Author Topic: Stovetop tea kettle gives water strong metallic taste  (Read 391 times)

BZB

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Stovetop tea kettle gives water strong metallic taste
« on: January 31, 2021, 07:21:49 AM »
My KitchenAid stovetop tea kettle had a layer of mineral build up inside after 3 years of frequent use. Cleaning with vinegar didn't work, so I followed the instructions on the CLR bottle to remove the build up. Now, after using the CLR, it has a strong metallic smell, and gives the water a metallic taste. It looks clean inside, and I have washed and rinsed it dozens of times, even boiled it once with baking soda water but it didn't make a difference. Any ideas to salvage it before I give up and buy a new one?

iheartcharts

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Re: Stovetop tea kettle gives water strong metallic taste
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2021, 07:45:57 AM »
Hey! You've tried most of my go-to methods already. As you're considering a replacement, I've had good success with a simple borosilicate glass version of the kettle.

Dave1442397

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Re: Stovetop tea kettle gives water strong metallic taste
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2021, 11:38:27 AM »
I was getting that metallic taste from my tea and solved it by using filtered water. The kettle is plastic - only the heating element is metal.

BudgetSlasher

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Re: Stovetop tea kettle gives water strong metallic taste
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2021, 06:16:03 AM »
Before buying a new kettle try boiling your water in another vessel, say a pot or pan ideally made out of the same metal and in the same condition. Check to see if the taste is the same or different.

Judging by the scale you probably have hard water and if it is city water likely chlorinated too.

I am wondering if there is a chemical reaction between the metal of the kettle and the chlorine/hard water minerals that was effectively blocked by the scale.

BZB

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Re: Stovetop tea kettle gives water strong metallic taste
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2021, 08:48:21 AM »
Thanks for the replies! I usually just boiled tap water and didn't have this problem until I descaled the kettle. I think @BudgetSlasher is probably right and there's a chemical reaction going on now that I've removed the mineral deposit. I noticed it's fizzing when I boil the water. We have highly chlorinated water. I like the idea of a borosilicate glass kettle but there's a high chance I will be using an induction stovetop in the near future, so I will find something compatible. I'll use filtered water going forward and hopefully prevent the problem altogether.

Ripple4

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Re: Stovetop tea kettle gives water strong metallic taste
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2021, 08:49:57 AM »
It might be the case that the stainless steel, I assume this is stainless steel kettle, lost its passivization layer and has not had time to reform it, or it reformed unevenly. This is layer is needed or the stainless steel could rust/leach free iron into the water. the best method would be citric acid passivization, and lemon juice should get you there.

BudgetSlasher

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Re: Stovetop tea kettle gives water strong metallic taste
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2021, 08:04:28 PM »
Thanks for the replies! I usually just boiled tap water and didn't have this problem until I descaled the kettle. I think @BudgetSlasher is probably right and there's a chemical reaction going on now that I've removed the mineral deposit. I noticed it's fizzing when I boil the water. We have highly chlorinated water. I like the idea of a borosilicate glass kettle but there's a high chance I will be using an induction stovetop in the near future, so I will find something compatible. I'll use filtered water going forward and hopefully prevent the problem altogether.

With regard to induction, they made pads that you can put on the stove and under non-magnetic cookware to heat it much like a regular stove.