Author Topic: Basic Tools  (Read 16089 times)

yogagirl95

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Basic Tools
« on: March 05, 2014, 09:10:07 AM »
I recently bought my own house, and I don't have any tools ( my soon to be ex does). I am in need of a drill, and haven't seen any in my thrift store. What whould be the best option? I am thinking this would pay for itself in labor saved. I hired out someone to do 2 big jobs but for instance I need to install a toilet paper holder.

Weedy Acres

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2014, 09:27:11 AM »
Try a local pawn shop.  If you're just looking at small tasks around the house then you don't need to worry about getting a name brand high powered one.  But I would recommend a cordless one.

If you get to the point where you need some nicer or heavier duty tools, I have found many good deals on nearly new or reconditioned tools on ebay for 50-70% of the new price. 

You can also rent tools if there's something specialized that you need and aren't likely to need repeatedly.

Greg

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2014, 10:05:59 AM »
I recommend a cordless drill/impact driver set.  One is a drill for making holes, and can also drive screws etc.  The other is an impact driver which is a powerful kind of driver that can drive fasteners that a normal drill might have trouble doing. Also handy for car work with the use of a 3/8" drive socket adapter.

I use Makita, but there are other cheaper brands that are just as good for a homeowner.  Look for 14v or better.  Newer designs are probably a better buy, the battery technology is more current (heh) and you'll be able to get replacements longer if needed.

I would recommend a drill (and driver if you want) with a charger and at least 2 batteries, a case.  A set of drills and bits is a good idea also.  Look at the Ah ratings of the batteries, the smaller batteries don't last as long on a charge.

I've never been a big fan of all the other cordless tools offered, so I would avoid the big sets with all the other tools.

Hope that helps.

yogagirl95

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2014, 10:09:26 AM »
yes it does help! This is all new to me, but I am having fun with it.

phred

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2014, 11:24:46 AM »
1/4 inch drill - nice if cordless, but doesn't need to be.  drill bit a bit smaller than inner diameter of t.p. screw -- take screw to hardware store/Home Depot will help you.  plastic anchors -- get when get drill bit, a screwdriver to fir tp screw - again get when get drill bit...
Other tools for someday: phillips screwdrivers: #1 and #2, curved claw hammer, tack hammer, slip joint pliers, adjustable wrench, diagonal cutters, needlenose pliers, utility knife
  Stanley 65-piece homeowners tool set will probably have everything you need for the first year.  To it I would add a torpedo level.  Don't buy any cheap import tools; they just don't last.  Don't buy a cast head hammer; they don't last; get a hammer with a drop-forged head (14 to 16 ounce size).
  Add a six foot stepladder; no kitchen or chores ladder; get a real stepladder

dcheesi

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2014, 12:35:00 PM »
In my (limited) experience, I've found that with power tools (especially one as broadly useful  as  a drill), it's better to go with quality. I initially had an old hand-me-down drill, and it sucked so much that some projects just didn't get done. When I finally upgraded to a Bosch lithium cordless, it was a night & day difference in power and ease of use.

With hand tools I'm the opposite; I'll buy a cheap version from Harbor Freight or the like, and only if/when it fails will I consider buying the higher quality version. Nine times out of ten the cheap tool does the job well enough for the few times that I need it.

Prairie Stash

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2014, 12:53:49 PM »
I had a cordless drill, it's terrible for light home maintenance.  I find my tasks get completed quicker with a corded drill; I never have a dead battery so I pick up the drill and get done without pausing if batteries are low (which happens if they sit too long between uses).  After my last cordless battery died from age (batteries have shelf lives, expensive to replace) I bought a cheaper and more reliable impact drill. The real purpose of cordless is when you don't you have plug ins and a short extension cord. KISS principle.

For simple shelves putting furniture together, get a $20 drill. They all put screws in the same, the expensive ones just last longer, but you're only needing something for a few thousand screws, a $20 drill will last a decade or more.  I checked Walmart online, they have one for $10, no bits though (Yes, it really will attach the toilet paper holder to the wall).

Please refrain from your arguments about its not that hard to charge batteries, it's even easier to reach a plug in. I also already agree for major use a cordless is better, the post was about minor tasks done infrequently.

Mori

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2014, 01:31:51 PM »
If you can stand to wait, I'd wander through Harbor Freight/Ace Hardware/Lowe's/Home Depot and pick out one you like, then wait until it's on sale. :)

I recommend looking and trying them in person because some drills are less awkward to use than others--I have smaller hands so I tried to find something with a good fit. Milwaukee worked better for me than Dewalt, but that was just a fit thing. This isn't as important for really minor stuff but it becomes more so if you take on things that have you messing with the drill for hours at a time (multiple sets of drapes, multiple small projects in a row).

You could also try pawn shops or craigslist--have you looked at either?

Russ

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2014, 01:47:10 PM »
+1 for corded, cheaper and far more durable

you can get a nice corded drill that will last you the rest of your life for $20 on craigslist if you're patient

Exflyboy

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2014, 02:11:34 PM »
I need to make a clarification between a standard corded drill and a cordless drill and its more than just the battery.

A standard corded drill cannot be used to drive screws.. the reason being is when you pull the trigger the drill will go up to a set speed and  you let go of the trigger the drill will continue to rotate and then slow down. This is USELESS for driving screws... Its also the cheapest. Great for drilling holes but not for driving screws.

A "cordless drill" really a battery driven screwdriver which also good at drilling holes. In this case the torque/speed of the chuck is dependent an how far you pull the trigger. The chuck will also immediately stop rotating when you release the trigger. This is exactly what you want for driving screws and it will drill holes well too.

Now I did find a corded drill once that acted like a cordless drill that I still have it was made by Ryobi.. I put up my cedar deck with it.

Most drills these days will come with a 3/8th" capacity chuck (suitable for most jobs) but larger 1/2" capacity chucks I have found are worth the extra money.

The Impact battery driver that Chuck mentioned above is purely for driving screws and only comes in a battery version. This device is superb.. you can drive long screws into hard wood with very little effort.

Like Chuck mentioned I would look for a cordless combo set and I personally would be prepared to spend a little more money to get a good set. I have found good deals on Dewalt stuff. I usually buy cheap tools but anything with a battery if I try to go cheap I regret it as they don't seem to last.

I bought my dewalt combo with 2 batteries and a quick charger for about $180 I think but they will last a loong time and drill any hole or drive any screw.

Frank

hokiegb

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2014, 02:48:36 PM »
Having just recently started using a cordless drill (previously used a corded exclusively) I have become a HUGE fan of the cordless! Makes quick work of all the little jobs around the house: hanging shelves, putting up the toilet paper holder and towel bars, etc. I still use the corded for the heavy duty work, but the cordless is much handier for me to use for day-to-day little jobs.
I would check ebay and craigslist first, then see what specials are running at your local Lowes/Home Depot/hardware store.

luigi49

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2014, 03:28:02 PM »
Hammer
A good quality carpenter’s hammer with a comfortable handle is a must.

   

Assorted screwdrivers
Make sure you have a good selection of plain, cross-head and torx screwdrivers in various sizes.

   

Awl
Also known as a bradawl, it is a useful tool for making small holes in wood for starting screw holes.

   

Pencils
Carpenters’ pencils have flattened sides, (to stop them rolling away), and a broad lead to give highly visible markings.

Pliers
Generally useful for holding, gripping and removing nails or other items.

 

 
   

Vice Grip
The vice grip acts as a third hand to hold items together.

   

Hacksaw
A must if your need to cut metal items. You should have a good selection of blades to fit, aimed at various types and thicknesses of metal.

 

 
   

Putty Knife
Necessary when repairing windows to apply and smooth out the putty around the new pane of glass.


Tapers Knife
Used to apply spackle to joints, for example, a gyprock wall. A 5 – 6 inch knife is a good size if you only have room for one.

 
   

Utility Knife
Use this to cut string, tape, and sharpen your pencil or used for any cutting job. A knife with replaceable blades is best.

   

Wood Chisel
Ideally you will have various sizes of wood chisels in your toolbox, but a good compromise is a 1-inch wide chisel. Make sure it’s kept sharp!

 

   

Measuring Tape
Most traditional carpenters would opt for a folding ruler, but a good quality 25-foot measuring tape with imperial and metric markings will do nicely.

Spirit Level
Nothing looks worse than a set of drunken shelves. Use a good quality spirit level which is at least 24 inches long to keep things horizontal and vertical.


 
   

Small square
A square makes sure that all your cuts are made at right angles, essential for good carpentry.

   

Combination electric drill/screwdriver
A variable speed drill is best, with a chuck capacity of at least 3/8 inch.

   

Set of drill bits/screw bits
As with the hand screwdrivers, go for a good assortment of normal, cross-headed and torx bits of various sizes.


Greg

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #12 on: March 05, 2014, 09:11:17 PM »
A standard corded drill cannot be used to drive screws.. the reason being is when you pull the trigger the drill will go up to a set speed and  you let go of the trigger the drill will continue to rotate and then slow down. This is USELESS for driving screws... Its also the cheapest. Great for drilling holes but not for driving screws.

A "cordless drill" really a battery driven screwdriver which also good at drilling holes. In this case the torque/speed of the chuck is dependent an how far you pull the trigger. The chuck will also immediately stop rotating when you release the trigger. This is exactly what you want for driving screws and it will drill holes well too.

Frankh read my mind.  This is why most drills make terrible screwdrivers.  Almost an automatic screw head stripper.  My Makita cordless drill and impact driver do the stop-when-the-trigger-is-released thing.  Very important. 

When I'm doing some projects it's also really great to be able to drop one tool and grab the other when switching from drilling and driving, although there are great bits out there that have a reversible bit; one end is a drill with countersink and the other is the driver bit of your choice. 

unpolloloco

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #13 on: March 06, 2014, 11:38:57 AM »
If it was me, I'd just get this one:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Ryobi-18-Volt-Lithium-Drill-Kit-P828/204321535?N=5yc1vZc298Z1awZ1z0ulnw#specifications

Should be good enough for pretty much anything you'll need (I have one from a larger set and it's more powerful than my corded drill...)

GuitarStv

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #14 on: March 06, 2014, 12:02:06 PM »
To weigh in on the corded/cordless drill argument . . . for years I used a heavy corded Black and Decker hand me down drill to do drilling and screw driving.  It sucked, but I got used to it and was relatively happy.  Half way through refinishing my basement the motor in this 30 year old drill blew and I picked up a Bosch lithium ion cordless drill on sale.  This little drill is better to use in every way.  It saved me huge amounts of time when hanging drywall over my head, saved me lots of headaches because when you stop pulling the trigger the chuck immediately stops rotating (so you're not punching through sheets of drywall as much), has variable speed for drilling vs screw driving, has a soft start, is light weight, has more torque, is more comfortable to hold . . .

Basically I use this drill for everything in the house that I used to use a screw driver for.  It's fantastic, quick, and a time saver every time that I use it.  We have baby stuff where the batteries are screwed in for some reason, and even for a simple task like that it's much less frustrating to use this drill than turn my screwdriver 1000 times.  In my opinion, buying a corded drill is a penny-pinching move that's not worth the couple bucks you save if you do or are planning to do any kind of renovations around the house.

phred

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #15 on: March 06, 2014, 12:17:59 PM »
The OP seems to have little tool use experience, and just wants to hang a toilet paper holder.  She does not need a 3/8 drive hammer/driver.  She does not need a $100 Bosch drill to drill two holes.  What she might consider is borrowing a drill from a neighbor.  Said neighbor might even drill the holes for her.

GuitarStv

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #16 on: March 06, 2014, 01:17:18 PM »
Fair enough.

Having a couple decent tools makes doing tasks in the future a whole lot easier though.

Exflyboy

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #17 on: March 06, 2014, 01:32:16 PM »
Yes I think we were going down the path of suggesting what a decent tool investment might be.. I.e start out right and DIY life will be much easier for years to come..:)

Frank

sleepyguy

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #18 on: March 06, 2014, 02:57:18 PM »
Personally I don't like buying used tools... I buy clearance or tools or last years models (how much and a power drill REALLY change?)  My list below, IF you are going to be doing some remodelling.

- chop saw
- hammer
- cordless drill
- sawzall
- small sledge hammer
- good tape measure
- compressor with finishing and nail gun
- multiple lengths of levellers

now if you start to go into electricity or low voltage stuff... and plumbing... you're going to need a whole new set of tools as well.

But the top stuff I mentioned you can probably do some decent work with.  You'll need a table saw if you decide to do flooring.

Mori

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #19 on: March 06, 2014, 03:06:15 PM »
Yes, I believe there was an assumption (...I know...) that the OP would eventually move on to slightly more difficult tasks--so I recommended going out and trying things. A middle-of-the road sort of drill will do more (and last a bit longer) for comparatively less than a really cheap one.

My first drill (a Milwaukee like this one-- http://www.amazon.com/Milwaukee-2407-22-M12-Drill-Driver/dp/B00ELQYCUI/ref=sr_1_9?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1394143255&sr=1-9&keywords=Milwaukee+M12 ) that I got for ~$70 on sale new worked for pretty much everything except the 4 in deck screws I tried for my gardening beds. The battery drained about every 3 screws before I gave up.

I think something like that could be found for relatively cheap used (or on sale new) and would be versatile enough to do things like curtains, toilet paper rolls, setting shelves, minor furniture repairs, etc.

One thing that hasn't been mentioned that I found out later--some drills only take hex-shaped bits (the hex is on the base of whatever bit you are using). While this isn't necessarily bad, I've found that the hex-shaped bits in my area tend to be more expensive than the traditional bit. Something to keep in mind when you are looking around.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2014, 03:08:51 PM by Mori »

thurston howell iv

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #20 on: March 06, 2014, 06:29:17 PM »
Finally, a question I can answer!  :D

First of all most tools you can buy used but a pawn shop will overcharge you. Garage sales are fine. Harbor Freight is your friend. You can get some cheap sockets, hammer, saw, wrench, plier, drill bits, etc. (all the stuff that Luigi mentioned ^^^)
 They usually even give you some free screwdrivers with their sales. Register on their online sales reminders. Tons of coupons and freebies. Get a toolbox too- a junk drawer is not a place for tools.

If you're just going to have some tools around for small household jobs you don't need fancy high end stuff.

If you need a drill a cordless is very useful. I recommend 18v or bigger... The small stuff craps out too fast. DeWalt, Ryobi, Mikita- any of those are available and sometimes on sale at Home Depot or Lowes. Sometimes they are available in a kit. I got a 18v Ryobi kit that had a small circular saw, a drill, a flashlight, a sawzall, and a miter saw... Great stuff!

A corded drill - I have one for mixing tile mortar. DeWalt is the way to go. Usually, not terribly necessary for simple home repairs.

That should get you started...

Ashcons

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #21 on: March 07, 2014, 08:56:59 AM »
I will give you a VERY specific recommendation for your question about a drill: Lowes has the Bosch DDBB180-02 on sale right now for $99. It's an 18v cordless drill/driver that comes with 2 batteries (they'll be either 1.3mAh or 1.5mAh). The retail price on two battery packs is $99.

I own the next model up (same batteries, though - 1.3mAh for mine) and built a 6x8 chicken coop with plenty of 3" screws in 3-4 charges and was never waiting on a battery to charge while I was working. It comes in a box that helps you keep the drill, charger, batteries, and a couple bits tucked away and together. Runtime tests performed by PM and other publications/blogs consistently show Bosch, Milwaukee, and Makita at the top of the cordless tool game with DeWalt occasionally taking a top 3 spot. That said, if you end up not doing much, a cheaper model and/or corded drill may be all you need. If you plan on using it more than a couple times a year or for a heavier-duty project, IMO go for this one.

In regards to building up a set of tools, it completely depends on what you are doing - tool collections seem to grow over time as you take on more projects. You could visit Harbor Freight with $50 and come out with a lot of hand tools that should work well for you as a new home owner: 1"x25' tape measure, torpedo level, claw hammer, SAE & Metric combination wrench sets, screwdriver sets, nut driver set, & an aluminum speed square. Go to Lowes/HD to get a variety of bits for your drill/driver - lots of #2 philips screwdriver heads in various lengths as well as a set of drill bits and you will be looking for projects to tackle left & right.

*edit*
Thegoblinchief's advice about not buying stuff until you need it is a good way to not waste money! If you get on Pinterest or spend time dreaming up projects, your wishlist for tools is going to explode. Actually using what you imagine you'd use (or tackling projects you'd like to) is a different ballgame. There are a lot of tools you can buy used, but battery-powered tools are an area you'd want to stick with new. It's one of those categories like razors and printers where the consumable part is where the cost comes into play, so buying an older, used NiCad 14.4v drill with no working batteries is going to be a complete waste of money and a frustrating experience.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2014, 12:42:29 PM by PDISM »

Thegoblinchief

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #22 on: March 07, 2014, 11:13:53 AM »
My main advice is to only buy stuff as you need it. I've bought way too many tools that I thought would be useful but just sit around gathering dust.

GuitarStv

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #23 on: March 07, 2014, 11:18:37 AM »
I will give you a VERY specific recommendation for your question about a drill: Lowes has the Bosch DDBB180-02 on sale right now for $99. It's an 18v cordless drill/driver that comes with 2 batteries (they'll be either 1.3mAh or 1.5mAh). The retail price on two battery packs is $99.

Yeah, that's the one that I have and it's excellent.

Frugal Ninja

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #24 on: March 07, 2014, 01:05:21 PM »
Try a local pawn shop.  If you're just looking at small tasks around the house then you don't need to worry about getting a name brand high powered one.  But I would recommend a cordless one.

If you get to the point where you need some nicer or heavier duty tools, I have found many good deals on nearly new or reconditioned tools on ebay for 50-70% of the new price. 

You can also rent tools if there's something specialized that you need and aren't likely to need repeatedly.


+1  Pawn shops are a great place to look for used tools. 

However, you may want to go in with someone that "looks" like they know about tools and have them haggle a bit for you.  Logic being, my girlfriend would pay a significantly larger amount for a tool, then I would...just as I would pay a lot less if I went in after mowing the lawn or working on the car vs going in after work in my work clothes. 

Not trying to offend anyone...but pawn shop employees are paid to buy low and sell high, and they often can measure thier profit margins based on how thier customer looks. 

ritchie70

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #25 on: March 07, 2014, 01:30:55 PM »
The OP seems to have little tool use experience, and just wants to hang a toilet paper holder.  She does not need a 3/8 drive hammer/driver.  She does not need a $100 Bosch drill to drill two holes.  What she might consider is borrowing a drill from a neighbor.  Said neighbor might even drill the holes for her.

Honestly she doesn't need a neighbor if she's mounting it on drywall. She needs some wall anchors and a screwdriver approximately the same size as the hole the wall anchor goes into.

Heresy I know, but you can easily make a hole in drywall with a screwdriver and a little turning and pushing. I've also taken a drill bit and just turned it with my fingers to make a hole in drywall. There's always the risk of hitting a stud, of course.

That said, it's nice to have tools. Personally I'd recommend a corded drill.


ritchie70

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #26 on: March 07, 2014, 01:36:52 PM »
A standard corded drill cannot be used to drive screws.. the reason being is when you pull the trigger the drill will go up to a set speed and  you let go of the trigger the drill will continue to rotate and then slow down. This is USELESS for driving screws... Its also the cheapest. Great for drilling holes but not for driving screws.

A "cordless drill" really a battery driven screwdriver which also good at drilling holes. In this case the torque/speed of the chuck is dependent an how far you pull the trigger. The chuck will also immediately stop rotating when you release the trigger. This is exactly what you want for driving screws and it will drill holes well too.

Maybe I'm having reading comprehension issues, but this is exactly backwards to my experience.

I've never used a corded drill that didn't go faster the more you pulled and slower as you released it - whether my cheap little Skil, my grandpa's 1950's Black & Decker, or my absurdly large Milwaukee hammer drill. I built an entire deck (a big one) with my Skil and grandpa's drill - one for drilling holes, one for setting screws.

The cordless screwdrivers, however, all worked like that, whether the cheap consumer ones in the 80's or my two Makitas - one dating from the 90's, one from about 5 years ago. Strictly stop or go.

MountainMan

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #27 on: March 07, 2014, 01:44:41 PM »
Ask your Facebook network if anyone has a drill or other tools you can borrow.

TomTX

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #28 on: March 08, 2014, 09:05:27 AM »
Finally, a question I can answer!  :D

First of all most tools you can buy used but a pawn shop will overcharge you. Garage sales are fine. Harbor Freight is your friend. You can get some cheap sockets, hammer, saw, wrench, plier, drill bits, etc. (all the stuff that Luigi mentioned ^^^)
 They usually even give you some free screwdrivers with their sales. Register on their online sales reminders. Tons of coupons and freebies. Get a toolbox too- a junk drawer is not a place for tools.

++ I have never seen reasonable tool prices in a pawn shop. Tools that are beat-to-hell for almost new prices. Watch for sales, particularly Harbor Freight for hand tools (and they have 20-25% coupons floating around too)

phred

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #29 on: March 08, 2014, 09:12:24 AM »
Honestly she doesn't need a neighbor if she's mounting it on drywall. She needs some wall anchors and a screwdriver approximately the same size as the hole the wall anchor goes into.
Heresy I know, but you can easily make a hole in drywall with a screwdriver and a little turning and pushing. I've also taken a drill bit and just turned it with my fingers to make a hole in drywall. There's always the risk of hitting a stud, of course.
out on several jobsites we used a tapered awl and a hammer to hammer a small hole into the drywall, pressed in the plastic anchor which was just a slight bit larger than said hole and then mounted the device.
  Having said that, I hope she is not mounting on drywall.  The chronic tugging as you mount a new roll, or even resting your arm on the fixture as you think & read, the pressing against it as you clean it is going to loosen the fixture in no time.  Then the mounting hole and the anchor  get bigger and bigger.  There are expandable metal drywall anchors; these will just delay the said problems a bit as the fixture is continually getting fiddled with instead of having no-one go near it.

ritchie70

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #30 on: March 08, 2014, 09:33:09 PM »
  Having said that, I hope she is not mounting on drywall.  The chronic tugging as you mount a new roll, or even resting your arm on the fixture as you think & read, the pressing against it as you clean it is going to loosen the fixture in no time.  Then the mounting hole and the anchor  get bigger and bigger.  There are expandable metal drywall anchors; these will just delay the said problems a bit as the fixture is continually getting fiddled with instead of having no-one go near it.
Have you tried the screw in anchors? They're rated to absurd limits, like 50 pounds, and seem incredibly solid. And no hole required. Push it in to get it started, then turn it in like a screw.

phred

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #31 on: March 09, 2014, 08:18:33 AM »
Hilti anchors?  I've used these to mount things like fire extinguisher brackets.  Since the fire extinguisher just "sits" there it's good for near forever.
The problems I've found is that with things that are continually tugged on or continually bumped the threads or ridges formed in the drywall itself gradually crumble away like flowing sand.

dcheesi

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #32 on: March 10, 2014, 11:30:03 AM »
A standard corded drill cannot be used to drive screws.. the reason being is when you pull the trigger the drill will go up to a set speed and  you let go of the trigger the drill will continue to rotate and then slow down. This is USELESS for driving screws... Its also the cheapest. Great for drilling holes but not for driving screws.

A "cordless drill" really a battery driven screwdriver which also good at drilling holes. In this case the torque/speed of the chuck is dependent an how far you pull the trigger. The chuck will also immediately stop rotating when you release the trigger. This is exactly what you want for driving screws and it will drill holes well too.

Maybe I'm having reading comprehension issues, but this is exactly backwards to my experience.

I've never used a corded drill that didn't go faster the more you pulled and slower as you released it - whether my cheap little Skil, my grandpa's 1950's Black & Decker, or my absurdly large Milwaukee hammer drill. I built an entire deck (a big one) with my Skil and grandpa's drill - one for drilling holes, one for setting screws.

The cordless screwdrivers, however, all worked like that, whether the cheap consumer ones in the 80's or my two Makitas - one dating from the 90's, one from about 5 years ago. Strictly stop or go.
My Bosch cordless drill has variable speed/power just like he described.

sleepyguy

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #33 on: March 12, 2014, 09:39:25 AM »
Depends what material you're driving into.  I only use my CORDED medium duty makita to mix compounds and drill through extremely dense woods or multiple beams stacked together a cordless would not have the driving power to do.

Cordless I can do everything else.  Deck/fence/hardi board/ 3/4 plywood (4/8) / drywall... all on a cordless.  I use use a 14.4 makita and 18v dewalt for all my projects.

Framing don't bother... get an air nailer.

A standard corded drill cannot be used to drive screws.. the reason being is when you pull the trigger the drill will go up to a set speed and  you let go of the trigger the drill will continue to rotate and then slow down. This is USELESS for driving screws... Its also the cheapest. Great for drilling holes but not for driving screws.

A "cordless drill" really a battery driven screwdriver which also good at drilling holes. In this case the torque/speed of the chuck is dependent an how far you pull the trigger. The chuck will also immediately stop rotating when you release the trigger. This is exactly what you want for driving screws and it will drill holes well too.

Frankh read my mind.  This is why most drills make terrible screwdrivers.  Almost an automatic screw head stripper.  My Makita cordless drill and impact driver do the stop-when-the-trigger-is-released thing.  Very important. 

When I'm doing some projects it's also really great to be able to drop one tool and grab the other when switching from drilling and driving, although there are great bits out there that have a reversible bit; one end is a drill with countersink and the other is the driver bit of your choice.

yogagirl95

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #34 on: March 17, 2014, 02:28:08 PM »
So now I need to install some roman shades I bought, and I still have not bought a drill. I was hoping not to spend too much.

Prairie Stash

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #35 on: March 18, 2014, 11:12:21 AM »
Get on Facebook or just phone someone, find your most handy friend. Offer them food or beer for their help. If you have terrible friends, get a friend of a friend. Ask them to kindly bring over their tools. I also offer to help my handiest friend (Journeyman Carpenter) whenever possible on his projects, its free tutorials.

In my circle of friends I specialize as the chainsaw guy (I have the best saw for borrowing, I also provide labour), we also have bike guy, survey guy, decorator etc. If you lived nearby you would probably be yoga girl, you could teach my wife while I worked on your house (or drink wine while I work...).  Sometimes DIY is best accomplished with a friend.

The thread was a ridiculously long mess of conflicting information. Good Luck.

phred

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #36 on: March 18, 2014, 01:49:04 PM »
Did the toilet paper holder ever get installed?

Installing the Roman shades in wood frames/sides really needs a drilled pilot hole; otherwise you may split the wood.  If you can't borrow a drill from work, the cheapest 1/4" drill should be fine.  I like cordless because the drill spot may be longer than the plugged in cord is long.

yogagirl95

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #37 on: April 04, 2014, 07:58:28 AM »
No It did not get it installed. But my dad is going to come over next week. I put up a temporary Redi shade on the door. It sticks on with super tape and looks good. Was only $6.

Yes the thread was a lot of conflicting information. I am slowly learning things though, a year ago I knew nothing and now I am tiling floors.

nushagak

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Re: Basic Tools
« Reply #38 on: April 22, 2014, 05:07:19 AM »
FWIW estate and garage sales are excellent places to pick up tools for a fraction of the cost. I picked up an old Craftsman (read: American made) ratchet and 20 pc socket set this weekend for $5 at an estate sale. Replacement cost on that is easily $50+ new at a store.

And old tools last forever with proper care.

Scour Craigslist on a Thursday or Friday for the estate & garage sales in your area this weekend - look for ones that mention "tools".