Author Topic: Sealing pulleys in double hung windows  (Read 898 times)

jpdx

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Sealing pulleys in double hung windows
« on: December 26, 2021, 05:33:43 PM »
My old double hung windows are drafty through the pulley openings. I found these covers for sale that should take care of the issue, but they're kind of pricy and don't seem to be widely available. Are there any other solutions out there?
« Last Edit: December 27, 2021, 11:16:13 AM by jpdx »

moneypitfeeder

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Re: Sealing pulleys in double hung windows
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2021, 07:59:43 PM »
Your link for the covers isn't working but you might also want to consider interior storms like: https://www.motherearthnews.com/diy/interior-storm-windows-zmaz10onzraw/ or https://thecraftsmanblog.com/how-to-build-interior-storm-windows/.

jpdx

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Re: Sealing pulleys in double hung windows
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2021, 11:45:31 AM »
Thanks for catching the broken link -- it's now fixed.

I like the idea of interior storm windows, because it would seal out all the drafts and maybe alleviate my winter condensation issues. But for the whole house, DIY would be too much work, and purchasing Indow windows would cost around $2000 $4000. I may decide in the future to replace all the windows anyway.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2021, 10:47:06 AM by jpdx »

affordablehousing

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Re: Sealing pulleys in double hung windows
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2021, 09:11:45 PM »
less than a dollar per cover. how is that too expensive?

jpdx

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Re: Sealing pulleys in double hung windows
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2021, 10:19:24 AM »
Well, I am frugal. :) I have 13 windows to cover, with shipping it works out to $39.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2021, 10:21:27 AM by jpdx »

Sibley

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Re: Sealing pulleys in double hung windows
« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2021, 10:37:16 AM »
I'm just gonna copy and paste the comment I wrote on reddit earlier this morning, specifically responding to someone asking why lots of people say not to replace original wood windows.


Because properly maintained and cared for with the addition of storm windows, original wood windows look better, last longer, and are just about as efficient as modern double paned windows. The key is properly maintained, and most people don't put the effort or money into that. As you have evidence of currently.

If your vinyl or aluminum window breaks, there's generally no fixing it. Wood windows you can rebuild. And the fancy doubled panes are great, up until the point when the seal breaks. And they do break. Plus the environment concerns around disposing of the modern windows.

Rebuilding, glazing, and painting wood windows are all diy-able. Some things are higher skill than others of course, but you can learn.

If your windows are too far gone, you can buy new wood windows, but they are expensive. You can also get windows that were pulled out of older homes, fix them up and install them. However, you need to commit to the maintenance or you're just pouring money down the drain.

affordablehousing

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Re: Sealing pulleys in double hung windows
« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2021, 10:48:01 AM »
I just can't think of how to cover a specific shaped hole and still allow operation of a pulley for less than 92 cents. I thought I was cheap but Geez! A new window runs $600. You should have a defibrillator on standby when you have to do any real projects.

Sibley

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Re: Sealing pulleys in double hung windows
« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2021, 04:22:23 PM »
I just can't think of how to cover a specific shaped hole and still allow operation of a pulley for less than 92 cents. I thought I was cheap but Geez! A new window runs $600. You should have a defibrillator on standby when you have to do any real projects.

I know, right? I'm looking forward to the posts of OP freaking out because of the big plumbing bill or whatever. If I can solve a problem with a dollar, I'm happy and I'm not arguing with it. (So says the person who's planning the downstairs bathroom remodel which will also incorporate hopefully replumbing both bathrooms, I'm tentatively budgeting $5k right now but am early in the planning, so will )

jpdx

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Re: Sealing pulleys in double hung windows
« Reply #8 on: December 29, 2021, 11:00:38 AM »
I know you guys are just kidding with me, but I've done extensive, nonstop work on my house. Plumbing bill? I'm the one who plumbs. :)

I think the price for the item is perfectly reasonable, but I've become so accustomed to free shipping that I don't love the $12 shipping cost. The reason for this post is to see if these covers are the best option out there, or perhaps there is something better?
« Last Edit: December 29, 2021, 01:22:50 PM by jpdx »

Paper Chaser

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Re: Sealing pulleys in double hung windows
« Reply #9 on: December 29, 2021, 12:25:38 PM »
How much energy loss has leaked out of your windows in the time that you'll spend trying to save a couple cents per cover? What's the dollar value on that?

sonofsven

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Re: Sealing pulleys in double hung windows
« Reply #10 on: December 29, 2021, 07:20:42 PM »
I've worked on numerous wood window sash over the years but I've never installed covers.
They look like they could work, in theory, to limit some air movement, but if you're getting s lot of air movement I'd look to the exterior also for gaps where the casings meet the siding, the sill, and the window frame.
Also, cold air could be getting into the stud cavity and into the boxed area where the weights are from underneath, maybe from the crawl space or basement, or gaps at the bottom of the siding.
Especially if the house is balloon framed.

jpdx

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Re: Sealing pulleys in double hung windows
« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2021, 10:43:31 AM »
Thank you, sonofsven, that is helpful advice. I recently caulked where the siding meets the exterior window casings. This being an old house, under the siding the sheathing is dimensional boards and there is no modern house wrap (I think there is tar paper). So it seems there are plenty of opportunities for air infiltration. I have air sealed the attic penetrations and rim joists.

If I want to explore this further, I suppose I could do a DIY blower-door test and see which pulley holes are leaky. So far, I've just been placing my hand over the holes on a cold day and saying "I think I feel a draft."

sonofsven

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Re: Sealing pulleys in double hung windows
« Reply #12 on: December 30, 2021, 10:51:40 AM »
Check under the sill, too, on the exterior. If the apron is applied over the siding (this is the small trim piece under the sill) you might remove it carefully and check for gaps where the siding meets the underside of the sill.

wjquigs

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Re: Sealing pulleys in double hung windows
« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2022, 06:47:04 PM »
I bought some pulley covers, installed a few, and got lazy...then I bought Dap Seal n Peel caulk. It's expensive, but you can seal the entire window, not just those pulley openings. In the spring you peel it off (and hopefully it doesn't take too much paint with it). Works great.
William

affordablehousing

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Re: Sealing pulleys in double hung windows
« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2022, 10:08:37 AM »
Just some advice on these old homes, the more you air seal, the more you invite moisture issues that are waaaaaaay more $$$ then some lost heat. Remember, "if it doesn't dry it will die." Be careful getting caulk/foam/sealant crazy you're going to end up rotting your house down. When you're ready to do a real renovation, rip all the siding off and tear out all the windows, that's the time to insulate, seal, flash and waterproof the house.