert Dune series multiple times, the one I've read least often is the second one but I wonder if I was just too young to be that interested in the pitfalls of winning and empire. I tried the Brian Herbert books and, well, couldn't make it through the first one. It felt like the a Wikipedia synopsis of a Dune novel.

And of course as I get older, some of the more egregious male author nonsense starts standing out more (really? Alia practising sword fighting naked? Yeah right) but even Chapterhouse Dune stood up in terms of concept - if the future is foreseen, how can we escape the trap.

Sailor Sam

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #23 on: Today at 04:53:37 AM »
Iíve never read Dune (Iím sorry!), but I coincidentally just abandoned completing Frank Herbertís White Plague. So goddamn slow, and the misogyny was too blatant to endure.

draco44

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Re: Dune: A litmus test
« Reply #24 on: Today at 08:15:22 AM »
I've read and enjoyed the main trilogy, seen the movies, and am looking forward to the new film.

I don't want to prioritize reading all the other Dune books out there, but for those who have, how was Dune: The Butlerian Jihad, specifically? It would be interesting to learn more about the "no thinking machines!" background of the Dune universe. I've read the wikipedia article for the highlights.