Author Topic: Alternative Investing Platforms (YieldStreet, Cadre, AngelList, etc)  (Read 522 times)

marcusqueen2011

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does anyone here invest on any of these alternative platforms? Seems like a lot of buzz around them - not sure how real they are. Would love some real feedback.

brellis1vt

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Re: Alternative Investing Platforms (YieldStreet, Cadre, AngelList, etc)
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2019, 07:14:41 PM »
I'm currently trying yieldstreet and peerstreet.  So far so good with yieldstreet but I haven't invested with them long enough to recommend it.  Plus they only have limited opportunities and I am looking for things that are recession resistant.  I would not recommend peerstreet.  At first it was good because you could setup automatic investments for high yield loans.  Now the system won't let you do that and they rarely have returns higher than 8% (used to get 10-12%). I also have had a loan default and they haven't communicated the plan well.  I am pulling all my money out of it as soon as possible.

agoraphone

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Re: Alternative Investing Platforms (YieldStreet, Cadre, AngelList, etc)
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2019, 06:51:33 AM »
MRMM has a post on Peer Street: http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2016/05/02/peerstreet/

I've been using it for a couple months now - so far so good. $1,000 minimum and auto investing makes diversification easy and lowers your risk. I'm earning around 8%, which is not as good as it was when the platform first launched, but still better than many other asset classes.

I'd love to hear some folks' impressions of YieldStreet.

HeadedWest2029

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Re: Alternative Investing Platforms (YieldStreet, Cadre, AngelList, etc)
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2019, 07:34:37 AM »
I've been interested off and on with these investment vehicles.  At least with something like Peerstreet you have a first lien position when things go south.  Not sure on YieldStreet.  For peer-to-peer lending like Lending Club, Prosper, forget about it.  In general I feel like the glory days (if there were glory days) are over.  Across the board it seems like returns have drifted lower, institutional money started getting involved.  Taxes are more complicated and less tax efficient.  Oh, and the hidden cost of cash drag.  There's often a delay between getting cash returned and reinvested.  I read something the other day that despite private equity getting superior returns to public markets, when you factor in cash drag (the time between raising capital and deploying the money) the returns a pretty pedestrian (like ~6%).  I've experienced similar drag in these types of investments.  TLDR - I'm not sure the juice is worth the squeeze