Author Topic: Project Charity  (Read 3622 times)

mrpercentage

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Project Charity
« on: April 23, 2015, 09:27:40 PM »
I know charity can be a big deal on taxes. Hopefully, its not the only reason you give charity. Im going to do some charity this year but Im going to put a special spin to it. It seems to me that a lot of the charity money I give returns in calendars and "free mailing address stickers" that I never use. Im mean who does.

This year Im going to take some of that money and choose a company that deserves to be here. This will not be based on price or profits. I will purchase their stock and refuse to sell it for any reason--- unless they lose that special something that I think adds to this world. I will take whatever dividends they may produce and reserve it for their stock indefinitely.

Ideas of a special something.
1. They give more to charity than anyone else in their sector.
2. They make the world a safer place, keeping it green, cleaning up waste, ect.
3. They add something of great value that improves the lives of many.

seattlecyclone

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Re: Project Charity
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2015, 11:00:51 PM »
Even if a company is performing 100% altruistic activities, how do you equate ownership of their stock to a charitable contribution? Purchasing stock on the secondary market does not cause the underlying company to have one extra cent in its bank account.

mrpercentage

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Re: Project Charity
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2015, 01:16:10 AM »
i told you I was going to stay up late the get my iPhone. Correct me on this please. If company get nothing from being public why go public? Do they pay dividends for Monopoly money?

mrpercentage

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Re: Project Charity
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2015, 01:37:10 AM »
I suppose my fallacy involves ownership in correlation with effecting change. I know they don't get paid for demand but I will leave the post up the same so someone can learn from it

seattlecyclone

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Re: Project Charity
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2015, 09:01:44 AM »
A company gets money during an IPO or later public offering. Subsequent trades of those shares don't affect the company one bit. This is also why divesting from companies you dislike is a dubious strategy for effecting change in those companies.

Rmt

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Re: Project Charity
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2015, 02:07:45 AM »
mr %,

I suggest you look into a few charities that applies 100% of donations toward DIRECT PROJECTS while their G&A staffs' costs are covered by angels or other groups.
It is the best way to help support charitable activities I know.

trailrated

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Re: Project Charity
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2015, 07:01:25 PM »
I was trying to find info on the website to see how much goes directly toward "the cause" but can't find anything. Anyone know where to look? http://chivecharities.org

OneCoolCat

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Re: Project Charity
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2015, 07:28:40 PM »
I don't think this actually serves a charitable purpose at all.  The IRS will certainly concur.

arebelspy

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Re: Project Charity
« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2015, 10:12:03 AM »
If company get nothing from being public why go public?

For the founders to cash out.

But if company X is already public, and I own a share of it, and you buy that share from me (for whatever amount), how does that help company X, or get them any money?
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stepitup

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Re: Project Charity
« Reply #9 on: April 29, 2015, 09:24:25 PM »
This makes me think of organizations like kiva where you can provide investment loans to small businesses. Or I know my church denomination has a fund they call Transformational Investing where they invest in companies in Israel/Palestine that are focused on projects that promote peace and education. Although both of those are run through donations and once you put the money in you can't get it out.

However, I wonder if there are funds that you could purchase shares in that might fall under transformational or positive investing. Or maybe the key to your strategy is buying a company that is at the start-up stage rather than a long established one.

innerscorecard

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Re: Project Charity
« Reply #10 on: April 29, 2015, 10:28:24 PM »
If company get nothing from being public why go public?

For the founders to cash out.

But if company X is already public, and I own a share of it, and you buy that share from me (for whatever amount), how does that help company X, or get them any money?

If the company's stock is more highly valued, that company can more easily engage in transactions in which it uses the value of company stock as currency, such as acquisitions paid for in part or in full by stock.

Insiders at the company (which is a distinct from the company itself, but this is relevant) will also be rewarded as their ownership shares in the company are worth more.