Author Topic: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022  (Read 7686 times)

Linea_Norway

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #50 on: January 15, 2022, 11:20:29 AM »
@Linea_Norway - I discovered the hard way many of the store bought pepper were F1 hybrids.   The seeds didn't even germinate.   I am going to keep better records of the seed source for everything this year so all the effort in collecting and the growing on is fruitful.

I used a small Norwegian producer that grew the seeds herself. She wrote a little article for every pepper and tomato, and the L1 species have that in their title and description. I rely on that my seeds are not L1. They are supposed to have a high germination rate, like 80%. I need only 2 plants, but planted 4 seeds. If nothing happens, I can try again later with the remaining seeds.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #51 on: January 15, 2022, 11:27:21 AM »
@Linea_Norway - I discovered the hard way many of the store bought pepper were F1 hybrids.   The seeds didn't even germinate.   I am going to keep better records of the seed source for everything this year so all the effort in collecting and the growing on is fruitful.

My 4th generation peppers came from the grocery store - the name of the variety was on them and I looked them up - OP variety, Shepherd.  I found the original variety (well now it was Super Shepherd) in a seed catalogue last year and grew both my own seed and the catalogue seed - my seed did better.  4 years of selection* for germinating and growing under my conditions.  So even a more commercial seed, if meant for open field production, can turn into a good home variety.

* I start way more seeds than I need - pot up (in small seed-starting pots) more than I need from the seeds that germinated - then repot the best of the small potted plants, then the garden gets the best of the potted plants.  Then I save seeds from the first fully ripe pepper on the first 3 plants to have ripe peppers (and that also have lots more peppers coming along), so I am selecting for vigour under my conditions all the way, and earliness in the plants that get seeds saved.

I read in a book about direct sowing outside that said that you should preferable sow 3 seeds for each plant you want to saw, all in the same hole you made with your finger. And when they are growing, rigorously pull out the weekest saplings.

I used a little seeding box with a seed in each bowl, 4 of each type. Except for the Padron, where I added a few seeds in each box, as ai have no faith at all that they will grow.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #52 on: January 15, 2022, 01:36:38 PM »
@Linea_Norway - I discovered the hard way many of the store bought pepper were F1 hybrids.   The seeds didn't even germinate.   I am going to keep better records of the seed source for everything this year so all the effort in collecting and the growing on is fruitful.

My 4th generation peppers came from the grocery store - the name of the variety was on them and I looked them up - OP variety, Shepherd.  I found the original variety (well now it was Super Shepherd) in a seed catalogue last year and grew both my own seed and the catalogue seed - my seed did better.  4 years of selection* for germinating and growing under my conditions.  So even a more commercial seed, if meant for open field production, can turn into a good home variety.

* I start way more seeds than I need - pot up (in small seed-starting pots) more than I need from the seeds that germinated - then repot the best of the small potted plants, then the garden gets the best of the potted plants.  Then I save seeds from the first fully ripe pepper on the first 3 plants to have ripe peppers (and that also have lots more peppers coming along), so I am selecting for vigour under my conditions all the way, and earliness in the plants that get seeds saved.

I read in a book about direct sowing outside that said that you should preferable sow 3 seeds for each plant you want to saw, all in the same hole you made with your finger. And when they are growing, rigorously pull out the weekest saplings.

I used a little seeding box with a seed in each bowl, 4 of each type. Except for the Padron, where I added a few seeds in each box, as ai have no faith at all that they will grow.

I usually plant more as well and thin.  For peas and beans I will do a pre-soak overnight.  Any that don't swell don't get planted.  Almost all the ones that absorb water will germinate, so I don't need to plant a lot extra.  This is really helpful with old seed where germination can be poor.

My peppers are indoor starts, since our growing season is so short, and they grow so slowly.  My apartment is not as warm as they would like, so they go in damp paper towel in a plastic bag in the oven with the light on.  That gives just enough added heat that they are happy.  As soon as there is germination (tiny root shows) I plant them as usual in a small pot and cover them.  So it may be 3-5 days in the oven and then another 3-5 days before I see the seedling.  Again since the first to germinate get planted, and I put 2 seeds in a pot and only keep the stronger, I start with what should be strong plants.  Really the seedlings would also like my apartment to be warmer, and if I am in a hurry with them I will put the plant tray on a heat mat so they grow faster.  But generally I want them to be as cold tolerant as I can manage without being too hard on them.  They will take more cold as seedlings than they will when they are germinating. I do all this since they are really not meant to grow in my climate. 

Neither are tomatoes, but they germinate and grow so fast that I only start them 4-6 weeks before they go out.  I've had tomatoes germinate in the garden when I missed a tomato in fall clean-up. but they swtart so late that they never produce much of a crop, if any.

lhamo

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #53 on: January 16, 2022, 09:56:02 AM »
Can't remember if I mentioned here already, but I had very good results with seeds saved from store-bought bell peppers last year. I think I am going to go ahead and buy some seed this year, though.

I think I planted my jalapenos too late -- the plants grew fine, but never developed flowers.  Those  were also saved seed so maybe that was the issue. I'll buy seed for those this year because we eat a fair amount of jalapenos.

The other pepper that did really well for me this year was thai chilis-- the small ones.  Those came from seeds of the dried peppers that I got from a neighbor in 2020.  One little plant produces quite   a lot  of  chilis on it. 

One thing I am thinking of doing is using different types of pepper as one of the "fill" components of the "thrill, fill and spill" approach to building attractive container plantings.  Monty Don mentioned this formula on a recent episode of Gardener's World and I love both the idea and how easy it is to remember.  The idea is you have one really dramatic plant (the "thrill") -- maybe something with a dramatic spikey flower or foliage, or really abundant or large colorful blossoms.  Then you have a bunch of leafier less dramatic plants that fill out the display. And then you have things like alyssum or lobelia or decorative ivies or something that will trail over the edge of the planter.  He was planting  a winter container and had a really gorgous hellebore as the thrill  piece,  violets  or   pansies  as  the fill, and I can't remember what the spill was.  Guess I should watch that episode again! 

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #54 on: January 16, 2022, 10:45:07 AM »
Can't remember if I mentioned here already, but I had very good results with seeds saved from store-bought bell peppers last year. I think I am going to go ahead and buy some seed this year, though.

I think I planted my jalapenos too late -- the plants grew fine, but never developed flowers.  Those  were also saved seed so maybe that was the issue. I'll buy seed for those this year because we eat a fair amount of jalapenos.

The other pepper that did really well for me this year was thai chilis-- the small ones.  Those came from seeds of the dried peppers that I got from a neighbor in 2020.  One little plant produces quite   a lot  of  chilis on it. 

One thing I am thinking of doing is using different types of pepper as one of the "fill" components of the "thrill, fill and spill" approach to building attractive container plantings.  Monty Don mentioned this formula on a recent episode of Gardener's World and I love both the idea and how easy it is to remember.  The idea is you have one really dramatic plant (the "thrill") -- maybe something with a dramatic spikey flower or foliage, or really abundant or large colorful blossoms.  Then you have a bunch of leafier less dramatic plants that fill out the display. And then you have things like alyssum or lobelia or decorative ivies or something that will trail over the edge of the planter.  He was planting  a winter container and had a really gorgous hellebore as the thrill  piece,  violets  or   pansies  as  the fill, and I can't remember what the spill was.  Guess I should watch that episode again!

That is pretty standard, I have been to gardening presentations that showed the same thing.  Because it works!

Sweet potatoes have pretty leaves, I have seen decorative varieties at greenhouses here.  Edible sweet potatoes have really big leaves so wouldn't work well for a spill unless the whole container was large.

Winter containers here are evergreens - cut branches - something big and green, maybe some colourful bare branches and smaller evergreens for fill, and then drooping branches for spill.  This has some nice examples.

https://www.thegardenglove.com/make-winter-garden-planters/

Linea_Norway

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #55 on: January 18, 2022, 05:42:29 AM »
DH recently read on Instagram or likewise how you could spot that a gardener is poor. That is when the gardener uses yoghurt containers instead of proper pots.
Here are my yoghurt containers with chili and red pepper seeds.


RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #56 on: January 18, 2022, 06:54:53 AM »
DH recently read on Instagram or likewise how you could spot that a gardener is poor. That is when the gardener uses yoghurt containers instead of proper pots.
Here are my yoghurt containers with chili and red pepper seeds.

Frugal/thrifty/environmentally conscious these days, not poor.   ;-)

Good luck with the peppers!

lhamo

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #57 on: January 18, 2022, 09:51:49 AM »
I use the yogurt containers to make markers for my plants.

The pots I scavange from neighbors who buy seedlings at nurseries.  Always have way more than I need! 

tygertygertyger

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #58 on: January 18, 2022, 11:15:10 AM »
I reuse the nursery plastic pots always - I have enough that I can even color code some of the seedlings. And when I give away plant to friends, I make clear that the pots must be returned, as I have a system.

~

Also. We put out bird feeders a few weeks ago. We now have a regular flock of sparrows/juncos/nuthatches, and a lady cardinal who despises all others. We also have three resident squirrels who live in our tall pine trees, and descend to stand guard at their favorite bird feeder. All this is fun.

Then today, 4 more squirrels joined the fray in the yard. Who invited them?! They were everywhere, crawling along the fence, hunting for dropped seeds on the ground. I riled up my dopey dog and sent him out to do a lap of the yard. (My dog has never caught anything. He likes to run and chase and watch them scatter.)

This does not seem to bode well for either my new cherry tree, my potted blueberry bushes, or a future vegetable garden. I have some bird netting that was a pain in the ass last year, but if anyone has squirrel-proofing ideas, I am game to hear them! I don't mind sharing with the locals but when they invite all their friends I get wary.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #59 on: January 18, 2022, 02:30:30 PM »
I use the yogurt containers to make markers for my plants.

The pots I scavange from neighbors who buy seedlings at nurseries.  Always have way more than I need!

I do this too!

And milk cartons - great because they are tall, for tomato seedlings that are getting leggy.  By the time they go in the garden they have wonderful root systems.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #60 on: January 20, 2022, 02:48:29 AM »
I use the yogurt containers to make markers for my plants.

The pots I scavange from neighbors who buy seedlings at nurseries.  Always have way more than I need!

I do this too!

And milk cartons - great because they are tall, for tomato seedlings that are getting leggy.  By the time they go in the garden they have wonderful root systems.

I will use milk cartons to seed the carrots. Then I will dig them down in the caton, like shown in the link that Gaja posted. Maybe I will use it for my tomato too.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #61 on: January 20, 2022, 02:59:59 AM »
A new development today... The only remaining pot of my 3 pots of kaffir limeseeds is now sprouting several seeds. That is months after I planted them. Maybe because I put it on a heating tray. I had already emptied one pot of kaffir lime seeds in my bokashi to reuse the soil. And I used the top half soil of another pot (including all the seeds) in the growing containers of some chilies. So I guess those kaffir lime seeds may also sprout, together with the chilies. That might get messy, as I prefer the chili.
I definitively don't need many kaffir lime, so I can rigorously remove the weakest seeds after a while.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2022, 01:43:48 PM by Linea_Norway »

Linea_Norway

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #62 on: January 20, 2022, 03:04:46 AM »
Question for use of the English language:

What do you call the stuff that we put in pots to grow seeds?

I (as a non native speaker) would like to call it "earth", but often correct it to "soil", as I think you wouldn't use earth. But the internet says that "soil" is the layer outside that contains worms and stuff. There is also the American word "dirt". But to me "dirt" also sounds outside. I prefer to speak/write British English, just to be consequent.

Can I just use the word "ground"?
« Last Edit: January 20, 2022, 07:51:24 AM by Linea_Norway »

Weisass

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #63 on: January 20, 2022, 05:55:44 AM »
Question for use of the English language:

What do you call the stuff that we put in pots to grow seeds?

I (as a non native speaker) would like to call it "earth", but often correct it to "soil", as I think you wouldn't use earth. But the internet says that "soil" is the layer outside that contains worms and stuff. The is also the American word "dirt". But to me "dirt" also sounds outside. I prefer to speak/write British English, just to be consequent.

Can I just use the word "ground"?

I think it depends on the gardener. If you go to the store here to buy it, it is usually called ďpotting soilĒ or something like that. I have also heard gardeners call it ďstarting mediumĒ or ďsoil mixĒ.

the_hobbitish

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #64 on: January 20, 2022, 06:57:02 AM »
It's also potting soil/potting compost/potting mix in my area as opposed to "garden soil." Some of the gardening shows I watch suggest mixing a little "garden soil" into your "potting soil" when you pot up a seedling to add in all the microbes that are in your garden outside.

I think soil has a connotation of being good for growing plants, but dirt does not. You can call dry dusty sandy stuff dirt, but you wouldn't usually call it soil. At least in my region, so much of language is where you are.

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #65 on: January 20, 2022, 07:27:26 AM »
The stuff I use to start seedlings in is seed starting mix - often is a mix of peat / compost / sand and in some cases, it is a soilless growing medium.

Earth - I think of planet earth.  But in the context of planting a tree I push the earth back into the hole. 
Soil I think of the matrix of materials both living and mineral - and I would fill a pot with soil.  (perhaps even from the hole I dug to plant the tree above)
When I buy bags of "growing mediums"  it could be a soil mix (it would have a mix of mineral and organic materials such as compost, manure, as well as mineral materials such as clay, sand and silts, as well as some fertilizer components)
For seed starting I use a mix called 'seed starter'.  It tends to have very little fertility - and is really just to support a root system get a balance of light / oxygen / moisture

Linea_Norway

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #66 on: January 20, 2022, 07:39:09 AM »
Thanks for explaining, all. I think I used "seed starter" for all my seeds. For this year I bought a bag of "seed mulch", but haven't opened it yet, as I finished the bag of seed starter first. I will buy a new bag of proper potting soil when I start my tomato seeds. And mix it with my own bokashi.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2022, 07:52:41 AM by Linea_Norway »

gaja

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #67 on: January 20, 2022, 08:42:37 AM »
I'm planting a lot this year, so I'm experimenting with the potting soil:
-for seeds that are stratifying outdoors, I have heat treated garden soil (cooked it on the grill for about an hour) and mixed that with sand and biochar.
-for indoor seeds that I broadsow, like leeks and onions, I use purchased potting mix, with a layer of vermiculite to keep it moist while avoiding fungal growth.
-for seeds that are going to be babied more, I use peat plugs. This is the only peat I'm going to use this year. I tried plugs made from coco coir last year, but the plants grew quite badly in that stuff

Weisass

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #68 on: January 20, 2022, 09:22:35 AM »
I tried plugs made from coco coir last year, but the plants grew quite badly in that stuff

Same. I bought a block of coco coir thinking it would be a fun experiment, and it just didn't do it for me.

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #69 on: January 20, 2022, 11:09:04 AM »
The problem with a lot of the seed starting mixes is that there is very little nutrition in them for long term growth.  I have been potting up to a mix with some compost / manure and actual garden soil and / or being really generous with red hen fertilizer.  For the larger soil block mix, I have been adding a fertilizer into the soil mix.

The advantage of the red hen fertilizer is that it repels squirrels for some days until it is no longer "fresh" aka stinks real bad.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #70 on: January 20, 2022, 12:13:39 PM »
I just watched a video by Scott Head - first part is his winter garden harvest, second is doing a bio-assay for herbicides.  I am most familiar with Roundup but there is one new to me, Grazon, that is sprayed on pastures and it goes right through the cattle that are grazed on it and kills broad-leaf plants* when the composted manure is used on a garden.  He has also found it in hay (not straw so far).  I checked and there are 4 broad-leaf weed-killers approved in Canada for range management (broad-leaf weeds and especially tree seedlings), including Grazon, so this could be a problem here as well as in the US - and possibly other places too.

So to do the bioassay, he puts a bit of the composted manure in a pot, and plants a few bean and tomato seeds because they are very susceptible to damage.  If they grow well the manure is not contaminated.  Foliage curls horribly if the plant is exposed to Grazon.  I don't know what it does with other herbicides, but it won't look normal.

I know the compost we get at my community garden is variable in quality, so this year I am not going to get it put on my plot, but just get a bit from the left-over pile and check it. If it is good I will use it.  Same for the bags of manure I buy.

Theoretically if they are contaminated I could use the manure on my asparagus, corn and onions/garlic, but I would rather not eat potentially contaminated foods.  I will give them to DD for her lawn.  They will break down eventually.


*Basic botany:  seeds can be monocots or dicots ("cot" is short for cotyledon, the seed leaf).  Monocots have a single seed leaf, dicots have 2 seed leaves.  So if you look at a seedling and it has one single shoot, like an onion or a corn plant, it is a monocot.  If it has 2, like a bean, it is a dicot.  Peas are dicots, but their seed leaves stay underground.  Once we see true leaves, the veins in a monocot leaf are parallel, but the veins on a dicot leaf are not.  Flowers - monocots have flower parts in multiples of 3, dicots have flower parts in multiples of 4 or 5.  Of course fused parts can make this difficult to check, but the leaf veins are always a guide.

the_hobbitish

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #71 on: January 21, 2022, 11:28:35 AM »
I had the herbicide problem with a large order of compost last year. My tomatoes and cucumbers mostly outgrew it though weakly. The watermelon sprouts looked like they were from another planet and never got more than a few inches tall. I'm hoping it's mostly gone this year though I know it can take several years to dissipate. I'm not sure how I'm going to handle topping my beds off this year - order some bags from the garden center and make them refund the cost if I can't use them? How is everyone else handling it?

Is this a problem with alfalfa and other rabbit feed? I have a coworker with rabbits and would like to be able to use the free rabbit manure.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #72 on: January 21, 2022, 02:58:08 PM »
I had the herbicide problem with a large order of compost last year. My tomatoes and cucumbers mostly outgrew it though weakly. The watermelon sprouts looked like they were from another planet and never got more than a few inches tall. I'm hoping it's mostly gone this year though I know it can take several years to dissipate. I'm not sure how I'm going to handle topping my beds off this year - order some bags from the garden center and make them refund the cost if I can't use them? How is everyone else handling it?

Is this a problem with alfalfa and other rabbit feed? I have a coworker with rabbits and would like to be able to use the free rabbit manure.

I saw it mostly with pasture.  Good hay is a mix of grasses and legumes and other broad-leaf plants so it should be OK?  But you could take some old rabbit manure form your coworker and see how some seeds do in it. 

I know there was always the discussion in organic gardening circles about using grass clippings from other peoples' lawns if you didn't know whether or not they sprayed for weeds, so the basic issue is not new.  The thing here is the persistence through cattle digestive tracts.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #73 on: January 21, 2022, 03:08:31 PM »
Today I finished the book Holzer's Permaculture. According to him, if you leave your weeds and plants on the ground, you don't need to use compost. After pulling out the weeds, you leave them on the ground. Plants can also be left there, without pulling them out, after harvesting them. It will all compost. Is that something you will be able to use in your garden?

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #74 on: January 21, 2022, 03:23:40 PM »
@the_hobbitish - It sort of sounds like your compost could have been high in chlorides based on your comment about the tomatoes and cucumbers. It is very common in compost.  (about 3 of every four soil samples I review per year are high in chlorides) 

It can be remediated with watering and dissolving it out.  Typically with a soil, the spring rains will make enough of a difference. 
For a herbicide, it would target alfalfa so I doubt rabbit manure would be a problem. Cows are fed corn and soybeans - the most common crops sprayed with herbicides.

If your compost is covered - expose it to the elements and get it rinsed out. 

@Linea_Norway - I do use green manure technique - but only if there is no seed on the weeds.  My organic farmer friend showed me how to lay the roots on top of leaves and stems so that they got baked in the sun and couldn't work their way back into the soil.  I have also started leaving the roots of crops in the garden and just trimming the tops back as a mulch.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #75 on: January 22, 2022, 11:33:44 AM »
The chili pepper seeds I bought from a seed shop started to grow little green plants after 1 week. I put them in front of the window, and on the normal heated floor, off the heating mat. This is the Brazilian Starfish.

The seeds I took from the padron pepper and normal red pepper from the grocery shop have not grown a plant yet. Also not the dried many years old chili pepper that I planted the seeds from.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #76 on: January 31, 2022, 07:40:07 AM »
The bell pepper seeds I planted from a red bell pepper from the grocery store sprouted as well.

I planted some sweet pepper seeds as well, that are now standing on the warming mat. Don't know if they will sprout.

I now have 8 yoghurt containers with chilis/peppers. They need to be reduced to 4 later, 2 of each. I joined a local plant swapping facebook group in my own community. As soon as they have grown more substancial, I will offer them to swap for something else.

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #77 on: January 31, 2022, 07:42:34 AM »
I spent a little time on Sunday getting my grow rack for seedlings plugged in.  Lights and heat are ready for action.
Just need a few of the seeds in my big seed order to come: I want to start onions right now and peppers really really soon.

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #78 on: January 31, 2022, 11:32:22 AM »
The Shetland kale needed far shorter stratification than I thought, so the seedlings got quite leggy before I saved them from the fridge. They got some days under the grow lights, and today I transplanted 14 of the strongest ones. Hope they make it! The tomatillos were the first to emerge of the heat loving plants, and the last few days a few artichokes have popped up too. I think it is a bit too cold for my peppers to sprout, but I havenít got my heat mat here. If they donít show any sign of life soon, Iíll have to find a creative solution. Non of the trees have sprouted yet, but that is to be expected, as they need 100 days of stratification.

Outside, the first green leaves of the snowdrops had popped up, before they got covered by snow today. Hopefully it melts soon, because Iím getting ready to see some spring!

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #79 on: January 31, 2022, 01:28:29 PM »
I am getting curious to try growing loofah. It seems like it's best in zone 7+, but I'm reading that it can also work in zone 6 (my area) if you start it indoors. Does anyone have any experience with it? If it worked... I could dry it and make it into Christmas presents, which seems very cool. Even if not, it's okay to experiment. 

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #80 on: January 31, 2022, 03:22:29 PM »
I am getting curious to try growing loofah. It seems like it's best in zone 7+, but I'm reading that it can also work in zone 6 (my area) if you start it indoors. Does anyone have any experience with it? If it worked... I could dry it and make it into Christmas presents, which seems very cool. Even if not, it's okay to experiment.
In my area there is a loofah growing club as a subgroup on Facebook.  Lots of people had success.  We are zone 5 in the agriculture Canada growing zone map.  They are starting again now, but I haven't gotten on that wagon.  (I have enough on my plate right now)

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #81 on: February 04, 2022, 04:52:21 AM »
Joining in!  Thanks for getting things going this year @Frugal Lizard!

I'm trying to not buy anything this year, as I have all the seeds and supplies I should need.  So far so good. 

I'm in the planning stage and will be starting a few things soon in my bought-used grow cabinet, using saved and scavenged nursery seedling containers. 

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #82 on: February 04, 2022, 06:09:20 AM »
I think I have enough seeds left over (and most other gardening supplies) that I don't need to order anything.  The main thing I was worrying about was the onion seeds, and a test germination was good enough.  Ritchie's Feed and Seed has good supplies if I do need seeds last minute.

My gardening season is enough behind Frugal Lizard's that I need to restrain myself and not plant anything yet.  Well except the 9 baby peppers I already have up.

Planning ahead - my garden doesn't have slugs (so far) and the first year was fine, but last year we had snails.  They were almost as destructive as slugs.  Any suggestions on control  beside the obvious one of drowning in a bowl of beer?  The garden is very restrictive about chemical controls, no herbicides, no pesticides.

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #83 on: February 04, 2022, 08:18:22 AM »
I tried to be more frugal this year with ordering seeds and have probably only spent 66% of last years spend. 

One of the treats I bought myself this year was a brand new scythe from Lee Valley.  My big garden at the farm is surrounded by garlic mustard and burdock and golden rod and thistles.  I torture myself a couple of times a season wrestling with a horrible weed whacker. (My dad liked using the most powerful motor he could purchase) As I farted around getting it running, and then using it (the trimming requires more than one tank of gas mix) and getting all tired and stinky and ear ringy (despite the PPE), I dreamed of the quiet workout with a good sharp scythe.  So I used some Christmas money and get me one complete with the sharpening kit. 

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #84 on: February 04, 2022, 08:24:02 AM »
That's fantastic @Frugal Lizard!  It's a long-handled scythe?  (Not a short sickle?)  I've dreamed of getting one of those; please do post and let us know how you get on.   

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #85 on: February 04, 2022, 08:54:35 AM »
https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/garden/lawn-care/scythes/10198-traditional-austrian-scythe-set?item=PC509

@Trifele - I believe there is a learning curve to use it - that and keeping it really really sharp.  It is super light and I think it will be a great workout.

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #86 on: February 04, 2022, 10:49:58 AM »
@Frugal Lizard ó thatís fantastic!  I believe itís a great workout. Iíve not done it yet myself but Iíve watched how-to videos and the people demonstrating work up a sweat. 

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #87 on: February 04, 2022, 01:01:37 PM »
I had a Lee Valley scythe at last house.  It was great for coarse weeds, except in really tight areas - you need room to swing.  There is a definite learning curve.  And take regular breaks to sharpen the blade.  Wear protective foot and leg gear.

 The only disadvantage is that it is meant to be used right handed.  When I dig or rake I alternate between sides so both get an equal workout.    I couldn't do that with the scythe.

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #88 on: February 04, 2022, 01:53:32 PM »
Great tips @RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #89 on: February 04, 2022, 02:00:46 PM »
https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/garden/lawn-care/scythes/10198-traditional-austrian-scythe-set?item=PC509

@Trifele - I believe there is a learning curve to use it - that and keeping it really really sharp.  It is super light and I think it will be a great workout.

The learning curve is not so steep. I own a scythe for use at our cabin where we often meet high grass when we arrive. When I used it the first time, there was only one logical way to hold it and swipe it. And that is how I can cut the grass. The challenge is to not swipe into stones and concrete walls, which are often standing in the way.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2022, 04:53:58 AM by Linea_Norway »

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #90 on: February 04, 2022, 03:02:29 PM »
You need the scythe to be really sharp to cut grass, because it bends with the blade.  Weeds with a thick stem take more effort to actually cut through, but they stay put for the blade.  I used to use an electric string trimmer for grass (and it got into tight places easily) but the scythe was so much better for the coarse stuff.

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #91 on: February 04, 2022, 07:11:39 PM »
I purchased the sharpener for the scythe as well as the kit.  I just have to get back into shape before the meadow invades my garden.


RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #92 on: February 04, 2022, 07:51:04 PM »
I purchased the sharpener for the scythe as well as the kit.  I just have to get back into shape before the meadow invades my garden.

When I bought mine, probably 10 or 12 years ago now, the sharpening stone came with the scythe.  It was a water stone and had a little plastic holder for the stone and water that you could attach to your belt.  I thought that really emphasized the importance of sharpening regularly while you were cutting.

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #93 on: February 07, 2022, 07:10:33 AM »
I purchased the sharpener for the scythe as well as the kit.  I just have to get back into shape before the meadow invades my garden.

When I bought mine, probably 10 or 12 years ago now, the sharpening stone came with the scythe.  It was a water stone and had a little plastic holder for the stone and water that you could attach to your belt.  I thought that really emphasized the importance of sharpening regularly while you were cutting.
I got the same impression.  I think I might also buy some shin protection - I have steel toed boots.

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #94 on: February 10, 2022, 09:05:39 PM »
Oh boy, gardening season is upon us! Iím upgrading my indoor seed starting set up this year so I assembled the shelving and will attach the lights tomorrow. My previous set up was very hack-y and hideous. I try to be economical with my garden purchases but this is definitely a hobby and not a money-saving activity.

I ordered a few seeds but didnít need much to supplement what I already had. I just ran out of green beans and peas since I tend to use the entire packet for those. Iíll start a few spring seedlings soon and wait another month for the warm weather veggies.

Good luck this year, everyone!

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #95 on: February 11, 2022, 05:15:54 AM »
Yesterday I repotted all my chilis and peppers from seedling mix to potting soil for vegetables, according to the pack. Both of the fresh peppers from the grocery store worked, a bell pepper and a sweet pepper. I have now 4 yoghurt boxes of each, plus 4 brazilian starfish chilis. Plus de Cayenne peppers from last year. I wonder whether I should give them fresh soil as well.

When repotting the chilis, I decided to ditch the pots with very old chili seeds, as nothing had come up there for weeks. When I emptied the seedling container, I noticed that I had crushed a little seedling that was growing somewhere deep underneath. It was already broken when I noticed it. At start, I had planted these old seeds way too deep. Later, I replanted some other seeds, a bit higher in the same pot. I left the 2 last pots with these seeds. One of them is sprouting something. Don't know whether it is that chili, or another kaffir lime, as I reused the soil from a discarded pot of kaffir lime seeds. We'll see what it turns out to be.

I also reorganized my spreadsheet to contain dates of all my seeds. I think the eldest are from 2004. Always kept in an icecream box in the fridge, but never frozen.

The temperatures outside have been below and above zero Celsius. Therefore the snow on top of my garlic pots has smelted and some garlics think it is spring and have stuck there head out. But luckily not all of them. I hope they still survive. They stand in pots under a roof at this moment.

Some of the kaffir lime seeds in the container that I kept are sprouting. I put them in front of the window, with the peppers. Nothing has happened with them for a while. I think it is too early to replant anything, as the sprout are tiny.
Maybe it is just a very slow plant.

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #96 on: February 11, 2022, 08:25:43 AM »
@Linea_Norway - sometimes I germinate test seeds - to save space and avoid mishaps.  My method involves a damp paper towel or flannel cloth and a clear plastic bag.  I soak the seed for a little bit and then place between two wet layers and slip into a plastic bag.  Then place on the warm spot.  (I have heated mats, but I also use the top of the furnace.  I only pot up the seeds that actually break dormancy.  You gotta check every day and older seed sometimes takes twice as long as the newer seed to break dormancy.

A lot of plants are really busy growing a robust root.  The paw paws I germinated last year looked like dead sticks but when I dumped the pots, there was a great tuberous root structure so I ended up planting them all out.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #97 on: February 11, 2022, 09:18:37 AM »

A lot of plants are really busy growing a robust root.  The paw paws I germinated last year looked like dead sticks but when I dumped the pots, there was a great tuberous root structure so I ended up planting them all out.

Carol Deppe has said starting squash in pots is a bad idea, because it promotes the plants that have weak root systems.  Squash seeds direct sown make a big root before there is much top growth.  If we have a late spring I will do squash seeds in pots, but in really tall pots with lots of room for roots.  Itty bitty squash plant in a great big pot is just about right.   ;-)

I know I end up repotting my tomatoes 3 times before they go in the ground.  Seeds germinated the way you describe get potted up in small pots  When roots start showing at the drainage holes they move to larger pots.  And then they end up in 1 L milk cartons (I make drainage holes of course), which are the tallest thing I can manage.  My tomatoes have really good root systems when the weather is finally warm enough for them to go in the ground.  Our growing season is short enough that I need plants that are ready to take off.


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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #98 on: February 14, 2022, 10:36:49 AM »
Two years ago I germinated squash seeds on a humid paper towel and they sprouted fine. Then I put the little seedling in a huge pot. The squash worked very well.

Today I sowed a bag of mix baby salad in a tupperware style box to have in the kitchen. Together with basil seeds from a jar that I bought in a food store. No idea if those will sprout or whether they have been heat dried. I was a bit dumb to use all the salad seeds at once. Maybe I should have kept half for later use. But at least I used up an opened pack from a few years ago. If this works and it is eaten up, I might follow up with a old pack of spinach.

A few days ago I also sowed the celeriac that I am going to plant at the cabin. This is very early, but I have understood that this is a very slow growing plant. And the sommer season at cabin is very short.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2022
« Reply #99 on: February 16, 2022, 09:19:30 AM »
The baby salad leaves that I sowed to days ago are already sprouting. That was extremely fast.
The chili amd pepper plants are developing their next set of leaves.