Author Topic: Planting and growing your own 2024  (Read 15357 times)

Telecaster

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3719
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #150 on: May 20, 2024, 05:19:02 PM »
In addition to my raised beds, I'm experimenting with grow bags this year.   I have 19 (soon to be 20) 10-gallon grow bags.  I mixed up all the soil myself from regular soil, compost, coco coir, and pearlite.   It was a fair amount of work to get all that together, but everything is planted and ready to go.   

I've got garlic and saffron crocus that are coming along from last fall.  And I've planted chard, kale, bok choy, peas, mustard greens, radishes, a couple kinds of lettuce, marigolds, and carrots from seeds.  Then I've also planted a couple kinds of squash, tomatoes, jalapeŮos, Fresnos, poblanos, and shishitos from starts.   In times past, I've had a pretty good herb garden, but I've let it wane in the last few years.  But I've determined to make a comeback.  I have legacy majoram, oregano (lots), rosemary, rosemary, and thyme.  New this year (but not to me) is sage, tarragon and salad burnet.  Any other herbs I should consider?


lhamo

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3293
  • Location: Seattle
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #151 on: May 20, 2024, 06:54:10 PM »
If you want some mint I have lots of different varieties (chocolate, orange and strawberry are all fun)-- you do want to keep them in containers, though, or they will take over your yard! 

Thyme is another one that comes in lots of different "flavors" -- I have lemon and lime thyme, both purchased from the Tilth plant sale over the years.

I've also got quite a few lemon balm plants that have volunteered all over my p patch plot.  Also in the mint family so you want to keep it under control.




ItsALongStory

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 538
  • Location: Somewhere in Europe
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #152 on: May 20, 2024, 10:21:05 PM »
The variety of crops you're all growing is impressive, we do have some herbs in small pots but lack a bit of variety so perhaps rather than trying to start veggies from seed I should just focus on herbs and flowers as well. This was the first winter where I tried to grow more stuff from seed, bought myself a heating mat which worked well for very early seed germination. I should probably keep using it because it really made a huge difference in those first few days.

In our yard we currently have:
- Tomatoes and bellpeppers that are starting to flower
- Peas coming up, only got about 50% germination I'd say but our cats have a lot to do with that
- Strawberries on a near daily basis, due to slugs I need to harvest them prior to prime ripeness
- As far as fruit we have very small crops of currant, pears (literally 2), plums, raspberry and thornless blackberry coming in slowly. Persimmons have done super well and might need to be monitored so the heavy fruits won't be causing branches to break off.

On my olive grove there are wild varieties of mint (which, it turns out, the chickens don't like), a lot of blackberry, crabapple, walnut and two relatively well producing Mirabelle plum trees. I'm hoping to add more trees this year from my airprune bed experiment.

The airprune experiment involves growing a ton of tree seeds in a sandy seedling medium over winter. In my specific case I grew them in an old tire which was placed off the ground. This ensures that the taproot does not develop (it gets auto pruned when the root grows into the air pocket underneath the bed) so the plant puts all of its energy into lateral roots. This will result in a more elaborate root system that in theory should be more suitable for replanting these trees. I made the mistake of simply mixing up a lot of seeds rather than dedicating beds to individual species. This means that I will now be forced to repot all trees at once even if some are less developed than others. Most of the seedlings are currently about 12-16 inches tall.

Frugal Lizard

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4679
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Southwest Ontario
  • One foot in front of the other....
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #153 on: May 27, 2024, 10:07:47 AM »
Another good week for the garden or should say, gardens.

In town, the greenhouse is now fully planted out. (hot peppers and cherry tomatoes) Three more beds to fill in the kitchen garden. (Tomatillos, groundcherries, sweet peppers, cukes, beans, herbs, eggplants and beets)

Pantry garden is getting under control but lots of planting still to do. The soil is beautiful this year. I have been super careful about compaction and working when it is wet.

Lots of peas are up and for a first: an excellent germination rate for carrots. I have struggled with carrots. I thought I had failed again because I planted them with the same planting depth as peas, by forgetting to adjust the seeder. But turns out: carrots don't mind being planted as deep as the seeder was set. And the beauty of the jang seeder is the spacing. No need to thin them.

Seedlings planted:
All the leeks, fancy onions, pumpkins and summer squash.
Some of the winter squash: butternut, Guatemalan blue, burgess buttercup, honeynut, delicata
Bed prep for the rest of the three sisters

DH helped me install the cattle panels in the tomato bed and we started weeding it.
I have been moving the plastic sheeting around so that the weeds are a little weaker when I get time to tackle them.

Note to self: DO NOT LEAVE THE BEDS UNCOVERED ALL WINTER.

I can collect enough kale seed to sow a winter cover crop in kale. And that would be better than the huge dandelions that I am dealing with this spring.

Still to plant: slicer and paste tomatoes, sweet potatoes, melons, pickling cukes, beans (great canadian, blue jay, thibodeau du compte beace, black, rodcor, maxibel, provider, orca) celery, beets, more carrots and the potato potatoes.

I am going to be able to donate two flats of eggplants, half a flat of leeks / onions, zukes/summer squash, 36 tomato plants at least. I may run out of room and have more to give away.

ItsALongStory

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 538
  • Location: Somewhere in Europe
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #154 on: June 04, 2024, 11:14:55 PM »
Sounds like a proper farm, how do you approach interplanting with so many varieties going in? Would you mind sharing a picture of your trellis solution? I have some cattle panels laying around that could be suitable for my tomatoes as well.

I decided to replant some of the trees early, might end up being a mistake but I was willing to give it a shot with about 30% of the seedlings. The pots are currently sitting on the ground so I need to raise them up and ensure continued growth of lateral roots.

Also picked up two mulberry trees (one white, one black) but didn't pay close enough attention as they are labeled 'astringent'. Their primary function will be to feed some of our chickens, provide shade and fall leaves though so still plenty of benefits from them.

Our chickens are doing well, laying on average 7 eggs per day now (from 10 egg layers). One lays an egg that is very weak so I'll experiment with adding some calcium through reinserting their dehydrated shells as a powder to the feed. I moved them yesterday and they were already well on their way to scratch around and find bugs and worms. One unexpected benefit has been a reduction in flies in their area. I figured we'd see higher concentrations due to the manure but it's been the total opposite actually.

mspym

  • Senior Mustachian
  • ********
  • Posts: 10001
  • Location: Aotearoa
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #155 on: June 05, 2024, 12:10:00 AM »
We are back after nearly 4 weeks away and the garden has survived despite all the neglect and frosts. We also had a huge dump of leaves from the elms so now some more light is getting through. We raked all the leaves to the new bed we're building up. I also went through the chard and cut off any of the really sad leaves so hopefully there's better airflow for the remaining plants.

THRIVING - mostly leaves
- silverbeet/chard
- coriander/cilantro
- three broad beans
- perpetual spinach
- broccoli rabe
- mystery lettuces
- mustard greens that are mostly there as green mulch.

STRUGGLING
- 2 out of the 6 'mixed brassica' seedlings have been devoured by caterpillars
- mizuna seedlings
- lemon tree
- maybe the leeks and shallots, but we will see how they go and if they fatten up
 
DEAD
- all the peppers (they froze)
- half the strawberry runners
- some of the herbs

Frugal Lizard

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4679
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Southwest Ontario
  • One foot in front of the other....
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #156 on: June 05, 2024, 10:46:16 AM »
Another full gardening weekend.

I had both Saturday morning and Sunday morning dedicated to the community garden at my church. Saturday was prepping all the beds (very very late) for Sunday morning planting of the seedlings as part of the all ages active worship service. Three flats of seedlings got planted out and are no longer my biggest worry. I used seed from the previous year so had almost no extras. I should just plant extras because the population that relies on this produce exceeds the harvest. This is in the back of my mind with every rodent in my neighbourhood clamoring to damage the seedlings.

I am contemplating constructing a temporary metal fabric structure twice the size of my cold frame that I could secure the flats in for the three weeks just prior to planting out. It needs to be full sun, and ideally sturdy enough to throw covers over for those borderline nights. It would be great if it kept out all the chipmunks, didn't trap butterflies and was exposed to wind and rain to allow for sturdier seedlings.

oldtoyota

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3206
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #157 on: June 19, 2024, 07:24:20 AM »
I was looking at the 2023 thread and concerns about seed saving.

So, I wanted to share this link to the Living Seed Company. I appreciate their heirloom seeds.

https://www.livingseedcompany.com/

@oldtoyota - thanks, I ordered six seed packets. Not a huge selection but it appears to be well-curated and selective.
One can never go wrong with heirloom/organic seeds:).

That's wonderful! Thank you for tagging me. The owners of that business seem nice, and I like what the good they're doing.

mspym

  • Senior Mustachian
  • ********
  • Posts: 10001
  • Location: Aotearoa
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #158 on: June 19, 2024, 01:47:24 PM »
I am now the owner of two rhubarb plants and a curry leaf tree, which I should get into the ground in the next few days, which may spur the construction of a fourth garden bed. I also have learned the hard way about feeding lemon trees especially in sandy soil.

The garlic I planted a month ago from supermarket cloves are all sprouting and we harvested some lettuce and greens for last nightís dinner. Today Iíll use some silverbeet for a galette. Out of all the vegetables, the silverbeet and tomatoes really have had the greatest ROI so far.

Frugal Lizard

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4679
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Southwest Ontario
  • One foot in front of the other....
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #159 on: June 24, 2024, 10:20:47 AM »
My gardens are coming along.
Harvesting snow and snap peas this week.

We have had over 4.5inches of rain in the last 8 days. Onions and garlic are not happy. All the melons and squash are delighted.

Planted popcorn yesterday among the squash plants. When they are up I will add a few cranberry beans around them to complete the replica 3-Sisters.

The tomatoes outdoors are not happy but inside the greenhouse? They are extremely happy.

Raenia

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2723
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #160 on: June 24, 2024, 10:51:57 AM »
Not having a good year for the garden so far. The deer have struck again, taking the tops off all my tomatoes for the [second time[/i] this season, including pulling one entirely out of the ground. No flowers on any of them, as they try to recover.

Lettuces are also growing very slowly, they're not enjoying the heat at all.

Linea_Norway

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8605
  • Location: Norway
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #161 on: June 29, 2024, 08:40:31 AM »
I am now the owner of two rhubarb plants and a curry leaf tree, which I should get into the ground in the next few days, which may spur the construction of a fourth garden bed. I also have learned the hard way about feeding lemon trees especially in sandy soil.
<snip>

@mspym
Just curious. Is a curry leave tree the same as a kaffir lime? Or is it a curry tree?

Linea_Norway

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8605
  • Location: Norway
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #162 on: June 29, 2024, 09:10:29 AM »
Yesterday I came home from a one and a half week vacation (away from home). All the potted big tomatoes, bell peppers and small pots with herbs outside were a disaster. All perished because of the draught. The peppers were placed just outside the roof so that any rain should have fallen on them. But obviously very little rain reached them. Some of the bell peppers had a large brown spot on them. I had to cut away the rot and save the otherwise still green pepper. Of the herbs, the basil is recovering. Of tye large tomatoes, we had to throw away one with a lot of brown rot. And there are two tomatoes with a little rot. The rest of the fruits look okay, just tye leaves of the plant are in a sad condition. And the tomatoes might develop catface later.

The plants inside the house, micro bush tomatoes and chili peppers did slightly better. Some of the tomatoes have shriveled leaves, but the plants were at least full of ripe or at least coloured tomatoes. I pick the coloured to let them ripen in a bowl. A few or the chillies are getting red.

Some of the potatoes are flowering. I have learned that you can harvest potatoes two weeks after the flowers (or was it the greenery) perish.

I harvested quite a few leaves of the kale and palm kale. Some creature had bitten small holes into the leaves, but it was not that bad. The kohlrabi is pretty big, but should be a little bigger to be harvested. I also picked many leaves from the chards, which are now finally growing big.

The beans which are not functioning very well, still had a plant with quite a few bean pids on them. That was Norwegian Brown, which is spupposed to be a bean to be dried. But I pucked a lot of green pods. The small sugar pea plants had created quite a few sugar peas.

The squashes all had female fruits with a perished flower on them. I doubt that some pollinator pollinated them. I cut open some of the old male flowers, and tried to still fertilize a cut open old female flower. All plants have new fruit shoots, still. I have heard so many stories of people who have so many squashes that they need to give them away. I have never had enough. I even bought F1 seeds for a green squash in the hope that it would be more productive than my previous squash plant. I now have 3 pumpkins in the garden, 2 squash plant as well as a squash and a pumpkin on the balcony in a pot. So far, I harvested two squashes. And 2 pumpkins are in progress, one Blue Hubbard and one Hokkaido.

I also harvested some more Allium fistulosum, which is a very productive plant. The new rubarbs (from seed this year) are also growing big.

DH picked a portion of strawberries. All plants are making new shoots, so we should have more new plants next year. Something went terribly wrong with the bareroot plants we got this year. At least half of the 20 dies before we planted them out. Maybe because we didn't water them enough when they were waiting in pots?? At least those that survived are looking good now.

Today I harvested quite a shitload of carrots. I was still just thinning what I had sown into a milk carton. Today quite a lot of them were a nice size. And there are still plenty of smaller ones that can grow bigger. I also harvested the last radishes which were about to flower. Not sure they are still good to eat. Next year I will not sow them so close to the potatoes.

The artischoke that I planted out earliest has one big flower bud, which can soon be harvested. And a new bud to come. The other artischoke that I kept in a small pot for too long is also growing well.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2024, 09:14:58 AM by Linea_Norway »

mspym

  • Senior Mustachian
  • ********
  • Posts: 10001
  • Location: Aotearoa
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #163 on: June 29, 2024, 01:26:17 PM »
@Linea_Norway the curry tree is very different from the makrut lime - its leaves are used widely in Indian cooking where you fry them up with onions and spices in the first stage of cooking. I donít think it gives a fruit like the limes do.

Yesterday we popped down to the local small plant shop and I got a blackboy peach tree and a dwarf nectarine tree which should nearly complete our fruit tree collection. Iíd still like to get a dwarf NZ grapefruit but they are currently a bit hard to source. So assuming everything lives (a big ask) weíll have white peach; black peach; golden nectarines; Meyer lemons; fingerlimes; blueberries and rhubarb. We also got a dwarf cherry manuka, a grevillea and a muelenbeckia shrub to fill some spaces. The ongoing work of planting the roots of all the spring onions we buy is starting to yield new onions.

Telecaster

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3719
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #164 on: July 01, 2024, 03:58:57 PM »
Yesterday I came home from a one and a half week vacation (away from home). All the potted big tomatoes, bell peppers and small pots with herbs outside were a disaster. All perished because of the draught. The peppers were placed just outside the roof so that any rain should have fallen on them. But obviously very little rain reached them.

Sorry to hear that!   Here in the Pacific Northwest in springtime, lack of rainfall is not much of a problem.  However, this year I'm experimenting with ollas in an attempt to even out my watering a little bit.  Jury is still out, but thus far they seem to help.   You might want to consider something like that for vacations.

Linea_Norway

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8605
  • Location: Norway
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #165 on: July 02, 2024, 02:25:17 AM »
Yesterday I came home from a one and a half week vacation (away from home). All the potted big tomatoes, bell peppers and small pots with herbs outside were a disaster. All perished because of the draught. The peppers were placed just outside the roof so that any rain should have fallen on them. But obviously very little rain reached them.

Sorry to hear that!   Here in the Pacific Northwest in springtime, lack of rainfall is not much of a problem.  However, this year I'm experimenting with ollas in an attempt to even out my watering a little bit.  Jury is still out, but thus far they seem to help.   You might want to consider something like that for vacations.

Ollas are a bit big for those pots. But I have once purchased stone tops that you can screw on a large coke bottle and put upside down into a pot. First time I tried, two years ago, it emptied very fast. But maybe because the top wasn't soaked and the soil wasn't wet to start with. I will try to use them next vacation. I should just remember to save empty coke bottles that I seldom use.

One other issue is that many of my pots have holes in the bottom or on the side, so that I can put them outside. But I have noticed that a lot of water just runs out immediately when watering. Maybe I should start over with new pots without holes. I can get them for free at the grocery store.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2024, 02:08:15 PM by Linea_Norway »

Frugal Lizard

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4679
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Southwest Ontario
  • One foot in front of the other....
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #166 on: July 02, 2024, 05:28:13 AM »
You have to have the holes. Could you try a shallow plate under the pot that can't hold too much water? And if you are planning to be away often, using a growing medium with moisture retention components might help. Most soil mixes tend to be higher porosity for seed starting. 

In my experience my pots need daily watering becauseIam too cheap for the expensive potting soil for baskets.  I can stretch watering for inground plants with mulch but if it's hot and windy, then all bets are off.

You could sink your pots into the soil so they don't dry out as quickly. My daughter made a lot if pocket money watering the various pots around the neighborhood for the folks who had buckets of herbs and flowers around their patios.

lhamo

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3293
  • Location: Seattle
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #167 on: July 02, 2024, 05:50:51 AM »
What I've been doing for some of my indoor plants (that seems to work) is to pot the plant in a plastic nursery pot with holes, and then set that pot into a fancier plant pot without holes.  For some of them I put a layer of these little round clay things I got from Ikea at the bottom of the outer pot to ensure that the plants are not sitting in standing water.  I've gotten lots of good root growth down into those clay ball layers, so I guess the plants like it?

Telecaster

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3719
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #168 on: July 03, 2024, 01:35:02 PM »
One other issue is that many of my pots have holes in the bottom or on the side, so tha5 I can put them outside. But I have noticed that a lot of water just runs out immediately when watering. Maybe I should start over with new pots without holes. I can get them for free at the grocery store.


You definitely want holes in the bottom.  Otherwise the water won't drain and you can get root rot.   

The rest of this might not apply, but one possible reason the water can run out immediately is that the pot is too small and there simply isn't enough soil in the pot to retain water.  Possibly an indication the plants are rootbound.   

I've had good success using cloth grow bags for many of my containers.  One advantage of grow bags is air pruning of the roots, that is the roots tips die when they get exposed to oxygen near the edge of the bag.   This prevents the plants from getting root bound.  Grow bags are also easier to move.  They do require more water, however.   Again, I don't know if that applies to you, but I thought I would throw that out there.






Linea_Norway

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8605
  • Location: Norway
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #169 on: July 03, 2024, 02:14:05 PM »
Thank you all.

I know that pots need holes normally, but we have a large roofed terrace. On that, I had three fancy pots without holes for my chili peppers. Those are not getting any rain. All other pots have holes and are standing outside the roof. Except for the big tomatoes that don't like to get rained on.

I have taken the micro bush tomatoes inside my house on a shallow disk, because birds were stealing green tomatoes. Inside I could just as well have a closed pot.

tygertygertyger

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 829
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #170 on: July 03, 2024, 02:20:58 PM »
It has been so hot and humid outside over the last couple of weeks. Miserable!

Our blueberries on on their third wave of ripening, which is interesting... the ripening started two weeks earlier than last year, but is still going with new berries just starting to turn now.

Tomatoes are loving life. I planted potatoes much earlier than usual this year, so half of them are ready to be harvested. But it keeps raining just enough to put me off doing it... maybe over the weekend.

I had a minor flipout about invasives. I had hand-pulled so, so many invasives (before they could flower/berry) in the last month, before realizing that I needed to be carefully digging out every bit of root. Going back now to the same areas and digging up any roots that I find.

The area that I'm currently working in has no other plants (shady, woodchipped), but there are a lot of other areas with fully established plants intermixed with invasives that I don't know how to tease out the bad root systems without messing everything up. Any tips??

It's times like this that I remind myself to be grateful we didn't get the extra large yard that we wanted...

Linea_Norway

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8605
  • Location: Norway
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #171 on: July 04, 2024, 07:12:54 AM »
It has been so hot and humid outside over the last couple of weeks. Miserable!

Our blueberries on on their third wave of ripening, which is interesting... the ripening started two weeks earlier than last year, but is still going with new berries just starting to turn now.

Tomatoes are loving life. I planted potatoes much earlier than usual this year, so half of them are ready to be harvested. But it keeps raining just enough to put me off doing it... maybe over the weekend.

I had a minor flipout about invasives. I had hand-pulled so, so many invasives (before they could flower/berry) in the last month, before realizing that I needed to be carefully digging out every bit of root. Going back now to the same areas and digging up any roots that I find.

The area that I'm currently working in has no other plants (shady, woodchipped), but there are a lot of other areas with fully established plants intermixed with invasives that I don't know how to tease out the bad root systems without messing everything up. Any tips??

It's times like this that I remind myself to be grateful we didn't get the extra large yard that we wanted...

You can also cut down the stem of the invasive as low as you can. And repeat when it grows a new stem. Eventually a plant cannot live like that.

lhamo

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3293
  • Location: Seattle
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #172 on: July 04, 2024, 10:19:46 AM »
It has been so hot and humid outside over the last couple of weeks. Miserable!

Our blueberries on on their third wave of ripening, which is interesting... the ripening started two weeks earlier than last year, but is still going with new berries just starting to turn now.

Tomatoes are loving life. I planted potatoes much earlier than usual this year, so half of them are ready to be harvested. But it keeps raining just enough to put me off doing it... maybe over the weekend.

I had a minor flipout about invasives. I had hand-pulled so, so many invasives (before they could flower/berry) in the last month, before realizing that I needed to be carefully digging out every bit of root. Going back now to the same areas and digging up any roots that I find.

The area that I'm currently working in has no other plants (shady, woodchipped), but there are a lot of other areas with fully established plants intermixed with invasives that I don't know how to tease out the bad root systems without messing everything up. Any tips??

It's times like this that I remind myself to be grateful we didn't get the extra large yard that we wanted...

You can also cut down the stem of the invasive as low as you can. And repeat when it grows a new stem. Eventually a plant cannot live like that.

I have used this technique quite effectively with Bindweed.  Blackberries are harder -- worth the effort to dig out the crowns if at all possible.  I try to tackle really heavy removal projects in the late fall/early spring when the ground is wetter and squishier. That way if you do disturb the roots of other plants you want to keep in the same location it is also more likely that they will survive.

Sometimes you need to dig up both the plants you want to survive and the ones you want to eradicate and then replant the ones you are keeping.  Tedious but in the long term easier to keep up with than constantly cutting back invasives in a crowded bed.

Linea_Norway

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8605
  • Location: Norway
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #173 on: July 09, 2024, 02:25:21 PM »
My garden at home is looking healthy, although the kale's and palm kale's leaves are getting more and more perforations.

I harvested another batch of carrots, one portion I pickled and one portion I fermented.

Some weeks ago we threw a netting over the sweet cherry tree. But magpies still manage to get inside. We ended up picking the most mature ones. They are actually getting more mature after some days in a box. They are not overripe, but very edible.

I am currently at our cabin. There I have 4 rubarb bushes, 2 and 3 year old. One of them has grown a very large flower stem. I harvestes some stems from the other plants. Enough to bake a rubarb apple cake.

Yesterday we had some leftover green leaves from home. I found a great lot of chicken weed in the raised bed at the cabin. So I foraged the tops to make a salad, together with the green leaves and the mature cherry tomatoes I brought from home.
In the evening I pulled out all the chicked weed, as it was blocking the growth of the lovage that I transplanted there last visit. Some of the chives were growing through it, but only with a few leaves. Other chives growing the the same bed, uncovered by weeds, are much more healthy and flowering.

Beside one rubarb, the is also a very high green plant about to flower. I suspect it to be a carrot, as I might not have harvested all carrots in that area last year.

There are still a couple of asparges plants that I sowed I think 2 years ago. They still look small, in comparison to this years seedling asparges that I have at home in pots. I will transplant at them home this year.

Otherwise I have some potatoes there, varieties that I cannot grow at home because they are vulnerable for diseases. This area is too harsh for most potato diseases. I was a bit stressing that I would be too late to hill the potatoes here, but the season is so short that they are not so big plants yet.

The red current bushes are carrying green berries. That area has a very short season and I think the berries need a long time to turn red.

The flower bed has a lot of flowers. Some stil there after last year's planting, others planted this year.

At home, the black berries and currents have a lot of berries, but they are still sour.

My potatoes at home are behaving strangely. Not all sprouted, but some sprouted like 2 months late, with the some variety. So I will have longer harvest periods with each variety. The first potatoes are flowering now.

aloevera1

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 177
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #174 on: July 15, 2024, 10:30:09 AM »
Hi all!

It's been so long since I updated this thread.

It's middle of the season now. So far it's been a mixed success with the veggies. Some of it due to circumstances outside of my control (weather and getting really sick in June.. which is prime gardening time). Some of it was my silliness / laziness / lack of time.

Here is what's happening:

Tomatoes

Growing 10 varieties this year. Was really late to transplant them outside due to being sick. They just started blooming. Lots of work ahead with trimming, tying, etc. Hoping to start getting harvest mid-August.

Cucumbers

Hard to say so far. Their location is not optimal but we didn't switch the garden beds this year due to.. yes, being sick. So far cucumbers are starting to bloom but a few plants are really struggling. I hope they recover as weather gets warmer.

Peppers

Total fail this year. I am still struggling to diagnose the issue... The seedlings didn't develop beyond certain size. Did not get to flowering. The kicker is that we grew them before in EXACTLY SAME SETUP. Same temp, same light, etc. The only variable is the soil. I blame the soil (used normal soil instead of peat moss for seeds). The other issue with them was that in the beginning my partner was responsible for watering them. I think they were overwatered quite heavily a few times. I caught that, replanted them in fresh soil. But they never recovered.

Peas

Complete fail. They got eaten by voles. Those BUGGERS. Ughhh. I am very upset.

Garlic

My first time growing garlic. Not sure about the results so far but greens are delicious. I think I underwatered them quite severely in May/June.. not going to repeat myself as to why :D


Potatoes

Growing 3 or 4 varieties. Plants look nice, some bloomed already. They also look like they are going to start withering soon. Looking forward to digging out my harvest in about month-ish!

Cherries

I have good news and bad news. The good news is that this year harvest is HUGE. The bad news is some of it may be unedible. The largest tree already has a bunch of mildew.... YUCK!!! Hopefully it will stay isolated on that tree. I refuse to spray the trees against mildew so every year it's a race against the clock.
Another adventure with cherries is... aphids. So many aphids. I got behind on my soap spraying so they spread everywhere..... Catching up now. But gosh, the proactive management is so much easier. Don't get sick in June, people.

The other day I also noticed pear slugs on the cherry. Researching now what to do about it. Cherries always keep me busy.

Other

There are smaller things going on too. I'm trying to come up with better weed management strategy. I am always late on weeding (especially areas that are not garden beds).

Voles. I have no words. In addition to peas, they also completely shaved off the lillies. Coyote urine didn't help, will apply the second batch soon but my hopes are low. Probably need to start trapping them. Neighbours are also overrun. Maybe I need a barn cat.

Except lillies, other flowers have been quite successful so far. Sometimes when I get angry at the cherry issues I think about just covering my yard with flowers and forgetting about all the tree problems.

One of two lilacs has been pruned. In the winter I'll start hardcore pruning to bring the bush down to a more reasonable size. I read that people prune 1/3 of the trunks at the time. My trunks are thicker than 2 inches so they definitely need to go. There are some good young suckers to make them into a new bush.

Phew. I think this is all so far. Hoping for a smoother second half of the season.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2024, 10:33:31 AM by aloevera1 »

mspym

  • Senior Mustachian
  • ********
  • Posts: 10001
  • Location: Aotearoa
Re: Planting and growing your own 2024
« Reply #175 on: July 15, 2024, 01:17:25 PM »
@aloevera1 how frustrating! I hope you get some nice cherries out of it. *shakes fist at voles* we donít have voles here but we do have the neighbourís cats who dig up plants while pooping in the beds.

Here itís winter and I may have killed the new plants through underwatering and or frost. I kept testing the soil with my finger and it was moist but that may have been surface-only feom meltdd frost. I dunno, the grasses are still thriving as are some of the trees. Fortunately the second half of the month is forecast to be warmer and wetter - it rained a bit yesterday and it looks like some more today so hopefully everything recovers.

Weíve also modified the wire trellis structure for this next growing season and have built a leaf and clippings cage out of the old piece of wire fencing Ofpym removed. At the getting some more bricks for paving stage of bed construction and then Iíll get some more garden mix delivered for the expanded bed. The other task is looking through what seeds we have and which ones we want.