Author Topic: What are your correction "losses"  (Read 13038 times)

Reynold

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #100 on: March 02, 2020, 04:10:55 PM »
Paper losses about 2x what I make in a year, or 5x living expenses, I haven't checked exactly.  I put $200k more into index funds Friday, like to buy on sale, looks like I was right not to wait until today (Monday) when the market rebounded 5%. 

I would not be surprised if it drops again, as supply chain disruptions continue, but if so I have some more I can invest. :)

Villanelle

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #101 on: March 02, 2020, 04:16:27 PM »
No idea, and not interested in spending the time it would take to figure it out. 

Travis

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #102 on: March 03, 2020, 02:09:49 AM »
From the 19th when this started and not including today's gains, I "lost" roughly this year's salary.  With today's rebound I "gained" a little over 2 month's salary back.

FireLane

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #103 on: March 04, 2020, 08:34:26 AM »
At the end of February, my portfolio was down $135,000. No sweat. Ten years from now, this will be an insignificant blip.

YttriumNitrate

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #104 on: March 10, 2020, 07:57:16 AM »
Down about a year's gross pay, and taking advantage of it is much as possible:
**Invested three months gross pay this morning
**Refi-ing house to 30 year fixed at 3.25%
**If we get another 15% drop, I'll be using the dip to simplify my taxable portfolio

And there goes another year's gross pay. ;-). It's interesting to see how the fear has grown in the last two weeks. We're definitely not yet at the level of 2008, but we're starting to get close.

2020 is shaping up to be the second great buying opportunity of my working career.

fattest_foot

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #105 on: March 10, 2020, 08:14:39 AM »
I kind of wish that we had calculated how much we had at the top in mid-February. But because I only do accounts at the end of the month, I really have no idea how much we had.

But my guess after yesterday's 7% drop is that we've probably crossed into six figure "losses" now. If we just go from the end of February when I last did our monthly count, we're probably down about 2 years worth of expenses.

v8rx7guy

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #106 on: March 10, 2020, 08:23:39 AM »
Down a decent C6 Vette...

ChpBstrd

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #107 on: March 11, 2020, 12:37:25 PM »
Down -7% vs the S&P at -19%. My protective puts are bottoming out, but I think we have further to fall so Iím holding my hedges for now. Hopefully this is the fall Iíve spent years preparing for.

KEEP FALLING! At 40% down, Iíll make my AA more aggressive.

vand

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #108 on: March 11, 2020, 01:14:07 PM »
I was pleasantly surprised to find my portfolio had stood up comparatively well when I finally totally it up over the weekend, down something like -7% from its mid-Feb peak. This week will have seen some further damage, however. NAV probably down 11-12% after today's hammering.


BFGirl

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #109 on: March 11, 2020, 01:26:02 PM »
75K

FireinNY

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #110 on: March 11, 2020, 01:34:11 PM »
60K as of yesterday.  Another 5-10K after today's market rout and I fully expect we could be headed for another rough couple of months as the coronavirus situation gets worse.

facepalm

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #111 on: March 11, 2020, 07:55:07 PM »
I think I'm down about 10%. Meh

ChpBstrd

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #112 on: March 12, 2020, 12:45:47 PM »
Has anyone done worse than the S&P 500? If so, how?

GuitarStv

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #113 on: March 12, 2020, 12:48:24 PM »
Has anyone done worse than the S&P 500? If so, how?

Invest in Boeing?

Alternatepriorities

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #114 on: March 12, 2020, 12:58:46 PM »
Has anyone done worse than the S&P 500? If so, how?

Invest in Boeing?

Or VDE

magnet18

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #115 on: March 16, 2020, 02:45:20 PM »
Down about 2/3rds of a house down payment

Buffaloski Boris

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #116 on: March 16, 2020, 03:24:35 PM »
As of today Im down a fairly nice new car.  Thats the bad news.  The good news is once these prices come down some more, I'll be in a good position to buy.

vand

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #117 on: March 16, 2020, 03:41:49 PM »
My total net worth is down from £265k at mid-Feb peak to £224k after today, but in reality I have thrown in another £8k in to the market during that time, so portfolio performance should be down to about £216k, about -19%.

As the crash has unfolded I have found that my attitude has changed; at first nobody wants to see their net worth fall, but now that it has taken hold I've accepted this is a necessary event and welcome more falls because I just want to get it out of the way.


Alternatepriorities

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #118 on: March 16, 2020, 04:01:24 PM »
My total net worth is down from £265k at mid-Feb peak to £224k after today, but in reality I have thrown in another £8k in to the market during that time, so portfolio performance should be down to about £216k, about -19%.

As the crash has unfolded I have found that my attitude has changed; at first nobody wants to see their net worth fall, but now that it has taken hold I've accepted this is a necessary event and welcome more falls because I just want to get it out of the way.

This.

Actually, one thing I've gained is the new realization that the stash size is really less important to my life and happiness than I made it out to be at the peak.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2020, 04:06:30 PM by Alternatepriorities »

TheAnonOne

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #119 on: March 16, 2020, 04:16:11 PM »
I am down almost 200k. I had 660k at the peek, down to 470ish.

So...

NW 840 -> 670
$$ 660 -> 470

I am around 90% VTSAX, the other 10% is a mixture of VTIAX(Int) and a small (10k) amount of tokens.

It doesn't really sting as bad as I thought. Now, if layoff start it will get bad but for now, I am buying something like 4-6k a month just in 401k + IRA contributions. I figure this will benefit me overall as long as I can stay employed!

geekette

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #120 on: March 16, 2020, 04:18:24 PM »
Bad news:  We're down a nice house (in our MCOL area)
Good news: We still have more than we retired with 7 years ago.  At least for now.  But still - ouch.

johndoe

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #121 on: March 16, 2020, 06:32:13 PM »
My investments are down ~$30k (~20%).  My net worth is down ~10%.  I'm shocked how well the average person on here takes this considering how carefully we squirrel away funds.  Seeing two years' worth of expenses vaporize in a matter of days is very frustrating and I have a hard time believing people are so willing to accept it.  I can wrap my head around "ok NOW the assets are on 'sale'" so continue buying, but if that's the analogy then I was overpaying for the last 3 YEARS.

I will leave 401k contributions untouched but have tinkered with my taxable account.  I know nothing about this stuff, but boy it's hard to stand on the train tracks when you hear the whistle.  I started reading /r/wallstreetbets as a joke, but I'll be damned if they weren't right about this virus!

vand

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #122 on: March 16, 2020, 07:22:32 PM »
My investments are down ~$30k (~20%).  My net worth is down ~10%.  I'm shocked how well the average person on here takes this considering how carefully we squirrel away funds.  Seeing two years' worth of expenses vaporize in a matter of days is very frustrating and I have a hard time believing people are so willing to accept it.  I can wrap my head around "ok NOW the assets are on 'sale'" so continue buying, but if that's the analogy then I was overpaying for the last 3 YEARS.

Unfortunately.. Yes. The market was asking you to pay $28 per $1 of profit, and you willingly did so. Don't beat yourself up about it, it's a part of the passive strategy and it just means that it will take longer for the buys at those prices to become profitable at a more sensible valuation, but if you stick to the strategy you will also hoover up your share when it is underpriced, so its swings and roundabouts.

As for people here being so sanguine about their losses, I can only speak for myself, but having been around for 2 major market meltdowns in my lifetime you learn that markets always over-react to a crisis, and these should be used as buying opportunities. If you're feeling bad about it then so is everyone else, and that is usually not a bad time to be buying.  I run a more defensive portfolio than many here, because I envision that the bulk of my stash will come from earnings contributed over the next few years when I finally hit my FI number, not from compounded returns, so why take on huge downside risk for only a couple of %age points more expected return.

There is a time to be more aggressive and a time to be more defensive, and now with the markets having had a good haircut and future expected earnings correspondingly raised, now is the time to dial up the risk a bit.

magnet18

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #123 on: March 16, 2020, 07:28:28 PM »
My investments are down ~$30k (~20%).  My net worth is down ~10%.  I'm shocked how well the average person on here takes this considering how carefully we squirrel away funds.  Seeing two years' worth of expenses vaporize in a matter of days is very frustrating and I have a hard time believing people are so willing to accept it.  I can wrap my head around "ok NOW the assets are on 'sale'" so continue buying, but if that's the analogy then I was overpaying for the last 3 YEARS.

I will leave 401k contributions untouched but have tinkered with my taxable account.  I know nothing about this stuff, but boy it's hard to stand on the train tracks when you hear the whistle.  I started reading /r/wallstreetbets as a joke, but I'll be damned if they weren't right about this virus!

I think about it like a time machine

This is a rare, rare opportunity to go back and invest 3 years ago, when I was personally not able to / frugal enough to invest at the level I am now

How often does life give you a time machine and let you go have a do-over?

I'm personally quite excited.

The NW hit I've already taken will be back before I'm ready to retire, and I have an unbelievable opportunity to shovel in more into this time machine and send back to 2017 or earlier depending on how this goes, and let it invest on fast forward


I'm aware this is a bit inaccurate because of dividend reinvesting, but you get the idea

fattest_foot

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #124 on: March 16, 2020, 08:00:27 PM »
Down about 2/3rds of a house down payment

Estimating here, but we're down about 70% of our entire mortgage. 170k vs 240k mortgage.

And speaking of ^ time machine, I've thought similarly. Except now we have salaries much higher than 3 years ago.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2020, 08:02:17 PM by fattest_foot »

Alternatepriorities

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #125 on: March 16, 2020, 10:37:16 PM »
My investments are down ~$30k (~20%).  My net worth is down ~10%.  I'm shocked how well the average person on here takes this considering how carefully we squirrel away funds.  Seeing two years' worth of expenses vaporize in a matter of days is very frustrating and I have a hard time believing people are so willing to accept it.  I can wrap my head around "ok NOW the assets are on 'sale'" so continue buying, but if that's the analogy then I was overpaying for the last 3 YEARS.

Unfortunately.. Yes. The market was asking you to pay $28 per $1 of profit, and you willingly did so. Don't beat yourself up about it, it's a part of the passive strategy and it just means that it will take longer for the buys at those prices to become profitable at a more sensible valuation, but if you stick to the strategy you will also hoover up your share when it is underpriced, so its swings and roundabouts.

As for people here being so sanguine about their losses, I can only speak for myself, but having been around for 2 major market meltdowns in my lifetime you learn that markets always over-react to a crisis, and these should be used as buying opportunities. If you're feeling bad about it then so is everyone else, and that is usually not a bad time to be buying.  I run a more defensive portfolio than many here, because I envision that the bulk of my stash will come from earnings contributed over the next few years when I finally hit my FI number, not from compounded returns, so why take on huge downside risk for only a couple of %age points more expected return.

There is a time to be more aggressive and a time to be more defensive, and now with the markets having had a good haircut and future expected earnings correspondingly raised, now is the time to dial up the risk a bit.

Thanks for the longer explanation on your thinking Vand. That helps some of the things youíve said elsewhere make more sense to me. 

Travis

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #126 on: March 17, 2020, 03:55:48 AM »
From the 19th when this started and not including today's gains, I "lost" roughly this year's salary.  With today's rebound I "gained" a little over 2 month's salary back.

Down $300k since the drop started or 2.5 years salary.  It sucks being out of the two comma club, but this will pass eventually while I continue on pace buying cheap shares for the time being (I only buy on the 1st of every month though).

ctuser1

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #127 on: March 17, 2020, 06:15:39 AM »
I'm down $260k from 1/18. I'm no longer worth a million *even* if I count my home equity (which is likely to be down anyway into a recession), emergency fund, kids 529 etc. etc.

Holy crap, this shit feels real now!!

What is different for me from 2008, and is bothering me, is that fact that I feel powerless in front of the market gyrations right now. In 2008, I had < $100k in the market and any market losses were significantly made up by the new money I was shoveling in.

Now, the magnitude of these losses are so large that I feel powerless to do anything about it.

That feels - difficult!

ZsaZsa

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #128 on: March 17, 2020, 07:39:17 AM »
About $55,000. But as a gesture of faith, I did throw a spare $100 at my Robinhood account.

appleshampooid

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #129 on: March 17, 2020, 07:45:38 AM »
My wife and I were thiiiiiiis close to hitting $1MM total net worth (including everything, home equity, 529s, etc). I think we got to $990k and change before the crashes started. Now we're at $788k, so we have lost about $200k. It hurts for sure, but I am looking on the bright sides, clearing out old investments that are now at a loss and harvesting capital losses. In addition to buying at a discount.

YttriumNitrate

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #130 on: March 17, 2020, 11:48:23 AM »
Down about a year's gross pay, and taking advantage of it is much as possible:
**Invested three months gross pay this morning
**Refi-ing house to 30 year fixed at 3.25%
**If we get another 15% drop, I'll be using the dip to simplify my taxable portfolio

And there goes another year's gross pay. ;-). It's interesting to see how the fear has grown in the last two weeks. We're definitely not yet at the level of 2008, but we're starting to get close.

2020 is shaping up to be the second great buying opportunity of my working career.

Up to three years pay (or the entire value of my primary residence). Ouch! On the plus side, today I was able to cleanup and simplify up my portfolio without incurring capital gains. Cut out five funds from my portfolio, including one that I had held since 2002.

Alternatepriorities

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #131 on: March 17, 2020, 12:39:10 PM »
What is different for me from 2008, and is bothering me, is that fact that I feel powerless in front of the market gyrations right now. In 2008, I had < $100k in the market and any market losses were significantly made up by the new money I was shoveling in.

Now, the magnitude of these losses are so large that I feel powerless to do anything about it.

That feels - difficult!

Iíve noticed the same difference myself and it has made me think about ideas for an AA that adjusts based on a stash/income or stash/stashing ratio. When my stash was 2 years of savings my income was a lot more like a bond allocation that allowed me to buy stocks while they were on sale. If the market drops 50% I just double the shares I own in a single year. Now that the stash is many times what I can save in a year that doesnít work as well. Iím still confident the long term average will be fine but Iím definitely glad weíre not selling now to fund our cost of living. 

J Boogie

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #132 on: March 17, 2020, 12:45:47 PM »
In my "self-directed" 401k, I'm down 8% over the past 6 months which is about when I started picking stocks.

It represents about half of my invested assets. The rest are in SPY and total market funds, which are down about 17% over the past 6 months.

So I guess I'm down about $12,000. No biggie. I'm 33 and I increased my contributions a little bit.

vand

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #133 on: March 17, 2020, 12:48:40 PM »
What is different for me from 2008, and is bothering me, is that fact that I feel powerless in front of the market gyrations right now. In 2008, I had < $100k in the market and any market losses were significantly made up by the new money I was shoveling in.

Now, the magnitude of these losses are so large that I feel powerless to do anything about it.

That feels - difficult!

Iíve noticed the same difference myself and it has made me think about ideas for an AA that adjusts based on a stash/income or stash/stashing ratio. When my stash was 2 years of savings my income was a lot more like a bond allocation that allowed me to buy stocks while they were on sale. If the market drops 50% I just double the shares I own in a single year. Now that the stash is many times what I can save in a year that doesnít work as well. Iím still confident the long term average will be fine but Iím definitely glad weíre not selling now to fund our cost of living.

Right. And this is totally logical.

If you stash is still in its infancy and you can easily replace any drop in its value from just a few monthly buys then it makes total sense to be aggresssive.

But if your stash has been built up over years and greatly exceeds your income, a drop in value is a direct drop in your net worth that can't easily be replaced, so it makes much sense to be more cautious.

Remember that emotionally drops hurt more than gains make you feel good, something like x2.5. This is hard-wired into our survival instinct. It makes total sense that you want to prioritize protecting a large portfolio rather positioning it for maximum future gains.

frugalnacho

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #134 on: March 17, 2020, 01:56:58 PM »
What is different for me from 2008, and is bothering me, is that fact that I feel powerless in front of the market gyrations right now. In 2008, I had < $100k in the market and any market losses were significantly made up by the new money I was shoveling in.

Now, the magnitude of these losses are so large that I feel powerless to do anything about it.

That feels - difficult!

Iíve noticed the same difference myself and it has made me think about ideas for an AA that adjusts based on a stash/income or stash/stashing ratio. When my stash was 2 years of savings my income was a lot more like a bond allocation that allowed me to buy stocks while they were on sale. If the market drops 50% I just double the shares I own in a single year. Now that the stash is many times what I can save in a year that doesnít work as well. Iím still confident the long term average will be fine but Iím definitely glad weíre not selling now to fund our cost of living.

Right. And this is totally logical.

If you stash is still in its infancy and you can easily replace any drop in its value from just a few monthly buys then it makes total sense to be aggresssive.

But if your stash has been built up over years and greatly exceeds your income, a drop in value is a direct drop in your net worth that can't easily be replaced, so it makes much sense to be more cautious.

Remember that emotionally drops hurt more than gains make you feel good, something like x2.5. This is hard-wired into our survival instinct. It makes total sense that you want to prioritize protecting a large portfolio rather positioning it for maximum future gains.

This is only logical if you are near retirement and subject to SORR, in which case you probably should have adjusted your asset allocation before then, or at least had a plan in place and know that you are taking a calculated risk and might need to work longer.  If you aren't recently retired, or planning to retire soon, then I don't see how it makes a difference or why you need to "protect" your portfolio.  I'm probably 5+ years away from retirement, and I'm 100% stocks, and I probably "lost" $150k in the last month.  The flip side of that is that some of the past years I was making more in market gains than I was able to contribute.  I don't need any of this money until I retire so I am willing to take that risk of being temporarily down a huge amount now in order to be permanently up a huge amount in the long run.

Alternatepriorities

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #135 on: March 17, 2020, 02:57:03 PM »
I think we are in very similar positions frugalnacho. Iíve been willing to accept higher risk for long term gains but I think I should probably start to change that in a couple years maybe when we (again) his skinny FI. And definitely once DW starts to think more about retiring. I could very well switched to fun work only by the end of this year without the crash and I still might.

ChpBstrd

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #136 on: March 17, 2020, 07:20:55 PM »
Around $120,000 at the moment. That kinda stings a little!

So I sold a thousand bucks worth of put options on the nursing home company in Washington state that was one of the first places hit by the virus.

LEEEROY JENKINS!!!

Dicey

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #137 on: March 17, 2020, 07:54:16 PM »
Still haven't looked. Meh.

vand

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #138 on: March 18, 2020, 12:40:47 PM »
My total net worth is down from £265k at mid-Feb peak to £224k after today, but in reality I have thrown in another £8k in to the market during that time, so portfolio performance should be down to about £216k, about -19%.

As the crash has unfolded I have found that my attitude has changed; at first nobody wants to see their net worth fall, but now that it has taken hold I've accepted this is a necessary event and welcome more falls because I just want to get it out of the way.

How are other feeling now?


Reckon I'm probably around 23-24% down now, and it's getting to the point where each further percent loss is hurting incrementally more than the last.

At least I have my monthly buy going into the market tomorrow, so should be hitting near the lows of the bear market so far.

This market action is absolutely crazy. The market is moving in a single session by amounts that we usually talk about it moving in a whole year. I have seen a lot of stuff following markets over the last 20 years and this last month has surpassed anything I have ever seen.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2020, 12:46:57 PM by vand »

RainyDay

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #139 on: March 18, 2020, 01:53:09 PM »
Holy crap, this shit feels real now!!

What is different for me from 2008, and is bothering me, is that fact that I feel powerless in front of the market gyrations right now. In 2008, I had < $100k in the market and any market losses were significantly made up by the new money I was shoveling in.

Now, the magnitude of these losses are so large that I feel powerless to do anything about it.

That feels - difficult!

Same here!  In 2008 I didn't have that much to lose and, being so far from retirement, wasn't paying that close attention anyway.  Now I'm planning to FIRE at the end of 2022 and it's looking less and less likely.  Kinda depressing, even though a lot of people on the forum seem to be celebrating the massive drop(s).

ixtap

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #140 on: March 18, 2020, 02:30:53 PM »
DH's t401k contributions (just completed for the year) equal his 401k losses for the year. The beginning balance and the current balance are within $100 of each other. Since this was Fidelity right at close, that was probably yesterday and today he has lost more yet. This is where he keeps all of his bonds and even some for me, so those losses are minimized. But all the new money for the year is in stocks, we won't rebalance until June.

As for retiring in 2022, as long as the market is back to Dec 2019 levels by then, we will be in good shape. That is when we hit our minimum number and we will keep investing through this. If the market hasn't recovered in two years, I am not sure that retirement will be our biggest concern.

vand

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #141 on: March 18, 2020, 02:30:58 PM »
What is different for me from 2008, and is bothering me, is that fact that I feel powerless in front of the market gyrations right now. In 2008, I had < $100k in the market and any market losses were significantly made up by the new money I was shoveling in.

Now, the magnitude of these losses are so large that I feel powerless to do anything about it.

That feels - difficult!

Iíve noticed the same difference myself and it has made me think about ideas for an AA that adjusts based on a stash/income or stash/stashing ratio. When my stash was 2 years of savings my income was a lot more like a bond allocation that allowed me to buy stocks while they were on sale. If the market drops 50% I just double the shares I own in a single year. Now that the stash is many times what I can save in a year that doesnít work as well. Iím still confident the long term average will be fine but Iím definitely glad weíre not selling now to fund our cost of living.

Right. And this is totally logical.

If you stash is still in its infancy and you can easily replace any drop in its value from just a few monthly buys then it makes total sense to be aggresssive.

But if your stash has been built up over years and greatly exceeds your income, a drop in value is a direct drop in your net worth that can't easily be replaced, so it makes much sense to be more cautious.

Remember that emotionally drops hurt more than gains make you feel good, something like x2.5. This is hard-wired into our survival instinct. It makes total sense that you want to prioritize protecting a large portfolio rather positioning it for maximum future gains.

This is only logical if you are near retirement and subject to SORR, in which case you probably should have adjusted your asset allocation before then, or at least had a plan in place and know that you are taking a calculated risk and might need to work longer.  If you aren't recently retired, or planning to retire soon, then I don't see how it makes a difference or why you need to "protect" your portfolio.  I'm probably 5+ years away from retirement, and I'm 100% stocks, and I probably "lost" $150k in the last month.  The flip side of that is that some of the past years I was making more in market gains than I was able to contribute.  I don't need any of this money until I retire so I am willing to take that risk of being temporarily down a huge amount now in order to be permanently up a huge amount in the long run.

And this is only logical if you are 100% convinced that stocks will recover by the time you are hoping to sell. There are examples in history where people have died waiting for the turnaround that never came.


The point is that we buy whatever we do because we believe ultimately that it will be worth more in the future.

When the market goes up in a short period of time it reaffirms our belief, even if we are only riding the right side of short term volatility.

When the market goes against you it challenges that belief; the more it goes against you the more and more it challenges your belief and you start to question everything you thought you knew about markets and investing. That is very understandably human nature.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2020, 02:32:40 PM by vand »

vand

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #142 on: March 27, 2020, 03:29:30 AM »
On a time weighted basis I was down about -21% at the very nadir, but the bounce this week has recovered a lot of those losses since, and now sitting at -11%.

On a money weighted basis I've been able to shove some more money in, so down about -8%


Michael in ABQ

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #143 on: March 27, 2020, 07:04:31 AM »
From peak in mid-February to (the current) bottom paper losses were about $25k. In the last few days recovered about $5k so down about $20k total. However, I'm still ahead of where I was a year ago due to increasing my contributions up to 25% from about 10% last year.

hodedofome

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #144 on: March 27, 2020, 12:54:34 PM »
My trading account went from $112k to start the year, up to $150k middle of February, and hit a low of $79k early this week before bouncing with the rest of the market.

ChpBstrd

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #145 on: March 27, 2020, 02:31:11 PM »
One mortgage, plus one new Honda civic, plus the new mountain bike I was drooling over before this whole situation.

wienerdog

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #146 on: March 27, 2020, 03:32:12 PM »
With today's market close my NW is 91.5% of where I was when the spreadsheet was last updated March 1st.  Still got a couple more days before anything gets put on paper and I make another contribution at the end of the month.  Anything in between is just a memory that will soon go bye bye.

johndoe

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #147 on: March 28, 2020, 09:18:54 AM »
I like dorking out with Personal Capital during things like this; I'm surprised so many of you with higher N.W. than me (and more on the line) don't track things closer.  Well apparently I've beaten "US Stock" since Valentine's Day of this year and last, WoOhOo!

I also find it funny to read back through this thread/whole board and see the tone change in ~month.  (I'm not trying to say any one user has done an about face, just in general)
« Last Edit: March 28, 2020, 09:25:57 AM by johndoe »

Jack0Life

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #148 on: March 29, 2020, 09:44:41 AM »
My investments are down ~$30k (~20%).  My net worth is down ~10%.  I'm shocked how well the average person on here takes this considering how carefully we squirrel away funds.  Seeing two years' worth of expenses vaporize in a matter of days is very frustrating and I have a hard time believing people are so willing to accept it.  I can wrap my head around "ok NOW the assets are on 'sale'" so continue buying, but if that's the analogy then I was overpaying for the last 3 YEARS.

I will leave 401k contributions untouched but have tinkered with my taxable account.  I know nothing about this stuff, but boy it's hard to stand on the train tracks when you hear the whistle.  I started reading /r/wallstreetbets as a joke, but I'll be damned if they weren't right about this virus!

I'm with you on your perception.
This was a freight train coming and you stood on the track hoping it would stop.
People downplayed it saying its on a loss on paper but it will take 2-4 yrs(maybe ?) to get back to what it was so you lost yourself that much time.  Its a LOSS on matter how you look at it.
Some also mention that its like going back in time and being able to buy stocks at a discount. YEAH, its great to buy stocks at a discount but you still have a current portfolio that just took a 10=30% loss.

Jack0Life

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Re: What are your correction "losses"
« Reply #149 on: March 29, 2020, 09:46:06 AM »
My wife and I were thiiiiiiis close to hitting $1MM total net worth (including everything, home equity, 529s, etc). I think we got to $990k and change before the crashes started. Now we're at $788k, so we have lost about $200k. It hurts for sure, but I am looking on the bright sides, clearing out old investments that are now at a loss and harvesting capital losses. In addition to buying at a discount.

Awe man, I was right with you. We were sitting on $992k waiting to celebrate being Millionaires but it wasn't meant to be.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2020, 11:34:33 AM by Jack0Life »