Author Topic: Cord Blood Banking  (Read 1705 times)

Epor

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Cord Blood Banking
« on: April 18, 2018, 10:28:34 AM »
Hello;

Over a decade ago, when I was pregnant with my first child I tried to be super responsible. No alcohol, no coffee, no salmon/tuna, regular doc visits, vitamins everyday... AND when baby was born I arranged to have his cord blood collected and stored.

I do not have a medical/research background, but I recall briefly asking my OB, who handled me a list of companies they worked with - but nothing more. I did not even knew what the cord cell blood was supposed to cure/treat: to this day I am still unsure.

I still pay a yearly storage fee of about 100$. I mostly do not even think about it.

My question to fellow MMM's is: is cord blood banking just a way to get money from new parents? I tried to search online about it, but most articles/publications seems to be from people that are trying to sell it. Are there public health guidelines about it?

MrUpwardlyMobile

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2018, 10:31:15 AM »
Hello;

Over a decade ago, when I was pregnant with my first child I tried to be super responsible. No alcohol, no coffee, no salmon/tuna, regular doc visits, vitamins everyday... AND when baby was born I arranged to have his cord blood collected and stored.

I do not have a medical/research background, but I recall briefly asking my OB, who handled me a list of companies they worked with - but nothing more. I did not even knew what the cord cell blood was supposed to cure/treat: to this day I am still unsure.

I still pay a yearly storage fee of about 100$. I mostly do not even think about it.

My question to fellow MMM's is: is cord blood banking just a way to get money from new parents? I tried to search online about it, but most articles/publications seems to be from people that are trying to sell it. Are there public health guidelines about it?

I know a number of doctors that are recent mothers.  None of them were interested.  As to why that is, I have no idea. 

I'm a red panda

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2018, 10:33:02 AM »
I personally think it is a way to get money from scared parents.  It would be extraordinarily rare that you ever need your cord blood.  Certainly the people who have banked it and do need it will provide amazing anecdotes to how it saved their child's life; but that isn't to say something else wouldn't have if it was not available.

We donated our cord blood to a public bank.  Hopefully, if we ever need it, that public bank will be able to provide us access to cord blood (likely not OURS, but in general).  In the much more likely case someone else needs it, I am glad it is there for them.

Keep in mind also, if the condition you need cord blood to "save" your child is genetic; there is a large chance the cord blood can't be used because the blood is effected.

honeybbq

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2018, 11:32:32 AM »
Yes is the answer to your question.

I donated my child's. If everyone donated, those companies would be out of business and the children who need them would get them.

Epor

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2018, 12:54:18 PM »

Well, I'm not really surprised by the answers so far. I feel a dumb for having falling for it, probably should researched more at the time. I should probably cancel it at this point: Both kids are healthy so far (ages 11 and 8).

Sibley

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2018, 01:07:38 PM »
I'd do a bit of research to see if the saved blood could be donated and used by someone one. But yes, cancel.

Chippewa

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Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2018, 01:19:46 PM »
Cord blood (in relation to a transplant for cancer) has a rich source of stem cells that doesn’t need to be blood typed to the recipient, there is less chance for developing gvhd after transplant and it can be used in a allogeneic transplant. Even with those perks, the source amount available from a cord is limited. So a transplant would under go a double cord transplant (one cord which not of your child’s)

In question of banking my own child’s cord in the event my child or myself May develop cancer, I would not. In question of releasing my child’s cord to be used by someone like the Nat’l Cancer Institute to help a transplant recipient, yes.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2018, 01:21:25 PM by Chippewa »

I'm a red panda

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2018, 01:21:29 PM »

Well, I'm not really surprised by the answers so far. I feel a dumb for having falling for it, probably should researched more at the time. I should probably cancel it at this point: Both kids are healthy so far (ages 11 and 8).

If you aren't just going to cancel, you might want to look up the age where it isn't useful to you anymore.  The volume is so small, cord blood generally can't be used for adults.  I'm not sure where that age changes.

dcozad999

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2018, 01:26:08 PM »
Yes is the answer to your question.

I donated my child's. If everyone donated, those companies would be out of business and the children who need them would get them.


We would have gladly donated if we knew anything about it. You'd think someone would have mentioned it.

I'm a red panda

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2018, 01:31:28 PM »
Yes is the answer to your question.

I donated my child's. If everyone donated, those companies would be out of business and the children who need them would get them.


We would have gladly donated if we knew anything about it. You'd think someone would have mentioned it.

I think not all hospitals are set up to handle it.

brycedoula

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2018, 02:00:56 PM »
Yes is the answer to your question.

I donated my child's. If everyone donated, those companies would be out of business and the children who need them would get them.


We would have gladly donated if we knew anything about it. You'd think someone would have mentioned it.

I think not all hospitals are set up to handle it.

That is correct. In Canada you can donate your cord blood through Canadian Blood Services but ONLY in certain provinces.

Also, if you plan on having a "physiological 3rd stage" of birth, meaning that after your baby is born you don't cut the cord right away & wait until it stops pulsing & deflates, there isn't enough blood left to remove anyway.

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #11 on: April 18, 2018, 02:22:30 PM »

Also, if you plan on having a "physiological 3rd stage" of birth, meaning that after your baby is born you don't cut the cord right away & wait until it stops pulsing & deflates, there isn't enough blood left to remove anyway.

That's a good point. I think this is typically what is recommended now anyway.  When I asked about needing it in our birth plan I was told it is the standard at our hospital.

(I did not end up having what we called delayed cord clamping (physiological 3rd stage is a new term for me), because she was removed in an emergency, and there was no time for tha)

Epor

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #12 on: April 18, 2018, 03:02:40 PM »

Also, if you plan on having a "physiological 3rd stage" of birth, meaning that after your baby is born you don't cut the cord right away & wait until it stops pulsing & deflates, there isn't enough blood left to remove anyway.

That's a good point. I think this is typically what is recommended now anyway.  When I asked about needing it in our birth plan I was told it is the standard at our hospital.

(I did not end up having what we called delayed cord clamping (physiological 3rd stage is a new term for me), because she was removed in an emergency, and there was no time for tha)

Hopefully everything went well?

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2018, 06:52:45 AM »

Also, if you plan on having a "physiological 3rd stage" of birth, meaning that after your baby is born you don't cut the cord right away & wait until it stops pulsing & deflates, there isn't enough blood left to remove anyway.

That's a good point. I think this is typically what is recommended now anyway.  When I asked about needing it in our birth plan I was told it is the standard at our hospital.

(I did not end up having what we called delayed cord clamping (physiological 3rd stage is a new term for me), because she was removed in an emergency, and there was no time for tha)

Hopefully everything went well?

Yes; her oxygen levels were continuing dropping during labor, so I spent most of my labor on my hands and knees in an oxygen mask.  My midwife called for a c-section "before this becomes an emergency" and called the OB.  I was transferred to the OR on my hands and knees, but once I had on the operating table, her O2 plummeted, so they had to give me general anesthesia and get her out as quickly as possible.  But she is perfectly healthy and so am I.  She spent an hour or two (I don't know exactly as I was coming out of anesthesia) in transition, but no NICU time.  I missed that "golden hour" of skin to skin; and I think establishing breastfeeding was harder because of the c-section and anesthesia; but in the end all was well.  it turns out I was having a partial placental abruption.

Epor

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #14 on: April 20, 2018, 10:09:05 AM »

Also, if you plan on having a "physiological 3rd stage" of birth, meaning that after your baby is born you don't cut the cord right away & wait until it stops pulsing & deflates, there isn't enough blood left to remove anyway.

That's a good point. I think this is typically what is recommended now anyway.  When I asked about needing it in our birth plan I was told it is the standard at our hospital.

(I did not end up having what we called delayed cord clamping (physiological 3rd stage is a new term for me), because she was removed in an emergency, and there was no time for tha)

Hopefully everything went well?

Yes; her oxygen levels were continuing dropping during labor, so I spent most of my labor on my hands and knees in an oxygen mask.  My midwife called for a c-section "before this becomes an emergency" and called the OB.  I was transferred to the OR on my hands and knees, but once I had on the operating table, her O2 plummeted, so they had to give me general anesthesia and get her out as quickly as possible.  But she is perfectly healthy and so am I.  She spent an hour or two (I don't know exactly as I was coming out of anesthesia) in transition, but no NICU time.  I missed that "golden hour" of skin to skin; and I think establishing breastfeeding was harder because of the c-section and anesthesia; but in the end all was well.  it turns out I was having a partial placental abruption.

Thanks for sharing; The whole ordeal sounded terrifying, I'm happy everything worked well for both of you. 

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #15 on: April 20, 2018, 10:11:45 AM »

Also, if you plan on having a "physiological 3rd stage" of birth, meaning that after your baby is born you don't cut the cord right away & wait until it stops pulsing & deflates, there isn't enough blood left to remove anyway.

That's a good point. I think this is typically what is recommended now anyway.  When I asked about needing it in our birth plan I was told it is the standard at our hospital.

(I did not end up having what we called delayed cord clamping (physiological 3rd stage is a new term for me), because she was removed in an emergency, and there was no time for tha)

Hopefully everything went well?

Yes; her oxygen levels were continuing dropping during labor, so I spent most of my labor on my hands and knees in an oxygen mask.  My midwife called for a c-section "before this becomes an emergency" and called the OB.  I was transferred to the OR on my hands and knees, but once I had on the operating table, her O2 plummeted, so they had to give me general anesthesia and get her out as quickly as possible.  But she is perfectly healthy and so am I.  She spent an hour or two (I don't know exactly as I was coming out of anesthesia) in transition, but no NICU time.  I missed that "golden hour" of skin to skin; and I think establishing breastfeeding was harder because of the c-section and anesthesia; but in the end all was well.  it turns out I was having a partial placental abruption.

Thanks for sharing; The whole ordeal sounded terrifying, I'm happy everything worked well for both of you.

I think it was scarier for my husband than me.  Him because he was scrubbed up and ready to come into the OR, and then they wouldn't let him.  I wasn't nearly as aware of what was going on. 
« Last Edit: May 09, 2018, 08:47:35 AM by iowajes »

CindyBS

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #16 on: April 20, 2018, 10:54:15 AM »
My son got a bone marrow transplant for cancer last year from an unrelated donor.

One of the big perks of having a banked cord is if your child needs a transplant and the sibling is a match and has a banked cord.  Cords are safer to transplant than just marrow.   To me that is the reason to do it.  That being said my kids are not matches to each other and if we had banked either one of their cords we would not have been able to use them.

I do know people who have had their child get a transplant from their siblings cords.  It is one of those things, when you child's life is on the line, you will be happy you did it, but the chances of needing it are super low.  Transplants in kids are still very rare and even most childhood cancer is not treated by transplant.

Most kids get cancer under age 5, so you probably know if you need it by then.  However, my son didn't get cancer until age 13 and the rates of teenage/young adult cancer are on the rise. 

sgonsalv

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #17 on: May 09, 2018, 08:45:46 AM »
My wife delivered our first kid last year and we looked into cord blood banking as well during her pregnancy.  Her obgyn sent us a presentation from another doctor in a conference she had attended regarding his research in this very topic.  He found that an alarmingly high percentage (90%) of banked cord blood gets damaged during retrieval and storage, AND THIS IS NOT REPORTED TO CLIENTS BY THE PRIVATE BANKS.  So in essence you're paying a large amount of money to bank cord blood that has a less than 10% chance of being undamaged enough to be used as a possible treatment for a set of rare diseases, and can only be used to treat a sibling.  Given this information, we chose not to use a private cord blood bank.

Please note that we are not opposed to using a public cord blood bank, which is free and can benefit anyone (I think of it as an organ donation while the donor is still alive).  We just didn't get a chance to look into it in time before the kid got here, but it's something we'll keep in mind for baby #2.  Hope this helps.

nickybecky1

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #18 on: May 11, 2018, 04:20:09 PM »
I'm 36 weeks pregnant right now and our midwives just had this discussion with us. We have three options at our hospital - private banking (no delayed cord clamping), public banking for research (long delay of clamping is okay), or public banking for others to use (in the middle). They said the only reason to do private banking would be if you're already aware of a family history of the kinds of diseases that are treatable with cord blood. And I think for some reason even then it's only helpful for the sibling, not even the child themselves. We can just let them know when we check in. I suspect we'll donate to the research option so we don't have to cut short the time before clamping?

milliemchi

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #19 on: May 26, 2018, 08:51:52 PM »
This is the third thread I've seen on cord blood banking, and I'm beginning to wonder if I am missing something. Generally, the consensus is that there is no point in doing it, and I am left scratching my head. I won't retype my earlier arguments for doing it, because I'm sure that can be searched, but in short: a) medicine creates miracles daily, and you should not judge potential uses 18 years down the road by today's; b) as a way of an example, ten years ago they have already shown that stem cells can heal the heart muscle after a heart attack - something a good chunk of us may experience; and c) as a way of another example, the work on 3D-printing artificial organs and populating them with person's own stem cells is just taking off. Of course, by the time that work is done, stem cells will likely be derived from adult tissues, but that is also a work in progress.

Just as a comment, some of the private banks will refund all your payments in case that your child's blood is needed but unusable. Still a good business plan for them, as most will never be used, but it's nice to know.

cchrissyy

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Re: Cord Blood Banking
« Reply #20 on: May 26, 2018, 08:56:32 PM »
the companies that sell it are just soaking up money from nervous parents

Donating it to research is good! I did that with one birth. It was just chance that the hospital was set up to do that and offering it to anybody interested at that time and not when my other kids were born.