Poll

What percentage of your monthly pre tax income do you invest in the stock market?  Include 401k contributions, comapny stock, Roth, etc

0 - 9%
8 (3.2%)
10 - 19%
29 (11.7%)
20 - 29%
38 (15.4%)
30 - 39%
46 (18.6%)
40 - 49%
46 (18.6%)
50 - 74%
64 (25.9%)
75-99%
13 (5.3%)
>100%
1 (0.4%)
I dont invest in stocks
2 (0.8%)

Total Members Voted: 241

Author Topic: What percentage of your monthly income do you invest in the stock market?  (Read 8183 times)

Goldy

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This question came up in a conversation with some friends so I figured I would ask the MMM community.  I included the household 401k (with company match), roth, HSA, company stock, taxable investments, and came up with 54%.

SwordGuy

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Ditto for us, 54%.

Would have been 57% but our rental properties increased our income. :)

Seppia

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I invest 100% of my monthly savings in the stock market since I already have my cash cushion and plan on having no real estate, except for the day I decide where to settle (maybe).
So that would be approximately 55% of my salary (varies depending on the month since I pay my rent every trimester)

I'm a red panda

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Sorry double post

I'm a red panda

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about 40%

Though I didn't add company 403b contributions. They put in 13%, but I didn't feel like doing the math on how that increases my salary so what percent it then becomes.

capitalninja

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An average of 63% last year. My plan is to increase that the 67 - 70% range this year.

I max my 401k, HSA, SEP IRA and put the remaining investing related dollars into after tax investment accounts.

force majeure

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I invest > 100% of my monthly salary. Yes, really.
I have the stash built, income funds. Still working age 47, but living on the passive income, adding surplus from that to my salary each month, putting it into 1 of 5 funds, permanent portfolio / dividend hybrid strategy.

ender

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Right now 20% of my income to my 401k.

We're not sure on IRAs for this year, given that we are saving cash for a house and are likely not going to be in tIRA deductibility ranges.

Tjat

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Monthly is volatile as certain months have bulk investments (two separate 5500 deposits, bulk 529 contribution, etc.), but for 2016, I project to come in right around 50%

NotJen

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Mine varies monthly (I stick what's leftover in my checking account each payday in my taxable account).  But last year's average was 42%.  This is the pre-tax amount. It would be 55% post-tax.

Retire-Canada

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With some downshifting related income reduction I'm at ~40% each month in savings invested in stock markets. I'm looking forward to some additional income coming in later this year and hopefully bumping that 40% well above 50%.

soccerluvof4

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0 i am fire'd

dreams_and_discoveries

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Most of my savings - ~65% of income. Rest goes on Peer to Peer.

ransom132

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Glad I am not the only one in the 20-29%, I thought I would of been the lowest in the bunch. Doing my best to free up some cash to invest more.

Reido

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I invest > 100% of my monthly salary. Yes, really.
I have the stash built, income funds. Still working age 47, but living on the passive income, adding surplus from that to my salary each month, putting it into 1 of 5 funds, permanent portfolio / dividend hybrid strategy.

Dividebd hybrid strategy?  Any interest in explaining?  Sounds interesting...

onlykelsey

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~56%, but this just started this year and I'm not sure I can maintain the pace.  So probably more like 45 or 50% of my monthly take home.  Bonus will go 95% to debt or investing, but i'm not sure of its size.

ScarElbow

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40-50%. Would be more if I stopped eating out so much. But delicious Asian dishes are the 9th wonder of the world.

mxlemore

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I answered 10-19% because I've currently got 16% going to my 401k at work and I'm not exactly sure how much I contribute to my taxable accounts outside of that number, so I erred on the side of caution and went low.

Guess I better figure out my average monthly contributions. That'll be cool to know and it'll give me a chance to tweak some spreadsheets. :)

Apocalyptica602

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We're pretty high income (~200k) so maxing our 401ks, HSAs, and IRAs is around that 50-55k mark (I didn't add in the company match). So that's 20-29% for us =(.

That being said we haven't been adding to taxable investments because we've been doing ~$5,400 a month toward our house downpayment, once we close on our home the mortgage will be much lower than $5,400 per month, and I'll split the residual leftover between prepayments on the mortgage (3.9%, not mathematically ideal but makes my wife sleep better) and taxable investments (my preference).

It's all about compromise, so that'll bump us up in the % of investment in the stock market.

Jon_Snow

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100% of our dividends are reinvested, and half of DW's monthly haul (I'm FIRE'd). Works out to around 70% of our total income invested every month. Numbers will change significantly when DW hangs it up...but still very good. :)

MrsDinero

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30% in 401k contributions (various Spartan funds). I'm considering bumping this to 50% to make sure I max out my 401k before maternity leave

Routing extra money into my "maternity savings" bucket, so I don't have to dip into my EF when I'm on maternity leave.  Not sure what percentage this is yet. 

Jack

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40-50%. Would be more if I stopped eating out so much.

Ditto.

It's actually been much higher in the last few months, because I started a new, higher-paying job last year and was catching up for FY 2015 (in fact, from October to December it was 100%, shoveling my entire paycheck straight into my 401K to max it before Dec 31). I plan to finish up my 2015 IRA contributions when I get paid this Friday, and then after that my leftover money (after FY 2016 401K, IRA and HSA contributions) will be going towards debt.

jaizan

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Averaged 65% over the last 7 years.

steveo

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We save about 70% of our income.

rageth

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I'm right at 18.5%, but I'm also trying to kill some student and auto loans.  Can't wait to destroy those over the next 2 years and really kick my investing into high gear!

Heckler

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63% of net dual income.  Not too shabby for a couple with a townhouse, three cars, 10 bicycles and 2 dirtbikes (all paid off).
« Last Edit: March 09, 2016, 09:15:09 PM by Heckler »

zephyr911

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Pretty sure you meant any IRA as opposed to just Roths...?

dude

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Net of bond investments, @24% will go to the market this year.

trail_Runner

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We're pretty high income (~200k) so maxing our 401ks, HSAs, and IRAs is around that 50-55k mark (I didn't add in the company match). So that's 20-29% for us =(.

That being said we haven't been adding to taxable investments because we've been doing ~$5,400 a month toward our house downpayment, once we close on our home the mortgage will be much lower than $5,400 per month, and I'll split the residual leftover between prepayments on the mortgage (3.9%, not mathematically ideal but makes my wife sleep better) and taxable investments (my preference).

It's all about compromise, so that'll bump us up in the % of investment in the stock market.

Mind if I ask how you manage to do IRA's with that high of an income? Are you able to still avoid paying taxes or do you just have to bite the bullet and pay on them? Also, congrats on the really impressive income!

Apocalyptica602

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We're pretty high income (~200k) so maxing our 401ks, HSAs, and IRAs is around that 50-55k mark (I didn't add in the company match). So that's 20-29% for us =(.

That being said we haven't been adding to taxable investments because we've been doing ~$5,400 a month toward our house downpayment, once we close on our home the mortgage will be much lower than $5,400 per month, and I'll split the residual leftover between prepayments on the mortgage (3.9%, not mathematically ideal but makes my wife sleep better) and taxable investments (my preference).

It's all about compromise, so that'll bump us up in the % of investment in the stock market.

Mind if I ask how you manage to do IRA's with that high of an income? Are you able to still avoid paying taxes or do you just have to bite the bullet and pay on them? Also, congrats on the really impressive income!

Ah thanks! Sorry I mispoke, I meant Roth IRAs. MFJ income limits there are 183,000-193,000 for the contribution phase out, so with our AGI we're under that. Yeah our MAGI is too far above the $118,000 phase out limit for traditional IRA deductions.

mrpercentage

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Im in the 20's so far this year. Might back off a little. I have stuff I need to do like a bunch of random stuff in the house, hanging  on a CA beach, and insuring I have enough cash that I never need to sell stocks in a pinch. I think it's more important to not have to sell than it is how much you put in. 

Currently I have $1500 standing by for my next favorite that takes a massive hit. Since I'm playing individuals I am sure it will come soon.

Richie

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Currently at about 28%.  Giving myself five years to get to 75%.  Ambitious, but I'm making progress.

MickeyMoustache

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Hmm only about 25-30% but that is only from maxing 2 401ks, IRAs, and some taxable.  I wonder if people included all investments in their numbers (since you were asking only for the stock portion of portfolios). 

Tabaxus

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Around 50%, I believe.  ~$290k of pay, ~50-60k of expenses (this estimate might be too high, so my savings rate may be higher, but it doesn't include $10k of funeral expenses that I had to pay and will be reimbursed for eventually), ~$80k of federal and state income and payroll taxes.

Vilgan

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Since the poll states pretax income, makes it really hard to hit that 75-99% category since taxes will eat a large chunk of gross before you even have a chance to invest it.

onlykelsey

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Vilgan- yeah.  i read the title of the post, though, and went by that.  Of pre-tax income, my answer for 2016 is probably something like 25%, which is much lower than my post-tax (I live in NYC with a high-paying job).

Tabaxus

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Vilgan- yeah.  i read the title of the post, though, and went by that.  Of pre-tax income, my answer for 2016 is probably something like 25%, which is much lower than my post-tax (I live in NYC with a high-paying job).

New York City folks have it tough.  My state income tax is just a titch higher than the NY city tax, setting aside new york state tax...