Author Topic: What are your correction "losses"  (Read 12841 times)

cool7hand

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #150 on: April 10, 2020, 05:57:31 AM »
After rebalancing weekly and this week's surge, we are right back where we started. How about others?

Malcat

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #151 on: April 10, 2020, 06:00:42 AM »
Still don't know, still haven't looked.

frugalnacho

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #152 on: April 10, 2020, 07:46:44 AM »
For some reason according to zillow the value of my house has actually increased $11k in the last couple of months and is at a record valuation.  I'm very skeptical of that value since we are already in a recession and I doubt I could sell my house at all, let alone the valuation zillow has it at.

I calculate my networth on the first of every month, so I missed the "top" in mid february. 

With both those factors in mind I'm still down a little over $100k.  If I adjust my home's value, and adjust for what I estimate my mid month peak networth actually was, I'd guess I'm down closer $130-140k. 

Daisyedwards800

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #153 on: April 10, 2020, 10:02:26 AM »
I had been following the situation in Wuhan closely in January and put 70% of my holdings into cash at the time.  Since the bottom I've put about 20-30% of that amount back in.  I still have $150,000 out of $343,000 out of the market now.  I plan to put in on Monday or Tuesday back in.

So far my total net losses are about $10k down from $353,000 at the top.

bacchi

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #154 on: April 10, 2020, 10:16:45 AM »
I also only look at the end of the month. I was down ~25% from 1/31 to 3/31.

jim555

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #155 on: April 10, 2020, 10:43:22 AM »
-1.7%

magnet18

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #156 on: April 10, 2020, 11:32:23 AM »
With the recent rally and buying the dip, currently down a paltry $4,500 of my what was once $170k NW

Remaining buckled, the roller coaster has not yet returned to the station

Whhhhhhheeeeeeeeeeeee

wienerdog

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #157 on: April 10, 2020, 01:03:18 PM »

People downplayed it saying its on a loss on paper but it will take 2-4 yrs(maybe ?) to get back to what it was so you lost yourself that much time.  Its a LOSS on matter how you look at it.
Some also mention that its like going back in time and being able to buy stocks at a discount. YEAH, its great to buy stocks at a discount but you still have a current portfolio that just took a 10=30% loss.

Are you sure on the 2 - 4 years?  I am at 94.5% of my peak NW that was a high on Feb 1, 2020.  Any point in between is just noise and I didn't worry about stopping anything.

Heckler

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #158 on: April 10, 2020, 01:21:52 PM »

Are you sure on the 2 - 4 years?  I am at 94.5% of my peak NW that was a high on Feb 1, 2020.  Any point in between is just noise and I didn't worry about stopping anything.

So, what's happening out there in the world of stocks?  I wrote down my quarterly AA evaluation on March 1, and my holdings were +$50,000 from my December 1 evaluation.  Curious where June 1 is looking.


I did do make a minor mistake when my company cancelled the RRSP match and layed off people and cut out pay and working hours for everyone else by 20%.  I dropped my bi-weekly RSP contributions from 50% down to 5% because I'm going to max it out this year.  I really should have pumped it up by 5%, but my partner got told she wouldn't be starting her new job April 1, so I kinda freaked out for a bit.  I think next pay I'll bump it back up, but it'll be too late for the firesale.

I'm tempted to sell my $21K short term bonds "big emergency" fund in exchange for some equity though.  (the "small emergency" fund is $24k cash still, and there's no plan to touch it until July when property taxes are due if she doesn't start working by then) 
« Last Edit: April 10, 2020, 01:43:02 PM by Heckler »

BTDretire

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #159 on: April 11, 2020, 07:53:09 AM »
As of today, stock/bond portfolio down 14%, networth* down 9.6%.
 I did sell about 20% of my tax deferred stock before or on 2-28 and bought back in on 3-25.
 I bought back over 17% cheaper than I sold, with I bought back to soon, only the future will tell.

"I don't included my home in networth.


vand

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #160 on: April 11, 2020, 12:30:13 PM »
In money weighted (ie net worth) terms I've clawed back to just -6% from mid-Feb peak.

The FI dream is still alive!

« Last Edit: April 11, 2020, 12:31:50 PM by vand »

Dicey

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #161 on: April 11, 2020, 03:23:32 PM »
I'm still not looking, but DH checked last night and said we're only down 10% from our high. Hooray for a balanced portfolio?

johndoe

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #162 on: April 11, 2020, 06:03:32 PM »

Retire-Canada

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #163 on: April 13, 2020, 10:06:32 AM »
Help me laugh it off by posting yours correction "losses"

I'm not looking at my portfolio more than once a quarter when dividends come in, but I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything. I own just as many shares in amazing companies as I did back in early-Feb. In fact more because I have been buying when I have spare cash.

MustacheAndaHalf

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #164 on: April 29, 2020, 10:53:39 AM »
In the past day, I went from about a -3% loss to a +3% gain, compared to my portfolio at the end of 2019.  I'm still kinda stunned and surprised.  So far, I've seen none of my individual stock picks default, which I didn't expect... to the contrary, they've gone from 1/4th of my portfolio to over 1/3rd.

hodedofome

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #165 on: April 29, 2020, 12:08:32 PM »
The past few weeks I finally got my trading account back to breakeven. Today I'm up around 7%. My IRA which is 100% tech stocks is up about 10% for the year, drug down by AAPL and MSFT which have not hit their all time highs yet.

Kids' college accounts are still down about 20% from me trying to pick a bottom using TQQQ. It'll be a bit before those are above water.

GuitarStv

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #166 on: April 29, 2020, 12:55:02 PM »
I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.

dresden

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #167 on: April 29, 2020, 05:52:25 PM »
stocks are still off their highs but very close - although it seems like the recent run-up is mostly a sugar rush and not based on actual solutions to the problems we face.

I made the decision to get out of stocks today since the recent run up is giving me a second chance to get out without accepting losses - seems like upside is minimal and downside risk if very high considering the massive unemployment jumps and supply chain problems globally.

There is really no good place to put money, I have some left in bonds but honestly 0% for the next few months doesn't seem so bad considering the risk of staying in for a chance to go higher.

facepalm

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #168 on: April 29, 2020, 06:15:20 PM »
After rebalancing weekly and this week's surge, we are right back where we started. How about others?
At the end of March I was down 11.6%. This month I'm up 7.2%. Fun times.


vand

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #169 on: April 30, 2020, 02:43:14 AM »
Time weighted about -6% from peak, money-weighted I'm pretty much back at peak after getting paid today.


vand

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #170 on: April 30, 2020, 02:46:13 AM »
I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.

it's weirder that people won't mark to market.

GuitarStv

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #171 on: April 30, 2020, 08:56:43 AM »
I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.

it's weirder that people won't mark to market.

No issue with marking to market . . . but that is not a real loss.  Not unless you sell.

Michael in ABQ

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #172 on: April 30, 2020, 08:58:53 AM »
Investments dropped by $25k from peak in February to bottom in March. Back up about $15k as of today, though that's with probably $5k in new money over the last two months with just regular contributions.

dresden

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #173 on: April 30, 2020, 09:56:59 AM »
I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.

it's weirder that people won't mark to market.

No issue with marking to market . . . but that is not a real loss.  Not unless you sell.
  It's a loss in net worth regardless of whether you sell or not.

seattlecyclone

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #174 on: April 30, 2020, 10:13:31 AM »
As of yesterday my 401(k) is worth more than when I retired last summer.

GuitarStv

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #175 on: April 30, 2020, 10:51:02 AM »
I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.

it's weirder that people won't mark to market.

No issue with marking to market . . . but that is not a real loss.  Not unless you sell.
  It's a loss in net worth regardless of whether you sell or not.

No, it's not.

Stock has no value while it's in the market.  It's only when it's sold and converted to cash that there is value.

If you pay 1000$ for 1 stock, then the value of the stock goes to 1$ . . . you still have 100% of what you purchased - 1 stock.  You haven't lost anything.  The same holds true for the 'value' of a home.

MustacheAndaHalf

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #176 on: April 30, 2020, 11:34:09 AM »
I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.
it's weirder that people won't mark to market.
No issue with marking to market . . . but that is not a real loss.  Not unless you sell.
  It's a loss in net worth regardless of whether you sell or not.
No, it's not.

Stock has no value while it's in the market.  It's only when it's sold and converted to cash that there is value.

If you pay 1000$ for 1 stock, then the value of the stock goes to 1$ . . . you still have 100% of what you purchased - 1 stock.  You haven't lost anything.  The same holds true for the 'value' of a home.
So if someone pays you $20 to transfer all your stocks over to to them, you would do that?
Because "stock has no value while it's in the market"?

Dicey

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #177 on: April 30, 2020, 11:35:42 AM »
I finally looked. We're just about where we were in early-to-mid Feb. Huh.

Retire-Canada

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #178 on: April 30, 2020, 11:36:09 AM »
So if someone pays you $20 to transfer all your stocks over to to them, you would do that?
Because "stock has no value while it's in the market"?

That's not a sensible rebuttal.

GuitarStv

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #179 on: April 30, 2020, 11:40:07 AM »
I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.
it's weirder that people won't mark to market.
No issue with marking to market . . . but that is not a real loss.  Not unless you sell.
  It's a loss in net worth regardless of whether you sell or not.
No, it's not.

Stock has no value while it's in the market.  It's only when it's sold and converted to cash that there is value.

If you pay 1000$ for 1 stock, then the value of the stock goes to 1$ . . . you still have 100% of what you purchased - 1 stock.  You haven't lost anything.  The same holds true for the 'value' of a home.
So if someone pays you $20 to transfer all your stocks over to to them, you would do that?
Because "stock has no value while it's in the market"?

No.

I believe that when I sell my stocks they'll be more valuable than 20$ eventually.

It's also why I don't really care about the current instantaneous price of my stocks.  I believe that they'll be worth more later.  If I go to sell them and they don't seem to be worth enough, then I'll have to wait a bit longer and try again.  But my wealth doesn't change.

MustacheAndaHalf

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #180 on: April 30, 2020, 11:47:01 AM »
Stock has no value while it's in the market.  It's only when it's sold and converted to cash that there is value.
So if someone pays you $20 to transfer all your stocks over to to them, you would do that?
Because "stock has no value while it's in the market"?
No.

I believe that when I sell my stocks they'll be more valuable than 20$ eventually.

It's also why I don't really care about the current instantaneous price of my stocks.  I believe that they'll be worth more later.  If I go to sell them and they don't seem to be worth enough, then I'll have to wait a bit longer and try again.  But my wealth doesn't change.
That's the contradiction I was getting at by asking the question.  If you believe something will go up in value, then it has value now.  But that contradicts your assertion that stocks have no value in the market.

More broadly, no investment firm agrees with your definition.  All provide account statements showing the current value of investments, because stocks have value in the market.  If you go against a widely accepted definition, the burden is on you to show why everyone else isn't using your definition.

dresden

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #181 on: April 30, 2020, 11:49:20 AM »
I don't have any "losses" because I have not sold anything.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.

it's weirder that people won't mark to market.

No issue with marking to market . . . but that is not a real loss.  Not unless you sell.
  It's a loss in net worth regardless of whether you sell or not.

No, it's not.

Stock has no value while it's in the market.  It's only when it's sold and converted to cash that there is value.

If you pay 1000$ for 1 stock, then the value of the stock goes to 1$ . . . you still have 100% of what you purchased - 1 stock.  You haven't lost anything.  The same holds true for the 'value' of a home.

Well I am not going to argue with you, but google the term "net worth" and you will be hard pressed to find a source that says it's the value you paid rather than current value.  You would be hard pressed to find a source that says stocks are worth 0 unless sold when there is an easy way to assess the value of stocks.

johndoe

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #182 on: April 30, 2020, 04:12:41 PM »
If you pay 1000$ for 1 stock, then the value of the stock goes to 1$ . . . you still have 100% of what you purchased - 1 stock.  You haven't lost anything.  The same holds true for the 'value' of a home.

I went to trade in my car that I bought new in 1980 and the darndest thing happened!  The dealer said he wouldn't give me what I paid for it!  I said, "What the heck, I haven't lost anything - I still have 100% of what I purchased - 1 car!"

I went to sell the land that I bought in 1980 and the darndest thing happened!  The realtor offered me MORE than I paid for it!  It's so bizarre because I had the same acreage the whole time.  I had to correct him and tell him it was only worth what I paid for it.

It's weird that people are having trouble understanding this.

Travis

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #183 on: May 01, 2020, 05:44:48 AM »
1st of the month contributions and spreadsheeting complete. Back to where I was in Sept 2019.

wienerdog

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #184 on: May 01, 2020, 06:36:54 AM »
1st of the month update and I am at 95.7% of my peak NW on 2/1/2020.  Or if I look back in time I am in between Sept 1 and Oct 1 2019 and that is with having a new car loan debt that I took on in November 2019.

On a side note this one time I went for a home loan and didn't think it was any of their business to be asking me about the stocks and bonds that I owned so I said none.  I didn't get the loan.

The next time for some damn reason I got asked the exact same thing.  Believe it or not with the same job and same salary I showed them my $457,000 taxable account and they actually gave me a loan on the house that I loved.  It was $175,000 and I had the exact same $10,000 cash down payment as before.  The funniest thing was the house I tried to buy before was only $110,000.  Go figure.


K-ice

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #185 on: June 16, 2020, 10:51:23 AM »
I was back in the black by May 29th. I unfortunately invested quite a lot in January.  The total swing was about 23%. The dollar amounts were terrifying.

Daisyedwards800

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #186 on: June 16, 2020, 03:51:18 PM »
I'm up 10% on the year as of yesterday

MustacheAndaHalf

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #187 on: June 17, 2020, 09:07:15 AM »
To find my YTD performance, I divide my current portfolio (with no added money) to my portfolio as of Dec 31st (per my account statement).  I also track how I'm doing against a benchmark of VTI / VXUS / VTEB (equally weighted).

My portfolio without contributions gained +18% since Dec 31st, compared to my benchmark being -4%, so overall I'm ahead +22% for now.

Most of the gain stems from one decision: near the market bottom, I used about 1/4th of my portfolio to buy deeply discounted individual stocks.  I plan to hold them until bankruptcy or recovery.

vand

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #188 on: June 20, 2020, 12:09:11 PM »
I'm now about +2% time weighted, and +8% money weighted from my mid/late Feb previous high.

Being underweight equities heading into the crash, deploying all my available cash in March-April and my sizeable holdings in gold and gold miners have all proven to be good portfolio allocation decisions this year.

hodedofome

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #189 on: June 20, 2020, 01:11:33 PM »
A little while back I decided to go 100% in tech stocks and heavy in software stocks I know well. Both my trading account and IRA are up 35%+ on the year.

stylesjl

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #190 on: June 21, 2020, 02:11:56 PM »
Zero since I didn't sell. But this week I went from $4000 above my purchasing price to -$2300. Still not selling, in fact I might even start shovelling a bit more in. Overall had $60,000 in the market.
At this stage I am -$7000 on stocks. Interestingly though I recently updated my entire networth and found that in the past three months it went up by 0.36%. Mainly due to the fact that I was still accumulating additional savings in that time that offset the decline.