Author Topic: Thermostat Question  (Read 3300 times)

remaofaes

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Thermostat Question
« on: March 27, 2015, 04:45:12 PM »
I just bought a 1947 House and will be getting the asbestos covered original ductwork removed from the attic by an asbestos abatement team, and then the next day a HVAC guy will be rebuilding the ductwork for me.
The HVAC guy that I think I'm going with came to do an estimate for me and remarked that the house has an old mercury thermostat and that I probably want to upgrade it. I hadn't thought about it earlier but now I've been researching it and am not sure what is best for me.
In his quote the HVAC guy wrote:
"Install new VisionPro 5000 thermostat which also includes fan setting on/off circulate = $169.00"
He was saying that because I don't have AC in the house that the fan settling would be nice for me in the hotter months.
So, basically I have a few questions:

Any help would be appreciated as I'm a first time homeowner and a little out of my league on this.  Thanks!!
« Last Edit: March 27, 2015, 04:48:12 PM by remaofaes »

Le Poisson

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Re: Thermostat Question
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2015, 05:50:07 PM »
Tell him you don't want to replace it.

Wait until summer to decide whether its worth it to run the fan all the time. You may find that the house that has been fine without a furnace fan since 1947 will continue to be fine without a fan running. I mean, this is purely speculation, but if it was unbearable, someone in the last 70 years might have put a fan switch in. If it is indeed unbearable, you can easily DIY a thermostat. The instructions are in the package it comes with. At worst, you'll have to run a 4-lead wire from the furnace to the thermostat.

Running the fan will circulate the air better, but may not appreciably contribute to comfort.  If you have a dehumidifier on your furnace, you will need to run the fan.

Also, the extra wear from running the fan all the time will mean your furnace fan will need replacing sooner.

Fi(re) on the Farm

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Re: Thermostat Question
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2015, 06:15:54 PM »
Don't let the contractor install it, their markup is 100%. We never use the fan on the furnace, just not efficient. We use ceiling and window fans instead. Go to the big box store and buy a programmable thermostats. They're really easy to install. Even if you only set it to go down at night it will save you money.

math-ya

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Re: Thermostat Question
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2015, 06:48:55 PM »
A thermostat is a total diy fix. It's 2 wires and takes 10 minutes. Shouldn't cost more than $20. Consult YouTube if you have questions
You are going to want to replace it because the new digital ones are more precise and efficient than the old Mercury ones.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2015, 06:50:29 PM by math-ya »

Spork

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Re: Thermostat Question
« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2015, 08:35:34 PM »
Agree that thermostat is total DIY.  Low voltage and simple. 

Most thermostats I have seen --even the cheap ones-- have a fan only setting.  We do use ours to circulate wood stove warmth in the winter.

Beardog

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Re: Thermostat Question
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2015, 09:58:32 AM »
In the great state of Massachusetts you can get an energy audit in which they will give you new thermostats with a thermostat on/off switch for free!  They will also give you free energy efficient fluorescent light bulbs, nice low flow shower heads, and aerators for your sinks.

We also got a huge rebate on insulating our house.  Maybe your state has a similar program?

http://www.masssave.com/residential/home-energy-assessments

remaofaes

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Re: Thermostat Question
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2015, 01:11:58 PM »
Thanks for all the advice!!
So, sounds like I shouldn't have a prob replacing myself, but should I definitely replace?
I'll have irregular hour out of the house, so i don't know if a programmable thermostat will benefit me too much. I've also heard a minority of people say that the old mercury ones work great, are reliable, and don't require batteries. Plus the round T87 looks kinda "era correct" in my 1947 bungalow. But, i want to do the best thing for saving resources and money....

Spork

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Re: Thermostat Question
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2015, 01:20:34 PM »
Thanks for all the advice!!
So, sounds like I shouldn't have a prob replacing myself, but should I definitely replace?
I'll have irregular hour out of the house, so i don't know if a programmable thermostat will benefit me too much. I've also heard a minority of people say that the old mercury ones work great, are reliable, and don't require batteries. Plus the round T87 looks kinda "era correct" in my 1947 bungalow. But, i want to do the best thing for saving resources and money....

I don't think there's anything wrong with the old style thermostats.  I personally think the nest-type programmables are way overkill.  And if you don't have a set schedule, you might just stick with what you have.  The only benefit you might have is "sleeping temp" vs "awake temp" ... If you can cut back when you're sleeping, you might have a slight benefit there.  (But you could also just adjust it before you go to bed and when you wake up.)

math-ya

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Re: Thermostat Question
« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2015, 01:34:58 PM »
the old mercury ones work, but a new digital one is going to be much more accurate. its def going to save you money. just do it. theres a million different styles, so im sure you can find one you like

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Thermostat Question
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2015, 07:34:01 PM »
I don't think there's anything wrong with the old style thermostats.  I personally think the nest-type programmables are way overkill.  And if you don't have a set schedule, you might just stick with what you have.  The only benefit you might have is "sleeping temp" vs "awake temp" ... If you can cut back when you're sleeping, you might have a slight benefit there.  (But you could also just adjust it before you go to bed and when you wake up.)
This exactly matches our experience.  Although our thermostat supports four different time periods each day (night, morning before you go to work, daytime while you're out, evening), we only use two--night and day.  And we only really use that feature in the winter.