Poll

What tool are you using to track your investment returns?

Excel, Google Sheet, Spreadsheets
34 (55.7%)
Mint
4 (6.6%)
Personal Capital
13 (21.3%)
None
1 (1.6%)
Other (please specify)
9 (14.8%)

Total Members Voted: 52

Author Topic: What tool are you using to track your investment returns?  (Read 1583 times)

titlewealth

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 2
What tool are you using to track your investment returns?
« on: January 15, 2020, 07:44:50 AM »
Hey everyone, I am wondering what you all use to track your investment portfolio returns? I am currently using Excel and Personal Capital but looking to see what else is out there. Thanks!

RWTL

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 202
Re: What tool are you using to track your investment returns?
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2020, 07:51:34 AM »
StockMarketEye

titlewealth

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 2
Re: What tool are you using to track your investment returns?
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2020, 07:54:45 AM »
StockMarketEye

Thanks! Never heard of them but checking it out. I don't think they will track alternative investments like real estate and litigation finance, etc. but I may be wrong.

RWTL

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 202
Re: What tool are you using to track your investment returns?
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2020, 07:58:31 AM »
You're correct - only stocks/mutual funds.

techwiz

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1172
  • Location: Ontario
Re: What tool are you using to track your investment returns?
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2020, 08:09:59 AM »
Monthly I use the online broker software (currently 3 different ones ) to export my investment numbers and consolidate into Excel where I check the progress and asset allocation. Yearly I update a big FI Excel with all my expenses and investments.     

beltim

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2884
Re: What tool are you using to track your investment returns?
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2020, 08:36:33 AM »
Quicken.  Sadly, since Quicken 2007 for Mac is no longer supported, and the newest version doesn't have the same levels on investment reporting, I'm in the market for a new tool.  See https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/ask-a-mustachian/tracking-spending-what-software-do-you-use-in-2020/

BriarRose111

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 251
  • Location: Midwest
Re: What tool are you using to track your investment returns?
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2020, 08:43:19 AM »
Just check on online broker sites where each acct is held.

Brother Esau

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 645
Re: What tool are you using to track your investment returns?
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2020, 08:48:54 AM »
Quicken

DadJokes

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1332
Re: What tool are you using to track your investment returns?
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2020, 09:12:58 AM »
I tried Personal Capital, but I got tired of having to log back into all the accounts all the time. So I went back to just checking the individual websites and updating a Google Sheet manually. It's only 5 websites to check monthly, which takes all of 10 minutes.

vand

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 683
  • Location: UK
Re: What tool are you using to track your investment returns?
« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2020, 04:36:13 AM »
I use Excel to track my overall net worth and portfolio breakdown, but that is completely different to tracking investment returns which is more complex and requires you to keep track of cashflows and net assets from one time period  to the next.


https://www.shorturl.at/shortener.php

"Assume your portfolio’s value was $1,000 at the beginning of the month, and $1900 at the end of the month. On the 10th day of the month, you deposit $250, and on the 20th day of the month you deposit another $250. The overall value of your portfolio (after the deposits are made) on the 10th day is $1,300, and $1,700 on the 20th day. Therefore, there are three “sub-periods”- the first includes days 1-10, the second days 11-20, and finally the third is for days 21-30.

In order to calculate the time weighted return, we first need to calculate the return of each sub period.

The return of sub period one is: [($1,300-$250)-$1,000] / $1,000 = 5%.
The return of sub period two is: [ ($1,700-$250)-$1,300 ] / $1,300 = 11.5%
The return of sub period three is: [ ($1,900-$1,700) ] / $1,700 = 11.8%

Finally, we compound the returns together to calculate the overall time-weighted rate of return:

Time-weighted rate of return: [(1+0.05)*(1+0.115)*(1+0.118)]^0.33 -1 = 9.39%"
« Last Edit: January 16, 2020, 05:32:43 AM by vand »

vand

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 683
  • Location: UK
Re: What tool are you using to track your investment returns?
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2020, 05:47:03 AM »
Here is another good article on the crucial differences between various measures of "investment returns":

https://www.kitces.com/blog/twr-dwr-irr-calculations-performance-reporting-software-methodology-gips-compliance/

"Consider the following scenario that we will use to highlight the different computation methods, using the fictitious ABC company.

On January 1st, you purchase 10,000 shares of ABC at $10 per share
Total investment of $100,000
Portfolio value is $100,000 (10,000 @ $10)
ABC grows to $20 per share by Jan 31
Portfolio value is $200,000 (10,000 @ $20)
You have made $100,000 in January
On February 1st, you purchase 10,000 shares at $20 per share
Cash flow of $200,000, total investment of $300,000
Portfolio value is $400,000 (20,000 @ $20)
On February 28th, ABC shares drop to $14
Portfolio value is $280,000 (20,000 @$14)
You have lost $120,000 in February.
You have lost $20,000 lifetime.

In this example, we purposely put the flows at the beginning of the month, so the monthly calculations would be a bit easier. In this scenario:

January: All 3 methods will yield the same thing.  We started with $100,000, we ended with $200,000, and since there were no intervening cash flows we are up $100,000 on an investment of $100,000 and it’s all pure investment return, so we have a rate of return of 100%.

February: Since we put the flow at the beginning, all three methods will show the same result for the month of February.  We started with $400,000 (since the contribution happened precisely at the beginning of the month), and ended with $280,000, which means we lost $120,000 and have a rate of return of -30%.

Year to Date: The monthly returns are easy to follow, but now let’s look at YTD:

Basic Rate of Return: The investor cumulatively invested $300,000 (which is $100,000 initially plus $200,000 in the second month), and lost $20,000 (which is $280,000 final value, minus $100,000 starting value, and $200,000 of cash flows), so the basic rate of return is -6.67%.

Time-Weighted Return: January was up 100%, while February was down 30%, which when time-linked gives us a rate of return of +40%.

IRR (Dollar-Weighted Return): The IRR calculation for this scenario is rate of return of -10.22%, which reflects the unfortunate fact that while the gain was 100% in January and the loss was “just” 30% in February, the loss receives a much higher weighting because the investor added dollars to the portfolio just before the loss and had far more invested (therefore, a higher dollar weighting) on the way down. (Notably, this IRR calculation is not the same as would be calculated in Excel, as the Excel IRR calculation assumes equal time periods and is annualized, whereas this example includes time periods with a slightly different number of days, and was only for 2 months and not a full year.)

ABC Company: Also worth noting is what the underlying company holding itself did. The ABC company started the year at 10 as now at 14, which means it is up 40% for the year.  NOT coincidentally, this is the same return shown by the TWR (which is meant to represent the returns of the underlying portfolio, regardless of the investor’s cash flows in or out).

This scenario highlights some of the differences in the methods of computing performance. The IRR shows a larger loss than the basic rate of return.  This is because the IRR accounts for the fact that the additional $200,000 contribution in February was participated in the market decline in February but not the gain in January (thus increasing the weighting of the February loss), whereas the basic does not make that distinction that part of the cash was only invested for the loss but not the gain. The IRR of -10.22% is a better indicator of the true performance than the basic, which is -6.67%."

Stimpy

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 182
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Middle of Nowhere
Re: What tool are you using to track your investment returns?
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2020, 09:59:14 AM »
I use mint, and honestly it sucks for investment tracking. but is awesome for spending tracking.  I'd sign up for PC, but would rather minimize 3rd parties accessing all my accounts.  (PC per my understanding, sucks at spending tracking but excels at investment tracking.)

So, I also keep track on a personal database, which I have been meaning to, but have not had time to create an interface for.   It is a little more manual but I have anything I want, except current price, at my finger tips.

YoungInvestor

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 408
Re: What tool are you using to track your investment returns?
« Reply #12 on: January 16, 2020, 06:08:21 PM »
Somehow, my online broker is the best mix of convenience and quality.

I tried others, but it's perfect.

It doesn't include my DCPP (Canadian equivalent of 401k), but that's alright, I don't control the investments there anyway.

Father Dougal

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 52
Re: What tool are you using to track your investment returns?
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2020, 01:27:32 AM »
C'mon, surely all investing nerds like us have an Excel spreadsheet squirrelled away somewhere?

I don't want to tell you something you know already, but one thing I stumbled across recently and find very useful is the Stocks data facility in Excel. I think it's reasonably new and is in standard Excel 365 or whatever it's called now. Real time prices (well, 20 minutes delayed or something) at the click of a refresh button.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2020, 01:38:55 AM by Father Dougal »

beltim

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2884
Re: What tool are you using to track your investment returns?
« Reply #14 on: January 19, 2020, 03:03:50 AM »
So I just tried to import my data from Quicken 2007 into Banktivity 7.  It was a total disaster.  The banking accounts look okay, but I don't think any of the investment accounts worked at all.  There's a Lending Club account that should have a value of or close to 0.  Banktivity reports it as $425k.  One account that is worth about $8k shows up as $2.9 million.  I understand exports from Quicken can be tricky, but there's something fundamentally wrong if none of the investment accounts work – at all.  Also, the reporting appears terrible.  I could be missing options somewhere, but I don't see how to make custom investment reports (using only specified dates or securities).

I'll look into Moneydance next, or maybe SEE Finance.

reeshau

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 774
  • Location: Dublin, Ireland
Re: What tool are you using to track your investment returns?
« Reply #15 on: January 19, 2020, 04:29:57 AM »
Another nod for Quicken.

habaneroNorway

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 510
Re: What tool are you using to track your investment returns?
« Reply #16 on: January 19, 2020, 05:14:19 AM »
My online bank where I have my brokerage account shows how much I own of various funds and the total return as an amount and a percentage of current balance. If I'm really curious it also holds every single purchase and the return on that single purchase to date. In addition all my equity investments (index funds + some single-name stocks) are held in a special tax-advantaged account so I can pretty much just look at the total amount in that account less the amount I have put in. That's more than enough for me and I don't really need to accurately calculate my annualized returns, which, as pointed out is bit complex when money flows in (or out) at various times.

My job-sponsored retirement plan is held separate, but I can check how much has been put in and how much it's worth now.

My social security plan does not have any market-based returns anyway. That's just an amount contributed every year and how much I get will be dependent on how much is put in and when I start withdrawing from it (62 earliest age). The beauty of this pillar of my assets is that the payout I will receive is indexed to the wage growth so it can be expected to return slightly above inflation, which is a fine feature of something that is essentially cash.

And finally I have another type of retirement plan due to a change in the system a few years back. This will pay me a fixed amount from age 67 until I die. Unfortunately this is not wage- og inflation indexed but it has a guaranteed return which is around the inflation rate and it's tax-sheltered as well. So pretty close to an inflation-linked bond unless inflation skyrockets (bad) or drops low for a long time.

I consolidate all into an Excel sheet at month-end to keep track of NW over time. It's a good feeling when increase in NW every month is higher than take-home pay that month, but can't really expect this kind of market performance as a normal so I'll enjoy it while it lasts.