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Learning, Sharing, and Teaching => Investor Alley => Topic started by: Valvore on February 27, 2020, 04:02:44 PM

Title: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Valvore on February 27, 2020, 04:02:44 PM
This is my first true correction (I thought Dec 2018 was pretty minor). It's also the most my accounts have ever fluctuated in such a short time. Help me laugh it off by posting yours correction "losses"


7 day "loss" -6.45% ($12,000) from a high on 2/20
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: BECABECA on February 27, 2020, 04:26:34 PM
Iíve lost $134,782 since 2/20, although itíll be more when todayís losses get reflected in my brokerage account. The good news is that by the time you get this much in index funds to result in that big of a drop in a few days, youíre pretty used to the bumpiness of the ride.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Gone Fishing on February 27, 2020, 04:28:31 PM
Two Teslas...
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: leighb on February 27, 2020, 04:31:47 PM
I'm down about 5% if I just look at stocks/bonds. 2% if I look at everything.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: brooklynmoney on February 27, 2020, 04:31:58 PM
My annual salary
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: londonbanker on February 27, 2020, 04:41:38 PM
Down roughly $150k - on paper.
Nice opportunity for the market to take a breath - hopefully another 10% comes off so that we can grow back on a sound base (and I can invest my remaining liquidity)
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: geekette on February 27, 2020, 04:52:11 PM
About 4 years of spending money.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Alternatepriorities on February 27, 2020, 05:01:20 PM
Last year my investments returned more money than I earned. So far this year they've lost more than I'll spend... Fortunately I earn more than I spend.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Brother Esau on February 27, 2020, 05:05:21 PM
Down $90k, a mere blip on the radar
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Freedomin5 on February 27, 2020, 05:07:39 PM
We are down about half a yearís living expenses.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Fire and forget on February 27, 2020, 05:11:56 PM
Half of my apartment.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: EliteZags on February 27, 2020, 05:12:40 PM
zero, cause I haven't sold anything


but yea ok down about a Mercedes
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Nangirl17 on February 27, 2020, 05:25:59 PM
zero, cause I haven't sold anything


but yea ok down about a Mercedes

Love it!

We're roughly down almost a year's expenses.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: hadabeardonce on February 27, 2020, 05:27:55 PM
Haven't lost any shares and we're still accumulating more at lower prices. The value of those shares is down nearly ($40,000) though.

My accounts are 90:10 and my wife's are 80:20 stock:bond allocation. I'm keeping an eye on rebalancing, but not deviating from our planned allocation or contributions - I did make a larger Roth ira contribution two days ago that settled yesterday though.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: American GenX on February 27, 2020, 05:35:19 PM
80 GRAND - and that's with a very conservative AA!
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: aboatguy on February 27, 2020, 05:50:31 PM
not as bad as I believe they will be this time next week or even tomorrow when our TSP losses  post.  (Good news is my retirement posted last night so after paying the bills I was able to throw another grand into the market .  I believe waiting would probably get me a better price but that would be market timing .   We invest our cash when its available and who knows it may be up tomorrow.


But to answer your question down about 30k today and probably another 20k from the TSP tomorrow
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: mjr on February 27, 2020, 06:10:53 PM
$250,000
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: ixtap on February 27, 2020, 06:12:32 PM
About half of this year's savings goal.

Or, if RSU's are going to suck this year, I guess ~3/4's of this year's savings goal.

All bets are off if there are layoffs.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: atribecalledquest on February 27, 2020, 06:48:25 PM
Too much to look.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: ownmytime on February 27, 2020, 06:49:56 PM
Down 55,000.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: trygeek on February 27, 2020, 07:44:12 PM
A couple years of Tuition at the college of your choice.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: celerystalks on February 27, 2020, 07:52:03 PM
Lost a comma.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Joe Schmo on February 27, 2020, 07:57:42 PM
I didnít know we were supposed to calculate...
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: ChpBstrd on February 27, 2020, 08:24:21 PM
Actually, not as much as I would have thought. Even double checked my financial aggregator.  -4.65%. I'm back to where I was in mid-December, which is not tragic at all.

I put our 401k's in mostly conservative allocations, have much of my brokerage account exposure hedged, and sold about $16k worth of VGT and $30k of QQQ two weeks ago. But I had not yet sold some puts that were hedging my QQQ so I had a tiny amount of reverse gearing on the dip :))))). I had also sold a put on TLT two weeks ago and enjoyed a small but rapid gain.

The bond tent works.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: marty998 on February 28, 2020, 12:53:04 AM
Nothing.

I sold up the equities portfolio on 30 January and bought a property.

Accidental market timing for the win. Yeah baby ;)

(Had I held, I'd be down $36,000 or so)
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: stylesjl on February 28, 2020, 02:48:42 AM
Zero since I didn't sell. But this week I went from $4000 above my purchasing price to -$2300. Still not selling, in fact I might even start shovelling a bit more in. Overall had $60,000 in the market.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: coynemoney on February 28, 2020, 06:40:50 AM
I'm down about $14K this month. This is my first noticeable loss and I have a weird mixture of being bummed about my recent contributions just disappearing and glee at the fact my portfolio is large enough to see real affects from the market.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Dicey on February 28, 2020, 07:03:39 AM
Not even gonna look. Luckily, because we were busy doing other things, we hadn't funded our 2019 Roths yet. We'll be doing that, plus filling the 2020 Roths in the next couple of days. That's a drop in the bucket, but a nice consolation. We are very cash heavy right now, so we are looking at dumping some of it into the market
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: YoungGranny on February 28, 2020, 07:10:37 AM
Net worth is down about $82k from where I was a week or so ago on paper. Technically haven't lost anything since I'm not selling anytime soon.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: AM43 on February 28, 2020, 07:15:33 AM
Did not look and not going to look, but I am pretty sure losses(on paper) are in six figures.
Sticking to my plan and contributing more to my accounts on weekly and monthly basis just like I did back in 2008.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: frugalnacho on February 28, 2020, 07:33:17 AM
Not sure.  I update my networth on the 1st of every month, so I didn't even realize I had a bunch of gains between Feb 1 and 20 - so those gains won't be missed since I didn't even know what they were.  With everyone freaking out, and all the crazy headlines about the market dropping 10%+ in only a few days I logged in last night to check my balance, but I'm only down roughly 3.5% (~$23k) from 2/1 so meh. 
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: JAYSLOL on February 28, 2020, 07:34:42 AM
A very nice used car.  ~$6100 as of last night, looks like Iíll add another couple $k to that by the end of today. 
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: charis on February 28, 2020, 08:07:52 AM
$27K, on paper, in the last week.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: GuitarStv on February 28, 2020, 08:43:54 AM
0$


You don't lose anything unless you sell.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Beridian on February 28, 2020, 08:44:21 AM
I am down $80,000 from my account high last month.  Ouch.   
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: renata ricotta on February 28, 2020, 08:46:50 AM
Around $60k or so. My mint app has a little alert saying ďyour net worth is now $X. Seem off to you? Make sure all of your accounts are syncing.Ē
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: therethere on February 28, 2020, 09:13:23 AM
Yesterday I was down 70k from 2/1. I know it's all monopoly money that I made in the runup from Dec-Jan. But still. It's about double that if you went from the high on 2/20.

Add in today's losses? I'm now down ~98k from 2/1 maybe even more. I'll find out tomorrow at my monthly NW check-in. I thought I could handle a correction but 6 days in a row is too much. I think I'm going to have to stop watching now. I've dumped 10k into VTSAX during this dropoff and it just keeps losing more and more. Also, real cool that our annual 401k match was deposited on Monday and I've been frontloading our 401k's..... Last years huge gains gave me false hopes of quitting and take a year off this year. Guess not now.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: MichaelB on February 28, 2020, 09:22:57 AM
Over the past week I'm down $15k as of market close yesterday. Probably will be closer to $18k assuming today's losses hold.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: American GenX on February 28, 2020, 09:26:07 AM
I've lost 4 to 5 years of bare bones retirement expenses in equity since the closing high on Feb 19th.

It's a loss in my equity - doesn't matter whether I've sold anything.

I fully expect the market to drop further from here.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: SubL stache on February 28, 2020, 09:43:06 AM
I'm down about $45,000.  Pushed me back under 500k Net Worth when I thought I had cleared that hurdle for good.

I do have about $195,000 in cash...I got lucky and a 401k rollover processed the day before this drop, so 25k was credited to my IRA this morning in the settlement fund and now it can buy VTSAX at ~14% cheaper.  I moved 5k over, probably will move another 5k next week until its gone.

The other $170,000 has been sitting in Ally at 1.6% waiting to be deployed as a downpayment to replace the home we sold 6 months ago...but now I'm starting to think about whether I should rent longer and move this money into equities if the discount becomes large enough...
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: dougules on February 28, 2020, 09:58:23 AM
Is anybody else proud of the fact they don't know and haven't looked?
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: GuitarStv on February 28, 2020, 10:01:50 AM
Is anybody else proud of the fact they don't know and haven't looked?

*hi-5*
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: MustacheAndaHalf on February 28, 2020, 10:12:09 AM
Given another day of -3% so far, some people might have updates.

Overall this week losses have been about -15% for the entire US market (and maybe -10% for international?).
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: v8rx7guy on February 28, 2020, 10:15:29 AM
$15K in paper losses so far.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Alternatepriorities on February 28, 2020, 10:21:16 AM
Is anybody else proud of the fact they don't know and haven't looked?

*hi-5*

I havenít actually checked the numbers, but my brain is such that I ďthe market is down x%Ē and immediately estimate X% * Stash and the think ďoh wow thatís probably more than we will spend this yearĒ. DW is considerably better at not noticing at all. If it doesnít change our strategy (it hasnít) she doesnít care at all. I might wake her to discuss more aggressive (than 50%) savings/investing if the market keeps this up for another couple weeks.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: ctuser1 on February 28, 2020, 10:21:32 AM
This thread made me look - just for shi*tz and giggles. I have accounts spread over 3 brokerages, 9 separate logins - to gather everything!!

I have $130k in paper losses so far.

Of course the first thing I did after doing that calculation was to txt that to my wife "hey, you lost half a house in two days" - since I know this freaks her out :-D

My daughter's UTMA account has $50 losses so far. If it persists till the next statement is printed, then it will be the first time she will see a loss in her statement since I had her invest in VT/VOO in Jan 2019. I'm hoping this will be an educational opportunity.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: KathrinS on February 28, 2020, 10:22:26 AM
Is anybody else proud of the fact they don't know and haven't looked?

*hi-5*

I last looked two days ago, but by now it'll probably have declined a lot more. I won't look, but am excited to buy more funds tomorrow.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: frugalnacho on February 28, 2020, 10:26:14 AM
This thread made me look - just for shi*tz and giggles. I have accounts spread over 3 brokerages, 9 separate logins - to gather everything!!

I have $130k in paper losses so far.

Of course the first thing I did after doing that calculation was to txt that to my wife "hey, you lost half a house in two days" - since I know this freaks her out :-D

My daughter's UTMA account has $50 losses so far. If it persists till the next statement is printed, then it will be the first time she will see a loss in her statement since I had her invest in VT/VOO in Jan 2019. I'm hoping this will be an educational opportunity.

I said almost the same thing expecting to get a rise out of my wife and she just responded "so? Markets go up and down, and we knew that going in.  We're in it for the long haul, so stop looking at the balances because it doesn't matter"

Which is exactly what I've been trying to drill into her head since we started this journey like 6 years ago.  She has internalized it more than I thought she would, so both of us are completely zen about it.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: GGNoob on February 28, 2020, 10:28:40 AM
About $40,000. I'm back to where I was in January.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Parentheses on February 28, 2020, 10:30:42 AM
I havenít calculated. Iím trying hard to see this as a great buying opportunity as I still have a lot of cash on hand to unload in investments, just trying to decide when to pull the trigger.

Unfortunately my husband and I both put significant amounts into vanguard funds and fully funded both IRAs just a week before this happened. Very unfortunate timing.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Alternatepriorities on February 28, 2020, 10:39:33 AM
Given another day of -3% so far, some people might have updates.

Overall this week losses have been about -15% for the entire US market (and maybe -10% for international?).

People like you are why I know roughly what the drop in assets was. I agree with GuitarStv that actual loses are zero since I haven't sold anything though I do wish I'd been a little more disciplined in re-balancing US and International after the US run up last year...

I actually bought large (for us) slices of VTSAX and VTIAX on Wednesday afternoon because the plan was to buy "as soon as I knew which accounts to buy with for optimal taxes"...
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Alternatepriorities on February 28, 2020, 10:41:47 AM
I said almost the same thing expecting to get a rise out of my wife and she just responded "so? Markets go up and down, and we knew that going in.  We're in it for the long haul, so stop looking at the balances because it doesn't matter"

Which is exactly what I've been trying to drill into her head since we started this journey like 6 years ago.  She has internalized it more than I thought she would, so both of us are completely zen about it.

Nice! Well done.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Alternatepriorities on February 28, 2020, 10:43:04 AM
$15K in paper losses so far.

Will that even buy the portion of the car that is in your profile photo? :)
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Valvore on February 28, 2020, 10:49:32 AM
As OP I guess I'll state the obvious.... Of course there haven't been any realized losses because none of us have sold. That is why "losses" is in quotes. Is that ok snarky internet friends? lol
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Valvore on February 28, 2020, 10:50:50 AM
Lost a comma.

That's got to sting a little :( It'll be back up there sooner or later!
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Valvore on February 28, 2020, 10:54:37 AM
Yesterday I was down 70k from 2/1. I know it's all monopoly money that I made in the runup from Dec-Jan. But still. It's about double that if you went from the high on 2/20.

Add in today's losses? I'm now down ~98k from 2/1 maybe even more. I'll find out tomorrow at my monthly NW check-in. I thought I could handle a correction but 6 days in a row is too much. I think I'm going to have to stop watching now. I've dumped 10k into VTSAX during this dropoff and it just keeps losing more and more. Also, real cool that our annual 401k match was deposited on Monday and I've been frontloading our 401k's..... Last years huge gains gave me false hopes of quitting and take a year off this year. Guess not now.

Twins! I've also been front loading in anticipation of taking a sabbatical this year. We had a goal number to hit before we quit and take off. We were so close, and now we are much farther away. Le Sigh.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Garrett B. on February 28, 2020, 11:03:17 AM
I'm down around 7% this week.  Bonds are all that prevented it from being worse. 
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: vand on February 28, 2020, 11:36:34 AM
My annual salary

Thatís when you know sh1t is real.

Havenít checked my funds in the past week as Iím on hols and it takes a good amount of effort to log into all the various accounts I hold, but I would estimate Iím easily down >10% despite holding what I consider a defensively positioned portfolio.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Ricochet on February 28, 2020, 11:39:50 AM
0$


You don't lose anything unless you sell.
I'm with you... this was a "going all in" opportunity for some cash reserves I had. No plans to sell any time soon.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: ctuser1 on February 28, 2020, 11:41:50 AM
I have a large position in AAPL. It started today at $258, and is back up to $270 right now.

More importantly for me, a different stock that I'm very interested in is behaving nicely. I have a reasonable amount of RSU vesting in it based on today's closing price. I want it to remain as low as possible because I pay income tax on the entire vesting amount - not capital gains.

I first saw AAPL creeping upwards, and started panicking! But the other one is staying nice and low! That's my boy!!

Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: American GenX on February 28, 2020, 11:46:51 AM
As OP I guess I'll state the obvious.... Of course there haven't been any realized losses because none of us have sold. That is why "losses" is in quotes. Is that ok snarky internet friends? lol

It's still a loss of equity.  When people talk about their stash and net worth, they don't put a qualifier on there that they have invested in equities and may have unrealized gains/losses.  They include the current equity value, and they include it whether it's been "realized" or not.

Money is fungible.  It's still a loss.  No use downplaying it.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: marcus_aurelius on February 28, 2020, 11:49:26 AM
About $180K paper losses so far (from overall stock portfolio of ~1.8M), but no worries. Won't sell anything or change 401K contributions. Will buy ~$75K if market drops another 5%.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Omy on February 28, 2020, 12:00:53 PM
Probably a lot but I haven't even looked. Trying to figure out when I'll be brave enough to put a bunch more into the market.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: vand on February 28, 2020, 12:17:31 PM
0$


You don't lose anything unless you sell.

I guess you havenít gained anything either unless you sell :-d
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Car Jack on February 28, 2020, 12:39:21 PM
A hundred fifty grand before today (Friday).  I doubt I'll even get down half a mil before things turn around.  snooze.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: ChpBstrd on February 28, 2020, 12:42:31 PM
Not sure what is meant by all this talk about a buying opportunity. Was the market a bargain 5 months ago at the same prices? If so, should I presume you went all in at that time? If thatís the case, how much money could you possibly have now that you could deploy into stocks?

Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: YttriumNitrate on February 28, 2020, 12:47:52 PM
Down about a year's gross pay, and taking advantage of it is much as possible:

**Invested three months gross pay this morning
**Refi-ing house to 30 year fixed at 3.25%
**If we get another 15% drop, I'll be using the dip to simplify my taxable portfolio
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: the_fixer on February 28, 2020, 12:47:55 PM
Maybe I am a masochist but it is actually comforting seeing big swings when you have a pretty large chunk in the market.

It makes the math a reality when you see a swing and realize that it is a year or two of spending or as much as you earn in a year suddenly the concept of your little green soldiers (compound interest) working is real.

Still over a year out from FIRE sitting at 80/20 stocks / bonds and our account values have dropped by about 2 years worth of expenses guessing 3 by the end of today.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: GuitarStv on February 28, 2020, 01:16:19 PM
0$


You don't lose anything unless you sell.

I guess you havenít gained anything either unless you sell :-d

Yep.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: cool7hand on February 28, 2020, 01:34:15 PM
I'm curious why most people are using an amount of money to define their losses. Am I missing something or doesn't that prevent an apples to apples comparison?

We're down less than 3.5%. We use Ray Dalio's All Weather Portfolio.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: frugalnacho on February 28, 2020, 02:06:08 PM
I'm curious why most people are using an amount of money to define their losses. Am I missing something or doesn't that prevent an apples to apples comparison?

We're down less than 3.5%. We use Ray Dalio's All Weather Portfolio.

Because no one cares if your $1,500 portfolio is down 10%, 20%, or even 50%.  It's peanuts because your entire portfolio is peanuts.  If your $2M portfolio is down 20% however, that translates to a real dollar value that can be staggering. 

I checked my portfolio and posted in this thread, but I only get a snapshot of it on the first of the month, so I lost all gains between Feb 1 and the top, and then some.  My dollar value is probably closer to $50k in "losses" that I'm down. 
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Garrett B. on February 28, 2020, 02:12:10 PM
It appears there are some signs the crash may be nearing its end.  The Nasdaq ended the day in the green, albeit a very, very small gain of 0.01%. 
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Cabaka on February 28, 2020, 02:18:54 PM
zero, cause I haven't sold anything


but yea ok down about a Mercedes


no one that did not sell did not lose number of shares in this or that account but you still lost time. you think it's going to gain all that back in 6 days or 6 months given the economic affects alone from the virus are still growing and will take a long time to recover. it's probably a year minimum before you are back. anyone that follows a simple moving average kept more capital and now has more to reallocate when the trend reverses, but you all keep dollar cost averaging away.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Laura Ingalls on February 28, 2020, 02:33:58 PM
I'm curious why most people are using an amount of money to define their losses. Am I missing something or doesn't that prevent an apples to apples comparison?

We're down less than 3.5%. We use Ray Dalio's All Weather Portfolio.

I will phrase mine not as $ or % but as three years expenses.  Not enjoying it but not stressed either.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Jonboyz on February 28, 2020, 03:08:46 PM
$114,0000 dip, not a loss unless I were foolish enough to divest my investments right now.

Itís a good exercise in self-discipline and learning to not get caught up in mass hysteria.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: mudstache on February 28, 2020, 03:22:55 PM
-$44,700 before today's drop.  It'll be a few hours before my accounts reflect the slip today.  Bummer to have to wait for it to recover, but at least I can buy at a discount next week when my bonus gets paid!
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: I'm Fred on February 28, 2020, 05:24:37 PM
Down about $420,000.  Can I get a cookie?
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: American GenX on February 28, 2020, 05:30:26 PM

Well, it ended better than when I checked earlier in the day.  Since the Feb 19th closing high in the S&P 500, I'm down a little less than 4 years of bare bones expenses and about 2 years of expenses when including discretionary spending.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: elaine amj on February 28, 2020, 05:35:51 PM
Thanks for making me check today lol.  Compared to Monday when I last checked, I am down $38k. I cringed a bit but am pressing on.

Sent from my VCE-AL00 using Tapatalk
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Stachless on February 28, 2020, 05:43:22 PM
Down about 18 months of living expenses as of close of market today. 

Though I could easily shrink that figure just by spending a whole lot more!

Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: use2betrix on February 28, 2020, 07:14:57 PM
My personal capital is all over the place at the moment so itís hard to calculate my official losses. I have a bit over 2 years living expenses in cash saved, so now Iím in the process of slowly dumping about half that into the market. $15k hit my vanguard VTSAX today. I transferred another $30k from my checking to my vanguard money market in preparation of my next investment, and I transferred $40k from my high yield savings to my checking also in preparation of more investing.

Once all that is settled I ďthinkĒ Iíll be down around $50k or so from my peak.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Full Beard on February 28, 2020, 08:43:34 PM
I'm down about a high end Toyota Corolla. 
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: OtherJen on February 28, 2020, 09:18:39 PM
Paper loss of just under $9000 as of market close this evening (I reconcile Quicken on Fridays). *shrugs* Since we're nowhere close to FIRE, I'm not particularly concerned.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: mies on February 29, 2020, 04:02:36 AM
Month to month, it doesn't look too bad. I'm only down about $10,000 compared to the end of January. I'm down about $20,000 from the all time high we had last week.

I'm prepared for it to get worse. It sucks to see your net worth take a beating like that, but the flip side is stocks are on sale right now.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: xander on February 29, 2020, 04:25:02 AM
So I was on the sidelines a week or so ago. Then I put roughly 88% of my net worth back into the market between my brokerage and 401k account. I made a post about it being all proud that I was finally done being a market timer.

Then this happened lol. Are there any admins in here that can change my username to Bob?

Not a big deal though since I didn't sell. Losses are around $17000. It will be a blip in the grand scheme of things.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: celerystalks on February 29, 2020, 04:58:59 AM
Lost a comma.

That's got to sting a little :( It'll be back up there sooner or later!

I didnít feel a thing. Still have the same amount of assets, the price is just different. Actually...I have MORE assets, since I bought MORE through the sell-off.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: MoneyGoatee on March 01, 2020, 11:02:29 AM
This is nothing to long-term investors.  Those who are affected are those who were set to retire on Feb 20th with retirable nest eggs up until that point, but the subsequent 14% drop in the market suddenly lowered their nest eggs to UNretirable amounts.  If they were set to start withdrawing from their nest eggs, then now it is probably NOT the time.  This is when having a 6 months to a year's worth of emergency fund would be useful.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: facepalm on March 01, 2020, 11:53:02 AM
Is anybody else proud of the fact they don't know and haven't looked?
HAHA yes.

The only thing I might do is change my asset allocation at some point to take advantage of the inevitable slow rise.

Personally, I think investors have been spooked for a while, and are using the virus to justify a sell-off.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Malcat on March 01, 2020, 02:05:39 PM
Couldn't tell you.

I'm just super bummed I decided to take this year off to go back to school and don't have thousands and thousands to throw at this beautiful trough.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: lhamo on March 01, 2020, 02:15:09 PM
Down about 110k from our latest peak on 2/19/2020.  But only down around 27k from Jan 1.  And still up roughly 289k from a year ago. 

I did harvest a small amount of gains in October 2019 and Jan 2020 -- I have reasons for holding those funds in cash for now, may deploy them (+ other cash funds) if we have a really bad year.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Fish Sweet on March 01, 2020, 11:18:41 PM
I wasn't going to check, except this thread inspired me to run the numbers.  "Lost" about a year's worth of living expenses, or about 20k.  Can't deny that it pinches a little, but I just so happened to sell off a big chunk back in January for unrelated reasons and was just considering funding my Roth IRA this year so.... yay accidental market timing, I guess.  This is the biggest correction I've encountered since starting to invest seriously, and if I can keep my attitude at a mild "well, guess that kinda sucks" territory, I think I'll be fine.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: appleshampooid on March 02, 2020, 04:05:11 AM
About 70k I think, not paying too close attention.

I'm just pissed because I was so busy on Friday putting in a refinance application that I forgot to hit the exchange button on my TLH order. Had it all ready to go but was waiting until just before close to make sure I got the right lots (MFs so no real time pricing). Realized I missed the boat at 16:04 .

Looking at futures, market will probably rebound today, but I'm hoping/guessing the TLH opportunities won't be gone...
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Bettersafe on March 02, 2020, 06:16:06 AM
Well.... to be honest.... I just started investing in January this year.... so my losses a insignificant to some numbers I've seen here.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Much Fishing to Do on March 02, 2020, 06:35:20 AM
This is my first true correction (I thought Dec 2018 was pretty minor).

I thought the market hit ~20% drop last quarter of 2018? (so not just a correction but almost a bear).... maybe it was 10%, its amazing how far ago these can become in the mind so quickly.  This one is definitely a lot faster.

Looks like from top to bottom so far is about $3.09m to 2.82m, so about 9%.  Wow, that was fast.  The thing that makes this one a lot more noticeable to me than past ones is just the happenstance that I've always considered $3M to be my somewhat arbitrary FatFIRE number (producing $10k/mth @ 4%SWR), so that threshold has some meaning to me, and I watched it solidly cross over over the last 4 months and the solidly cross back last week...the definition of easy come easy go ;-)
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: dougules on March 02, 2020, 10:58:24 AM
As OP I guess I'll state the obvious.... Of course there haven't been any realized losses because none of us have sold. That is why "losses" is in quotes. Is that ok snarky internet friends? lol

It's still a loss of equity.  When people talk about their stash and net worth, they don't put a qualifier on there that they have invested in equities and may have unrealized gains/losses.  They include the current equity value, and they include it whether it's been "realized" or not.

Money is fungible.  It's still a loss.  No use downplaying it.

There is a lot of use in downplaying putting it in perspective.  The biggest threat to your investments is your own psychology.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Alternatepriorities on March 02, 2020, 11:03:12 AM
well crap I can add a bit more to my losses due to the time it took to sell one equity and buy another... I was trying to keep the same assest allocation but move the riskier asset from my regular IRA to my Roth, but forgot it took a day for VTSAX sales to clear on Friday. By the time I woke up (Alaska) I'd missed 3%
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: foghorn on March 02, 2020, 11:24:33 AM
I updated my portfolio over the weekend and the Net Worth "reduction" was about $118,000 - or about 4% of Investment NW (not including Home Value).

But like most others - I did not sell, so no losses.

 

Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: zinnie on March 02, 2020, 12:33:09 PM
~100k! Happy to see things back up a bit today. And happy it didn't bother me in the slightest. I just didn't look...
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: redhead84 on March 02, 2020, 02:33:43 PM
I updated the net worth schedule this morning. We are down around $185K, and this does not factor in our February savings. It was hard to see our net worth drop by a full year of AGI, but it does not change anything with our day to day lives. We are continuing to invest as planned.

Actually, I feel proud that i didn't check the balances every day last week as the markets tumbled. I waited for my normal monthly check in to update the net worth schedule and double check that all of the direct deposits and automatic investments were processed correctly.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Reynold on March 02, 2020, 04:10:55 PM
Paper losses about 2x what I make in a year, or 5x living expenses, I haven't checked exactly.  I put $200k more into index funds Friday, like to buy on sale, looks like I was right not to wait until today (Monday) when the market rebounded 5%. 

I would not be surprised if it drops again, as supply chain disruptions continue, but if so I have some more I can invest. :)
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Villanelle on March 02, 2020, 04:16:27 PM
No idea, and not interested in spending the time it would take to figure it out. 
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Travis on March 03, 2020, 02:09:49 AM
From the 19th when this started and not including today's gains, I "lost" roughly this year's salary.  With today's rebound I "gained" a little over 2 month's salary back.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: FireLane on March 04, 2020, 08:34:26 AM
At the end of February, my portfolio was down $135,000. No sweat. Ten years from now, this will be an insignificant blip.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: YttriumNitrate on March 10, 2020, 07:57:16 AM
Down about a year's gross pay, and taking advantage of it is much as possible:
**Invested three months gross pay this morning
**Refi-ing house to 30 year fixed at 3.25%
**If we get another 15% drop, I'll be using the dip to simplify my taxable portfolio

And there goes another year's gross pay. ;-). It's interesting to see how the fear has grown in the last two weeks. We're definitely not yet at the level of 2008, but we're starting to get close.

2020 is shaping up to be the second great buying opportunity of my working career.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: fattest_foot on March 10, 2020, 08:14:39 AM
I kind of wish that we had calculated how much we had at the top in mid-February. But because I only do accounts at the end of the month, I really have no idea how much we had.

But my guess after yesterday's 7% drop is that we've probably crossed into six figure "losses" now. If we just go from the end of February when I last did our monthly count, we're probably down about 2 years worth of expenses.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: v8rx7guy on March 10, 2020, 08:23:39 AM
Down a decent C6 Vette...
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: ChpBstrd on March 11, 2020, 12:37:25 PM
Down -7% vs the S&P at -19%. My protective puts are bottoming out, but I think we have further to fall so Iím holding my hedges for now. Hopefully this is the fall Iíve spent years preparing for.

KEEP FALLING! At 40% down, Iíll make my AA more aggressive.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: vand on March 11, 2020, 01:14:07 PM
I was pleasantly surprised to find my portfolio had stood up comparatively well when I finally totally it up over the weekend, down something like -7% from its mid-Feb peak. This week will have seen some further damage, however. NAV probably down 11-12% after today's hammering.

Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: BFGirl on March 11, 2020, 01:26:02 PM
75K
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: FireinNY on March 11, 2020, 01:34:11 PM
60K as of yesterday.  Another 5-10K after today's market rout and I fully expect we could be headed for another rough couple of months as the coronavirus situation gets worse.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: facepalm on March 11, 2020, 07:55:07 PM
I think I'm down about 10%. Meh
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: ChpBstrd on March 12, 2020, 12:45:47 PM
Has anyone done worse than the S&P 500? If so, how?
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: GuitarStv on March 12, 2020, 12:48:24 PM
Has anyone done worse than the S&P 500? If so, how?

Invest in Boeing?
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Alternatepriorities on March 12, 2020, 12:58:46 PM
Has anyone done worse than the S&P 500? If so, how?

Invest in Boeing?

Or VDE
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: magnet18 on March 16, 2020, 02:45:20 PM
Down about 2/3rds of a house down payment
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Buffaloski Boris on March 16, 2020, 03:24:35 PM
As of today Im down a fairly nice new car.  Thats the bad news.  The good news is once these prices come down some more, I'll be in a good position to buy.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: vand on March 16, 2020, 03:41:49 PM
My total net worth is down from £265k at mid-Feb peak to £224k after today, but in reality I have thrown in another £8k in to the market during that time, so portfolio performance should be down to about £216k, about -19%.

As the crash has unfolded I have found that my attitude has changed; at first nobody wants to see their net worth fall, but now that it has taken hold I've accepted this is a necessary event and welcome more falls because I just want to get it out of the way.

Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Alternatepriorities on March 16, 2020, 04:01:24 PM
My total net worth is down from £265k at mid-Feb peak to £224k after today, but in reality I have thrown in another £8k in to the market during that time, so portfolio performance should be down to about £216k, about -19%.

As the crash has unfolded I have found that my attitude has changed; at first nobody wants to see their net worth fall, but now that it has taken hold I've accepted this is a necessary event and welcome more falls because I just want to get it out of the way.

This.

Actually, one thing I've gained is the new realization that the stash size is really less important to my life and happiness than I made it out to be at the peak.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: TheAnonOne on March 16, 2020, 04:16:11 PM
I am down almost 200k. I had 660k at the peek, down to 470ish.

So...

NW 840 -> 670
$$ 660 -> 470

I am around 90% VTSAX, the other 10% is a mixture of VTIAX(Int) and a small (10k) amount of tokens.

It doesn't really sting as bad as I thought. Now, if layoff start it will get bad but for now, I am buying something like 4-6k a month just in 401k + IRA contributions. I figure this will benefit me overall as long as I can stay employed!
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: geekette on March 16, 2020, 04:18:24 PM
Bad news:  We're down a nice house (in our MCOL area)
Good news: We still have more than we retired with 7 years ago.  At least for now.  But still - ouch.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: johndoe on March 16, 2020, 06:32:13 PM
My investments are down ~$30k (~20%).  My net worth is down ~10%.  I'm shocked how well the average person on here takes this considering how carefully we squirrel away funds.  Seeing two years' worth of expenses vaporize in a matter of days is very frustrating and I have a hard time believing people are so willing to accept it.  I can wrap my head around "ok NOW the assets are on 'sale'" so continue buying, but if that's the analogy then I was overpaying for the last 3 YEARS.

I will leave 401k contributions untouched but have tinkered with my taxable account.  I know nothing about this stuff, but boy it's hard to stand on the train tracks when you hear the whistle.  I started reading /r/wallstreetbets as a joke, but I'll be damned if they weren't right about this virus!
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: vand on March 16, 2020, 07:22:32 PM
My investments are down ~$30k (~20%).  My net worth is down ~10%.  I'm shocked how well the average person on here takes this considering how carefully we squirrel away funds.  Seeing two years' worth of expenses vaporize in a matter of days is very frustrating and I have a hard time believing people are so willing to accept it.  I can wrap my head around "ok NOW the assets are on 'sale'" so continue buying, but if that's the analogy then I was overpaying for the last 3 YEARS.

Unfortunately.. Yes. The market was asking you to pay $28 per $1 of profit, and you willingly did so. Don't beat yourself up about it, it's a part of the passive strategy and it just means that it will take longer for the buys at those prices to become profitable at a more sensible valuation, but if you stick to the strategy you will also hoover up your share when it is underpriced, so its swings and roundabouts.

As for people here being so sanguine about their losses, I can only speak for myself, but having been around for 2 major market meltdowns in my lifetime you learn that markets always over-react to a crisis, and these should be used as buying opportunities. If you're feeling bad about it then so is everyone else, and that is usually not a bad time to be buying.  I run a more defensive portfolio than many here, because I envision that the bulk of my stash will come from earnings contributed over the next few years when I finally hit my FI number, not from compounded returns, so why take on huge downside risk for only a couple of %age points more expected return.

There is a time to be more aggressive and a time to be more defensive, and now with the markets having had a good haircut and future expected earnings correspondingly raised, now is the time to dial up the risk a bit.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: magnet18 on March 16, 2020, 07:28:28 PM
My investments are down ~$30k (~20%).  My net worth is down ~10%.  I'm shocked how well the average person on here takes this considering how carefully we squirrel away funds.  Seeing two years' worth of expenses vaporize in a matter of days is very frustrating and I have a hard time believing people are so willing to accept it.  I can wrap my head around "ok NOW the assets are on 'sale'" so continue buying, but if that's the analogy then I was overpaying for the last 3 YEARS.

I will leave 401k contributions untouched but have tinkered with my taxable account.  I know nothing about this stuff, but boy it's hard to stand on the train tracks when you hear the whistle.  I started reading /r/wallstreetbets as a joke, but I'll be damned if they weren't right about this virus!

I think about it like a time machine

This is a rare, rare opportunity to go back and invest 3 years ago, when I was personally not able to / frugal enough to invest at the level I am now

How often does life give you a time machine and let you go have a do-over?

I'm personally quite excited.

The NW hit I've already taken will be back before I'm ready to retire, and I have an unbelievable opportunity to shovel in more into this time machine and send back to 2017 or earlier depending on how this goes, and let it invest on fast forward


I'm aware this is a bit inaccurate because of dividend reinvesting, but you get the idea
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: fattest_foot on March 16, 2020, 08:00:27 PM
Down about 2/3rds of a house down payment

Estimating here, but we're down about 70% of our entire mortgage. 170k vs 240k mortgage.

And speaking of ^ time machine, I've thought similarly. Except now we have salaries much higher than 3 years ago.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Alternatepriorities on March 16, 2020, 10:37:16 PM
My investments are down ~$30k (~20%).  My net worth is down ~10%.  I'm shocked how well the average person on here takes this considering how carefully we squirrel away funds.  Seeing two years' worth of expenses vaporize in a matter of days is very frustrating and I have a hard time believing people are so willing to accept it.  I can wrap my head around "ok NOW the assets are on 'sale'" so continue buying, but if that's the analogy then I was overpaying for the last 3 YEARS.

Unfortunately.. Yes. The market was asking you to pay $28 per $1 of profit, and you willingly did so. Don't beat yourself up about it, it's a part of the passive strategy and it just means that it will take longer for the buys at those prices to become profitable at a more sensible valuation, but if you stick to the strategy you will also hoover up your share when it is underpriced, so its swings and roundabouts.

As for people here being so sanguine about their losses, I can only speak for myself, but having been around for 2 major market meltdowns in my lifetime you learn that markets always over-react to a crisis, and these should be used as buying opportunities. If you're feeling bad about it then so is everyone else, and that is usually not a bad time to be buying.  I run a more defensive portfolio than many here, because I envision that the bulk of my stash will come from earnings contributed over the next few years when I finally hit my FI number, not from compounded returns, so why take on huge downside risk for only a couple of %age points more expected return.

There is a time to be more aggressive and a time to be more defensive, and now with the markets having had a good haircut and future expected earnings correspondingly raised, now is the time to dial up the risk a bit.

Thanks for the longer explanation on your thinking Vand. That helps some of the things youíve said elsewhere make more sense to me. 
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Travis on March 17, 2020, 03:55:48 AM
From the 19th when this started and not including today's gains, I "lost" roughly this year's salary.  With today's rebound I "gained" a little over 2 month's salary back.

Down $300k since the drop started or 2.5 years salary.  It sucks being out of the two comma club, but this will pass eventually while I continue on pace buying cheap shares for the time being (I only buy on the 1st of every month though).
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: ctuser1 on March 17, 2020, 06:15:39 AM
I'm down $260k from 1/18. I'm no longer worth a million *even* if I count my home equity (which is likely to be down anyway into a recession), emergency fund, kids 529 etc. etc.

Holy crap, this shit feels real now!!

What is different for me from 2008, and is bothering me, is that fact that I feel powerless in front of the market gyrations right now. In 2008, I had < $100k in the market and any market losses were significantly made up by the new money I was shoveling in.

Now, the magnitude of these losses are so large that I feel powerless to do anything about it.

That feels - difficult!
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: ZsaZsa on March 17, 2020, 07:39:17 AM
About $55,000. But as a gesture of faith, I did throw a spare $100 at my Robinhood account.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: appleshampooid on March 17, 2020, 07:45:38 AM
My wife and I were thiiiiiiis close to hitting $1MM total net worth (including everything, home equity, 529s, etc). I think we got to $990k and change before the crashes started. Now we're at $788k, so we have lost about $200k. It hurts for sure, but I am looking on the bright sides, clearing out old investments that are now at a loss and harvesting capital losses. In addition to buying at a discount.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: YttriumNitrate on March 17, 2020, 11:48:23 AM
Down about a year's gross pay, and taking advantage of it is much as possible:
**Invested three months gross pay this morning
**Refi-ing house to 30 year fixed at 3.25%
**If we get another 15% drop, I'll be using the dip to simplify my taxable portfolio

And there goes another year's gross pay. ;-). It's interesting to see how the fear has grown in the last two weeks. We're definitely not yet at the level of 2008, but we're starting to get close.

2020 is shaping up to be the second great buying opportunity of my working career.

Up to three years pay (or the entire value of my primary residence). Ouch! On the plus side, today I was able to cleanup and simplify up my portfolio without incurring capital gains. Cut out five funds from my portfolio, including one that I had held since 2002.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Alternatepriorities on March 17, 2020, 12:39:10 PM
What is different for me from 2008, and is bothering me, is that fact that I feel powerless in front of the market gyrations right now. In 2008, I had < $100k in the market and any market losses were significantly made up by the new money I was shoveling in.

Now, the magnitude of these losses are so large that I feel powerless to do anything about it.

That feels - difficult!

Iíve noticed the same difference myself and it has made me think about ideas for an AA that adjusts based on a stash/income or stash/stashing ratio. When my stash was 2 years of savings my income was a lot more like a bond allocation that allowed me to buy stocks while they were on sale. If the market drops 50% I just double the shares I own in a single year. Now that the stash is many times what I can save in a year that doesnít work as well. Iím still confident the long term average will be fine but Iím definitely glad weíre not selling now to fund our cost of living. 
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: J Boogie on March 17, 2020, 12:45:47 PM
In my "self-directed" 401k, I'm down 8% over the past 6 months which is about when I started picking stocks.

It represents about half of my invested assets. The rest are in SPY and total market funds, which are down about 17% over the past 6 months.

So I guess I'm down about $12,000. No biggie. I'm 33 and I increased my contributions a little bit.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: vand on March 17, 2020, 12:48:40 PM
What is different for me from 2008, and is bothering me, is that fact that I feel powerless in front of the market gyrations right now. In 2008, I had < $100k in the market and any market losses were significantly made up by the new money I was shoveling in.

Now, the magnitude of these losses are so large that I feel powerless to do anything about it.

That feels - difficult!

Iíve noticed the same difference myself and it has made me think about ideas for an AA that adjusts based on a stash/income or stash/stashing ratio. When my stash was 2 years of savings my income was a lot more like a bond allocation that allowed me to buy stocks while they were on sale. If the market drops 50% I just double the shares I own in a single year. Now that the stash is many times what I can save in a year that doesnít work as well. Iím still confident the long term average will be fine but Iím definitely glad weíre not selling now to fund our cost of living.

Right. And this is totally logical.

If you stash is still in its infancy and you can easily replace any drop in its value from just a few monthly buys then it makes total sense to be aggresssive.

But if your stash has been built up over years and greatly exceeds your income, a drop in value is a direct drop in your net worth that can't easily be replaced, so it makes much sense to be more cautious.

Remember that emotionally drops hurt more than gains make you feel good, something like x2.5. This is hard-wired into our survival instinct. It makes total sense that you want to prioritize protecting a large portfolio rather positioning it for maximum future gains.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: frugalnacho on March 17, 2020, 01:56:58 PM
What is different for me from 2008, and is bothering me, is that fact that I feel powerless in front of the market gyrations right now. In 2008, I had < $100k in the market and any market losses were significantly made up by the new money I was shoveling in.

Now, the magnitude of these losses are so large that I feel powerless to do anything about it.

That feels - difficult!

Iíve noticed the same difference myself and it has made me think about ideas for an AA that adjusts based on a stash/income or stash/stashing ratio. When my stash was 2 years of savings my income was a lot more like a bond allocation that allowed me to buy stocks while they were on sale. If the market drops 50% I just double the shares I own in a single year. Now that the stash is many times what I can save in a year that doesnít work as well. Iím still confident the long term average will be fine but Iím definitely glad weíre not selling now to fund our cost of living.

Right. And this is totally logical.

If you stash is still in its infancy and you can easily replace any drop in its value from just a few monthly buys then it makes total sense to be aggresssive.

But if your stash has been built up over years and greatly exceeds your income, a drop in value is a direct drop in your net worth that can't easily be replaced, so it makes much sense to be more cautious.

Remember that emotionally drops hurt more than gains make you feel good, something like x2.5. This is hard-wired into our survival instinct. It makes total sense that you want to prioritize protecting a large portfolio rather positioning it for maximum future gains.

This is only logical if you are near retirement and subject to SORR, in which case you probably should have adjusted your asset allocation before then, or at least had a plan in place and know that you are taking a calculated risk and might need to work longer.  If you aren't recently retired, or planning to retire soon, then I don't see how it makes a difference or why you need to "protect" your portfolio.  I'm probably 5+ years away from retirement, and I'm 100% stocks, and I probably "lost" $150k in the last month.  The flip side of that is that some of the past years I was making more in market gains than I was able to contribute.  I don't need any of this money until I retire so I am willing to take that risk of being temporarily down a huge amount now in order to be permanently up a huge amount in the long run.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Alternatepriorities on March 17, 2020, 02:57:03 PM
I think we are in very similar positions frugalnacho. Iíve been willing to accept higher risk for long term gains but I think I should probably start to change that in a couple years maybe when we (again) his skinny FI. And definitely once DW starts to think more about retiring. I could very well switched to fun work only by the end of this year without the crash and I still might.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: ChpBstrd on March 17, 2020, 07:20:55 PM
Around $120,000 at the moment. That kinda stings a little!

So I sold a thousand bucks worth of put options on the nursing home company in Washington state that was one of the first places hit by the virus.

LEEEROY JENKINS!!!
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Dicey on March 17, 2020, 07:54:16 PM
Still haven't looked. Meh.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: vand on March 18, 2020, 12:40:47 PM
My total net worth is down from £265k at mid-Feb peak to £224k after today, but in reality I have thrown in another £8k in to the market during that time, so portfolio performance should be down to about £216k, about -19%.

As the crash has unfolded I have found that my attitude has changed; at first nobody wants to see their net worth fall, but now that it has taken hold I've accepted this is a necessary event and welcome more falls because I just want to get it out of the way.

How are other feeling now?


Reckon I'm probably around 23-24% down now, and it's getting to the point where each further percent loss is hurting incrementally more than the last.

At least I have my monthly buy going into the market tomorrow, so should be hitting near the lows of the bear market so far.

This market action is absolutely crazy. The market is moving in a single session by amounts that we usually talk about it moving in a whole year. I have seen a lot of stuff following markets over the last 20 years and this last month has surpassed anything I have ever seen.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: RainyDay on March 18, 2020, 01:53:09 PM
Holy crap, this shit feels real now!!

What is different for me from 2008, and is bothering me, is that fact that I feel powerless in front of the market gyrations right now. In 2008, I had < $100k in the market and any market losses were significantly made up by the new money I was shoveling in.

Now, the magnitude of these losses are so large that I feel powerless to do anything about it.

That feels - difficult!

Same here!  In 2008 I didn't have that much to lose and, being so far from retirement, wasn't paying that close attention anyway.  Now I'm planning to FIRE at the end of 2022 and it's looking less and less likely.  Kinda depressing, even though a lot of people on the forum seem to be celebrating the massive drop(s).
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: ixtap on March 18, 2020, 02:30:53 PM
DH's t401k contributions (just completed for the year) equal his 401k losses for the year. The beginning balance and the current balance are within $100 of each other. Since this was Fidelity right at close, that was probably yesterday and today he has lost more yet. This is where he keeps all of his bonds and even some for me, so those losses are minimized. But all the new money for the year is in stocks, we won't rebalance until June.

As for retiring in 2022, as long as the market is back to Dec 2019 levels by then, we will be in good shape. That is when we hit our minimum number and we will keep investing through this. If the market hasn't recovered in two years, I am not sure that retirement will be our biggest concern.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: vand on March 18, 2020, 02:30:58 PM
What is different for me from 2008, and is bothering me, is that fact that I feel powerless in front of the market gyrations right now. In 2008, I had < $100k in the market and any market losses were significantly made up by the new money I was shoveling in.

Now, the magnitude of these losses are so large that I feel powerless to do anything about it.

That feels - difficult!

Iíve noticed the same difference myself and it has made me think about ideas for an AA that adjusts based on a stash/income or stash/stashing ratio. When my stash was 2 years of savings my income was a lot more like a bond allocation that allowed me to buy stocks while they were on sale. If the market drops 50% I just double the shares I own in a single year. Now that the stash is many times what I can save in a year that doesnít work as well. Iím still confident the long term average will be fine but Iím definitely glad weíre not selling now to fund our cost of living.

Right. And this is totally logical.

If you stash is still in its infancy and you can easily replace any drop in its value from just a few monthly buys then it makes total sense to be aggresssive.

But if your stash has been built up over years and greatly exceeds your income, a drop in value is a direct drop in your net worth that can't easily be replaced, so it makes much sense to be more cautious.

Remember that emotionally drops hurt more than gains make you feel good, something like x2.5. This is hard-wired into our survival instinct. It makes total sense that you want to prioritize protecting a large portfolio rather positioning it for maximum future gains.

This is only logical if you are near retirement and subject to SORR, in which case you probably should have adjusted your asset allocation before then, or at least had a plan in place and know that you are taking a calculated risk and might need to work longer.  If you aren't recently retired, or planning to retire soon, then I don't see how it makes a difference or why you need to "protect" your portfolio.  I'm probably 5+ years away from retirement, and I'm 100% stocks, and I probably "lost" $150k in the last month.  The flip side of that is that some of the past years I was making more in market gains than I was able to contribute.  I don't need any of this money until I retire so I am willing to take that risk of being temporarily down a huge amount now in order to be permanently up a huge amount in the long run.

And this is only logical if you are 100% convinced that stocks will recover by the time you are hoping to sell. There are examples in history where people have died waiting for the turnaround that never came.


The point is that we buy whatever we do because we believe ultimately that it will be worth more in the future.

When the market goes up in a short period of time it reaffirms our belief, even if we are only riding the right side of short term volatility.

When the market goes against you it challenges that belief; the more it goes against you the more and more it challenges your belief and you start to question everything you thought you knew about markets and investing. That is very understandably human nature.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: vand on March 27, 2020, 03:29:30 AM
On a time weighted basis I was down about -21% at the very nadir, but the bounce this week has recovered a lot of those losses since, and now sitting at -11%.

On a money weighted basis I've been able to shove some more money in, so down about -8%

Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Michael in ABQ on March 27, 2020, 07:04:31 AM
From peak in mid-February to (the current) bottom paper losses were about $25k. In the last few days recovered about $5k so down about $20k total. However, I'm still ahead of where I was a year ago due to increasing my contributions up to 25% from about 10% last year.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: hodedofome on March 27, 2020, 12:54:34 PM
My trading account went from $112k to start the year, up to $150k middle of February, and hit a low of $79k early this week before bouncing with the rest of the market.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: ChpBstrd on March 27, 2020, 02:31:11 PM
One mortgage, plus one new Honda civic, plus the new mountain bike I was drooling over before this whole situation.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: wienerdog on March 27, 2020, 03:32:12 PM
With today's market close my NW is 91.5% of where I was when the spreadsheet was last updated March 1st.  Still got a couple more days before anything gets put on paper and I make another contribution at the end of the month.  Anything in between is just a memory that will soon go bye bye.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: johndoe on March 28, 2020, 09:18:54 AM
I like dorking out with Personal Capital during things like this; I'm surprised so many of you with higher N.W. than me (and more on the line) don't track things closer.  Well apparently I've beaten "US Stock" since Valentine's Day of this year and last, WoOhOo!
(https://i.imgur.com/Ie5FA4t.png)
I also find it funny to read back through this thread/whole board and see the tone change in ~month.  (I'm not trying to say any one user has done an about face, just in general)
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Jack0Life on March 29, 2020, 09:44:41 AM
My investments are down ~$30k (~20%).  My net worth is down ~10%.  I'm shocked how well the average person on here takes this considering how carefully we squirrel away funds.  Seeing two years' worth of expenses vaporize in a matter of days is very frustrating and I have a hard time believing people are so willing to accept it.  I can wrap my head around "ok NOW the assets are on 'sale'" so continue buying, but if that's the analogy then I was overpaying for the last 3 YEARS.

I will leave 401k contributions untouched but have tinkered with my taxable account.  I know nothing about this stuff, but boy it's hard to stand on the train tracks when you hear the whistle.  I started reading /r/wallstreetbets as a joke, but I'll be damned if they weren't right about this virus!

I'm with you on your perception.
This was a freight train coming and you stood on the track hoping it would stop.
People downplayed it saying its on a loss on paper but it will take 2-4 yrs(maybe ?) to get back to what it was so you lost yourself that much time.  Its a LOSS on matter how you look at it.
Some also mention that its like going back in time and being able to buy stocks at a discount. YEAH, its great to buy stocks at a discount but you still have a current portfolio that just took a 10=30% loss.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Jack0Life on March 29, 2020, 09:46:06 AM
My wife and I were thiiiiiiis close to hitting $1MM total net worth (including everything, home equity, 529s, etc). I think we got to $990k and change before the crashes started. Now we're at $788k, so we have lost about $200k. It hurts for sure, but I am looking on the bright sides, clearing out old investments that are now at a loss and harvesting capital losses. In addition to buying at a discount.

Awe man, I was right with you. We were sitting on $992k waiting to celebrate being Millionaires but it wasn't meant to be.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: cool7hand on April 10, 2020, 05:57:31 AM
After rebalancing weekly and this week's surge, we are right back where we started. How about others?
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Malcat on April 10, 2020, 06:00:42 AM
Still don't know, still haven't looked.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: frugalnacho on April 10, 2020, 07:46:44 AM
For some reason according to zillow the value of my house has actually increased $11k in the last couple of months and is at a record valuation.  I'm very skeptical of that value since we are already in a recession and I doubt I could sell my house at all, let alone the valuation zillow has it at.

I calculate my networth on the first of every month, so I missed the "top" in mid february. 

With both those factors in mind I'm still down a little over $100k.  If I adjust my home's value, and adjust for what I estimate my mid month peak networth actually was, I'd guess I'm down closer $130-140k. 
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Daisyedwards800 on April 10, 2020, 10:02:26 AM
I had been following the situation in Wuhan closely in January and put 70% of my holdings into cash at the time.  Since the bottom I've put about 20-30% of that amount back in.  I still have $150,000 out of $343,000 out of the market now.  I plan to put in on Monday or Tuesday back in.

So far my total net losses are about $10k down from $353,000 at the top.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: bacchi on April 10, 2020, 10:16:45 AM
I also only look at the end of the month. I was down ~25% from 1/31 to 3/31.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: jim555 on April 10, 2020, 10:43:22 AM
-1.7%
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: magnet18 on April 10, 2020, 11:32:23 AM
With the recent rally and buying the dip, currently down a paltry $4,500 of my what was once $170k NW

Remaining buckled, the roller coaster has not yet returned to the station

Whhhhhhheeeeeeeeeeeee
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: wienerdog on April 10, 2020, 01:03:18 PM

People downplayed it saying its on a loss on paper but it will take 2-4 yrs(maybe ?) to get back to what it was so you lost yourself that much time.  Its a LOSS on matter how you look at it.
Some also mention that its like going back in time and being able to buy stocks at a discount. YEAH, its great to buy stocks at a discount but you still have a current portfolio that just took a 10=30% loss.

Are you sure on the 2 - 4 years?  I am at 94.5% of my peak NW that was a high on Feb 1, 2020.  Any point in between is just noise and I didn't worry about stopping anything.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Heckler on April 10, 2020, 01:21:52 PM

Are you sure on the 2 - 4 years?  I am at 94.5% of my peak NW that was a high on Feb 1, 2020.  Any point in between is just noise and I didn't worry about stopping anything.

So, what's happening out there in the world of stocks?  I wrote down my quarterly AA evaluation on March 1, and my holdings were +$50,000 from my December 1 evaluation.  Curious where June 1 is looking.


I did do make a minor mistake when my company cancelled the RRSP match and layed off people and cut out pay and working hours for everyone else by 20%.  I dropped my bi-weekly RSP contributions from 50% down to 5% because I'm going to max it out this year.  I really should have pumped it up by 5%, but my partner got told she wouldn't be starting her new job April 1, so I kinda freaked out for a bit.  I think next pay I'll bump it back up, but it'll be too late for the firesale.

I'm tempted to sell my $21K short term bonds "big emergency" fund in exchange for some equity though.  (the "small emergency" fund is $24k cash still, and there's no plan to touch it until July when property taxes are due if she doesn't start working by then) 
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: BTDretire on April 11, 2020, 07:53:09 AM
As of today, stock/bond portfolio down 14%, networth* down 9.6%.
 I did sell about 20% of my tax deferred stock before or on 2-28 and bought back in on 3-25.
 I bought back over 17% cheaper than I sold, with I bought back to soon, only the future will tell.

"I don't included my home in networth.

Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: vand on April 11, 2020, 12:30:13 PM
In money weighted (ie net worth) terms I've clawed back to just -6% from mid-Feb peak.

The FI dream is still alive!

Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Dicey on April 11, 2020, 03:23:32 PM
I'm still not looking, but DH checked last night and said we're only down 10% from our high. Hooray for a balanced portfolio?
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: johndoe on April 11, 2020, 06:03:32 PM
Hooray for a balanced portfolio?

Hooray for QE!
(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcQ-cAVmjocBrd3EizPRGoXnLts_SVL0JwmmMh3UEa975J4XZc1Z&usqp=CAU)
https://brrr.money/
https://youtu.be/O1hCLBTD5RM
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Retire-Canada on April 13, 2020, 10:06:32 AM
Help me laugh it off by posting yours correction "losses"

I'm not looking at my portfolio more than once a quarter when dividends come in, but I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything. I own just as many shares in amazing companies as I did back in early-Feb. In fact more because I have been buying when I have spare cash.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: MustacheAndaHalf on April 29, 2020, 10:53:39 AM
In the past day, I went from about a -3% loss to a +3% gain, compared to my portfolio at the end of 2019.  I'm still kinda stunned and surprised.  So far, I've seen none of my individual stock picks default, which I didn't expect... to the contrary, they've gone from 1/4th of my portfolio to over 1/3rd.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: hodedofome on April 29, 2020, 12:08:32 PM
The past few weeks I finally got my trading account back to breakeven. Today I'm up around 7%. My IRA which is 100% tech stocks is up about 10% for the year, drug down by AAPL and MSFT which have not hit their all time highs yet.

Kids' college accounts are still down about 20% from me trying to pick a bottom using TQQQ. It'll be a bit before those are above water.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: GuitarStv on April 29, 2020, 12:55:02 PM
I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: dresden on April 29, 2020, 05:52:25 PM
stocks are still off their highs but very close - although it seems like the recent run-up is mostly a sugar rush and not based on actual solutions to the problems we face.

I made the decision to get out of stocks today since the recent run up is giving me a second chance to get out without accepting losses - seems like upside is minimal and downside risk if very high considering the massive unemployment jumps and supply chain problems globally.

There is really no good place to put money, I have some left in bonds but honestly 0% for the next few months doesn't seem so bad considering the risk of staying in for a chance to go higher.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: facepalm on April 29, 2020, 06:15:20 PM
After rebalancing weekly and this week's surge, we are right back where we started. How about others?
At the end of March I was down 11.6%. This month I'm up 7.2%. Fun times.

Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: vand on April 30, 2020, 02:43:14 AM
Time weighted about -6% from peak, money-weighted I'm pretty much back at peak after getting paid today.

Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: vand on April 30, 2020, 02:46:13 AM
I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.

it's weirder that people won't mark to market.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: GuitarStv on April 30, 2020, 08:56:43 AM
I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.

it's weirder that people won't mark to market.

No issue with marking to market . . . but that is not a real loss.  Not unless you sell.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Michael in ABQ on April 30, 2020, 08:58:53 AM
Investments dropped by $25k from peak in February to bottom in March. Back up about $15k as of today, though that's with probably $5k in new money over the last two months with just regular contributions.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: dresden on April 30, 2020, 09:56:59 AM
I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.

it's weirder that people won't mark to market.

No issue with marking to market . . . but that is not a real loss.  Not unless you sell.
  It's a loss in net worth regardless of whether you sell or not.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: seattlecyclone on April 30, 2020, 10:13:31 AM
As of yesterday my 401(k) is worth more than when I retired last summer.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: GuitarStv on April 30, 2020, 10:51:02 AM
I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.

it's weirder that people won't mark to market.

No issue with marking to market . . . but that is not a real loss.  Not unless you sell.
  It's a loss in net worth regardless of whether you sell or not.

No, it's not.

Stock has no value while it's in the market.  It's only when it's sold and converted to cash that there is value.

If you pay 1000$ for 1 stock, then the value of the stock goes to 1$ . . . you still have 100% of what you purchased - 1 stock.  You haven't lost anything.  The same holds true for the 'value' of a home.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: MustacheAndaHalf on April 30, 2020, 11:34:09 AM
I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.
it's weirder that people won't mark to market.
No issue with marking to market . . . but that is not a real loss.  Not unless you sell.
  It's a loss in net worth regardless of whether you sell or not.
No, it's not.

Stock has no value while it's in the market.  It's only when it's sold and converted to cash that there is value.

If you pay 1000$ for 1 stock, then the value of the stock goes to 1$ . . . you still have 100% of what you purchased - 1 stock.  You haven't lost anything.  The same holds true for the 'value' of a home.
So if someone pays you $20 to transfer all your stocks over to to them, you would do that?
Because "stock has no value while it's in the market"?
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Dicey on April 30, 2020, 11:35:42 AM
I finally looked. We're just about where we were in early-to-mid Feb. Huh.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Retire-Canada on April 30, 2020, 11:36:09 AM
So if someone pays you $20 to transfer all your stocks over to to them, you would do that?
Because "stock has no value while it's in the market"?

That's not a sensible rebuttal.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: GuitarStv on April 30, 2020, 11:40:07 AM
I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.
it's weirder that people won't mark to market.
No issue with marking to market . . . but that is not a real loss.  Not unless you sell.
  It's a loss in net worth regardless of whether you sell or not.
No, it's not.

Stock has no value while it's in the market.  It's only when it's sold and converted to cash that there is value.

If you pay 1000$ for 1 stock, then the value of the stock goes to 1$ . . . you still have 100% of what you purchased - 1 stock.  You haven't lost anything.  The same holds true for the 'value' of a home.
So if someone pays you $20 to transfer all your stocks over to to them, you would do that?
Because "stock has no value while it's in the market"?

No.

I believe that when I sell my stocks they'll be more valuable than 20$ eventually.

It's also why I don't really care about the current instantaneous price of my stocks.  I believe that they'll be worth more later.  If I go to sell them and they don't seem to be worth enough, then I'll have to wait a bit longer and try again.  But my wealth doesn't change.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: MustacheAndaHalf on April 30, 2020, 11:47:01 AM
Stock has no value while it's in the market.  It's only when it's sold and converted to cash that there is value.
So if someone pays you $20 to transfer all your stocks over to to them, you would do that?
Because "stock has no value while it's in the market"?
No.

I believe that when I sell my stocks they'll be more valuable than 20$ eventually.

It's also why I don't really care about the current instantaneous price of my stocks.  I believe that they'll be worth more later.  If I go to sell them and they don't seem to be worth enough, then I'll have to wait a bit longer and try again.  But my wealth doesn't change.
That's the contradiction I was getting at by asking the question.  If you believe something will go up in value, then it has value now.  But that contradicts your assertion that stocks have no value in the market.

More broadly, no investment firm agrees with your definition.  All provide account statements showing the current value of investments, because stocks have value in the market.  If you go against a widely accepted definition, the burden is on you to show why everyone else isn't using your definition.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: dresden on April 30, 2020, 11:49:20 AM
I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.

it's weirder that people won't mark to market.

No issue with marking to market . . . but that is not a real loss.  Not unless you sell.
  It's a loss in net worth regardless of whether you sell or not.

No, it's not.

Stock has no value while it's in the market.  It's only when it's sold and converted to cash that there is value.

If you pay 1000$ for 1 stock, then the value of the stock goes to 1$ . . . you still have 100% of what you purchased - 1 stock.  You haven't lost anything.  The same holds true for the 'value' of a home.

Well I am not going to argue with you, but google the term "net worth" and you will be hard pressed to find a source that says it's the value you paid rather than current value.  You would be hard pressed to find a source that says stocks are worth 0 unless sold when there is an easy way to assess the value of stocks.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: johndoe on April 30, 2020, 04:12:41 PM
If you pay 1000$ for 1 stock, then the value of the stock goes to 1$ . . . you still have 100% of what you purchased - 1 stock.  You haven't lost anything.  The same holds true for the 'value' of a home.

I went to trade in my car that I bought new in 1980 and the darndest thing happened!  The dealer said he wouldn't give me what I paid for it!  I said, "What the heck, I haven't lost anything - I still have 100% of what I purchased - 1 car!"

I went to sell the land that I bought in 1980 and the darndest thing happened!  The realtor offered me MORE than I paid for it!  It's so bizarre because I had the same acreage the whole time.  I had to correct him and tell him it was only worth what I paid for it.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Travis on May 01, 2020, 05:44:48 AM
1st of the month contributions and spreadsheeting complete. Back to where I was in Sept 2019.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: wienerdog on May 01, 2020, 06:36:54 AM
1st of the month update and I am at 95.7% of my peak NW on 2/1/2020.  Or if I look back in time I am in between Sept 1 and Oct 1 2019 and that is with having a new car loan debt that I took on in November 2019.

On a side note this one time I went for a home loan and didn't think it was any of their business to be asking me about the stocks and bonds that I owned so I said none.  I didn't get the loan.

The next time for some damn reason I got asked the exact same thing.  Believe it or not with the same job and same salary I showed them my $457,000 taxable account and they actually gave me a loan on the house that I loved.  It was $175,000 and I had the exact same $10,000 cash down payment as before.  The funniest thing was the house I tried to buy before was only $110,000.  Go figure.

Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: K-ice on June 16, 2020, 10:51:23 AM
I was back in the black by May 29th. I unfortunately invested quite a lot in January.  The total swing was about 23%. The dollar amounts were terrifying.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: Daisyedwards800 on June 16, 2020, 03:51:18 PM
I'm up 10% on the year as of yesterday
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: MustacheAndaHalf on June 17, 2020, 09:07:15 AM
To find my YTD performance, I divide my current portfolio (with no added money) to my portfolio as of Dec 31st (per my account statement).  I also track how I'm doing against a benchmark of VTI / VXUS / VTEB (equally weighted).

My portfolio without contributions gained +18% since Dec 31st, compared to my benchmark being -4%, so overall I'm ahead +22% for now.

Most of the gain stems from one decision: near the market bottom, I used about 1/4th of my portfolio to buy deeply discounted individual stocks.  I plan to hold them until bankruptcy or recovery.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: vand on June 20, 2020, 12:09:11 PM
I'm now about +2% time weighted, and +8% money weighted from my mid/late Feb previous high.

Being underweight equities heading into the crash, deploying all my available cash in March-April and my sizeable holdings in gold and gold miners have all proven to be good portfolio allocation decisions this year.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: hodedofome on June 20, 2020, 01:11:33 PM
A little while back I decided to go 100% in tech stocks and heavy in software stocks I know well. Both my trading account and IRA are up 35%+ on the year.
Title: Re: What are your correction "losses"
Post by: stylesjl on June 21, 2020, 02:11:56 PM
Zero since I didn't sell. But this week I went from $4000 above my purchasing price to -$2300. Still not selling, in fact I might even start shovelling a bit more in. Overall had $60,000 in the market.
At this stage I am -$7000 on stocks. Interestingly though I recently updated my entire networth and found that in the past three months it went up by 0.36%. Mainly due to the fact that I was still accumulating additional savings in that time that offset the decline.