Author Topic: any websites to compare the history of stock data?  (Read 2624 times)

dess1313

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any websites to compare the history of stock data?
« on: February 17, 2016, 11:33:30 PM »
I have been fooling around with google finance, but finding it hard to look at historical data to try and understand some of the principles of investing.  I hear a lot about how dividend payments being so lucrative. 

Is there a site i could enter in data and see the previous trends and dividend payments for certain stocks?  I know historical data is just history, but i am trying to better understand what i am getting myself into.   I like to see how numbers change and grow in an effort to understand more about what i could be doing.  I've been reading the Canadian couch potato, MMM, the bogglehead books and the millionaire teacher.  Thanks.

Interest Compound

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Re: any websites to compare the history of stock data?
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2016, 11:59:12 PM »
I have been fooling around with google finance, but finding it hard to look at historical data to try and understand some of the principles of investing.  I hear a lot about how dividend payments being so lucrative. 

Is there a site i could enter in data and see the previous trends and dividend payments for certain stocks?  I know historical data is just history, but i am trying to better understand what i am getting myself into.   I like to see how numbers change and grow in an effort to understand more about what i could be doing.  I've been reading the Canadian couch potato, MMM, the bogglehead books and the millionaire teacher.  Thanks.

I'm not aware of any resources that follow dividend payments for specific stocks going back very far. But I can link to an amazing post by walkworks that I think answers your question:

-------------------------------

This just shows that the author doesn't understand (or isn't explaining) exponential functions well. Think of it this way:
-If I have a stock that I hold for 100 years that appreciates 1% per year and pays no dividends, after 100 years, I've got $270.
-If I have a stock that I hold for 100 years that appreciates zero, and pays 1% dividends (which I reinvest) and we assume no taxation on those dividends, I also have $270.
-If my stock both appreciates 1% and pays 1% (reinvested) dividends, I have $724.

Now, in that scenario, I would never say that *either* the capital gains or the dividend is mostly responsible for the extra gains, right? In fact, a rational person would say that both are responsible for 50% of the gains.

Let's look at another scenario.
-Capital gains @6% and no dividends. My $100 is now $33,930.
-Dividends @4% and no capital gains. My $100 is $5,050.
-Both added together (as the Bogle example) for a total of 10%/year. $100 becomes $1,378,000!

Now stop for a minute and think. When I added in the dividends, I suddenly had way more money! 97.5% of my gains came because I reinvested them! Dividends are awesome!

BUT - you could just spin it the other way and say that the capital gains accounted for 99.6% of the gains when you start from the default state of an only-dividend scenario.

The point is this: assessing your gains in the way that you are doing it is insane. If you are getting 6% from capital gains and 4% from dividends, then 60% of your gains are capital gains. Period. Otherwise over any long time scale, adding in ANY RANDOM FACTOR that boosts the investment yield will "account for" most of your profit.

That's just how exponents work. I could add in a special "magic investor bonus" of 1% on top of that 10% and it would "account for" most of my gains over that time period (in fact, my 1% magic-factor raises my total to a cool $3.4 million - the vast majority of my gains!)

The point is that you should put money in when you can, not that dividends are the majority of the gains of the market.

-W

http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/investor-alley/understanding-dividends-strategies/msg476335/#msg476335

dess1313

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Re: any websites to compare the history of stock data?
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2016, 12:24:14 AM »
Thanks IC.  i will read further there

I come from a family that does not invest, and at one time savings paid out enough that it was not a bad vehicle to use to gain.  that was years ago of course.  I had tried doing the investor guided route and got burned in 2011/2012.  looking back yes i made a LOT of mistakes which i'm trying to fix now.   I'm very leery of the whole market, but after lots of reading I have started a tangerine account recommended by CCC.  I've been looking at the histories and now seems to be another rough time market wise.  I was just surprised to see how some mention sometimes thousands are paid out yearly in dividends.  i never thought some of the payouts could be that high.  I thought if i could see a few what if scenarios it would help me understand more

Heckler

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Re: any websites to compare the history of stock data?
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2016, 07:28:48 AM »
Morningstar might be what you're looking for. 

http://www2.morningstar.ca/homepage/h_ca.aspx?culture=en-CA
« Last Edit: February 18, 2016, 07:31:09 AM by Heckler »

Heckler

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Re: any websites to compare the history of stock data?
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2016, 07:36:37 AM »
Also dig around in whatever you plan to invest in, and understand it. 

For example.

https://www.tangerine.ca/forwardthinking/investing/mutual-funds-distributions-explained


dess1313

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Re: any websites to compare the history of stock data?
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2016, 05:05:53 PM »
I have been digging around and i am understanding it thanks a lot to the books i had read.  I just find it more risky than savings/GICs i have been used to so i'm moving into it slowly.  I was wanting to see what would have happened if i had started investing say 5 years ago even with the roller coaster years and where i could be now.  maybe the fund is only up 2 or 3% some years but if the dividends paid out well then it wouldn't be a terrible year in the end.  I am looking at morningstar right now and that i think is yes what i was thinking of.  thanks heckler. 

mrpercentage

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Re: any websites to compare the history of stock data?
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2016, 06:20:30 PM »
https://www.portfoliovisualizer.com/backtest-portfolio

it has its flaws, select the years you want to start at and finish, select periodic adjustment monthly, select display income yes, then put in your tick and do 100%

MustacheAndaHalf

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Re: any websites to compare the history of stock data?
« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2016, 07:44:19 PM »
While PortfolioVisualizer lacks an entry for "high dividend stocks", it has all kinds of more important variety like US small value, US large growth, gold, total bond market, treasuries, etc.  Even if you come up with the perfect strategy for the past 17.234 years, it's more balanced if you try scenarios at different start and end dates.

I sometimes see the dividend payments marked in Google Finance for specific stocks.  If you want the amount of the dividend (but not the percentage), morningstar shows a very limited view of distributions:
http://etfs.morningstar.com/distribution?t=VTI&region=usa&culture=en-US
But their "performance" page is probably more useful.  Like Google Finance, it lets you compare performance to benchmarks or other funds.

dess1313

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Re: any websites to compare the history of stock data?
« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2016, 08:41:05 PM »
thanks MR% and Mustacheandahalf

i finally realized i could see the dividends in google if i only look at a single stock.  I usually looked at a few in comparison together and wouldn't see it.

I will continue my reading and keep up my small contributions!  thanks everyone