Author Topic: How do you compare brokers/investment agencies?  (Read 1806 times)

d3t3rm1n3d

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How do you compare brokers/investment agencies?
« on: November 15, 2013, 11:24:10 AM »
I recently began a new job that mandates 6% retirement investing, deducted from your paycheck.  They authorize Fidelity, Lincoln Financial, VALIC and TIAA-CREF as carriers that we can choose from.  How do I compare them against one another?  My husband has an IRA, so we were thinking of becoming more invested (literally), actively managing our savings and going the mutual fund route.  I am 23, he is 25, so retirement is is about half a century away for us.  Are mutual funds appropriate for this situation? We have an investment property that currently generates a small amount of income for us each month, too.  Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

Louisville

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Re: How do you compare brokers/investment agencies?
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2013, 02:29:10 PM »
...I am 23, he is 25, so retirement is is about half a century away for us.  ...

This isn't what you asked about, but I must point out that one of the basic tenets of the MMM philosophy is that you can retire a hell of a lot earlier than age 65. Read some more of the blog posts.

dadof4

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Re: How do you compare brokers/investment agencies?
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2013, 05:33:11 PM »
Is this an IRA or a 401k?

CDP45

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Re: How do you compare brokers/investment agencies?
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2013, 06:43:01 PM »
Take a look at the fees they charge, there is a mandatory disclosure statement made, get a hold of that document. Also ease of business/how well their website works might be a small factor.

PantsOnFire

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Re: How do you compare brokers/investment agencies?
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2013, 11:37:57 AM »
...I am 23, he is 25, so retirement is is about half a century away for us.  ...

This isn't what you asked about, but I must point out that one of the basic tenets of the MMM philosophy is that you can retire a hell of a lot earlier than age 65. Read some more of the blog posts.
Yeah, try a quarter century or so, if you make it a priority!