Author Topic: Fixing power window on Honda CR-V  (Read 4607 times)

Hamster

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Fixing power window on Honda CR-V
« on: August 18, 2015, 10:16:59 PM »
hey all,

I recently got back from my 6 month pretirement abroad. We parked my 2008 Honda CR-V while we were gone, and since we got home the driver's power window doesn't move.

All the other windows work normally. Also, when I press the switch for the driver' window, I hear a mechanical click at the switch, so it sounds like the electricity is activating something at the level of the switch. The window doesn't move at all though and there is no motor noise, and not even a hint of the window trying to move (it doesn't seem like the glass is just stuck to the seal). I know pretty much nothing about power windows, but I suspect the motor may be dead?

So, my question is... Does that sound like the likely diagnosis? Or is there another simple way for someone like me with basic DIY skills to diagnose the problem? If it is the motor, does anyone know how easy it is to remove the door panel, swap out the motor, and replace the panel without snapping any little plastic parts and creating more problems than I solve? Best place to go for a how to guide?

Thanks for any and all help.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2015, 11:19:52 PM by Hamster »

MrMoneyMaxwell

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Re: Fixing power window on Honda CR-V
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2015, 06:30:55 AM »
The door panel should be fairly easy to remove. It's basically just a snap/screw system. If it is the motor it is going to be much more expensive than replacing the switch.

sabertooth3

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Re: Fixing power window on Honda CR-V
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2015, 07:03:32 AM »
Here's a video I found for a 98-02 Accord, so not sure how applicable it would be for your CR-V: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aI1WhwMJYnQ

I know this could be considered heresy here, but I would take it to your mechanic (whom you presumably trust). I had that issue on my Accord rear passenger window, and it was like $50-75 to fix. It's really not that expensive and it's better than futzing with the window regulator, which costs between $40-70 on its own.

You gotta know your limits on DIY, and for me, anything past routine maintenance or common issues fall under that category. Just my 2 coppers.

Kroaler

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Re: Fixing power window on Honda CR-V
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2015, 07:04:38 AM »
I don't own a crv,  but I find it HIGHLY unlikely that the motor just died especially on a 2008 Honda.  I would check other things first.    Was the vehicle parked in a high moisture area?  Window left cracked open? I wanna rule that stuff out first.    As far as advice,  I would get on a Honda forum, there are so many and those guys have done every job on a Honda you can think of.

With all that being said I enjoy diagnosing car issues, if this were my car here's what I would do first.
1.). Try the other windows, do they work at full speed?
2.) Next I would press the button,   when I press the button, do I feel a mechanical "click" when I press the button?
3.) When I feel that "click" I should hear another click sound at another part of the car. That is the relay. If I don't hear the relay click I get suspicious.
4.) If I hear the  relay click,  do I hear a humming noise from the motor like its stuck? If I touch my hand to the window glass while pressing the open button, do I feel any vibration or anything I don't feel when the button isn't prezsed.


Wish i could help more,  I don't own a crv so this information. Could be completely inaccurate. If you have a volt meter and know how to check it,   the first place I would check is the driver window relay while someone presses the button.  This will tell you if your problem is between the button and the relay, or the relay to the motor.      Or some other weird place I didn't think of.

I can check this throughout the day, keep us updated about what test your perform and if you make any new discoveries.

Hamster

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Re: Fixing power window on Honda CR-V
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2015, 11:34:04 AM »
...
With all that being said I enjoy diagnosing car issues, if this were my car here's what I would do first.
1.). Try the other windows, do they work at full speed?
2.) Next I would press the button,   when I press the button, do I feel a mechanical "click" when I press the button?
3.) When I feel that "click" I should hear another click sound at another part of the car. That is the relay. If I don't hear the relay click I get suspicious.
4.) If I hear the  relay click,  do I hear a humming noise from the motor like its stuck? If I touch my hand to the window glass while pressing the open button, do I feel any vibration or anything I don't feel when the button isn't prezsed.
...
Thanks for the replies so far.

1) all other windows are normally functioning. I can activate all of them from the switches in the driver's door.
2) there is a click at the level of the button. Seems like the electricity is 'activating' something at the level of the switch.
3) I don't hear anything like that, but I also don't hear that with any of the other windows.
I will get online. My library has free online access to car repair guides, like Chilton's,  so I will check out the wiring diagram and try to locate the relay and put a stethoscope on it if I need to!
4) the motor doesn't make any noise, and there is no sensation that the motor is activated - the glass doesn't seem to be pulling at the window seal, like it has in the winters when the windows are frozen shut. I am pretty sure that either no signal is reaching the motor, or the motor is simply dead, based on the above.

I did see one video where an older CR-V had the window motor fill with rust and give out. Since I had it stored outdoors for 6 months, I was thinking something like that may have happened as well.

I have done some minor electrical work-installing wiring harness for a towing hitch, and everything was pretty modular - way better on my Honda than my Kia, so I was hoping the power window parts are equally easy swaps once I get into the door panel. I just don't want to snap off a plastic tab and have a rattling door panel for ever because I do something wrong.

I also just realized that my power locks are under a voluntary recall, which I have ignored til now. I could take it in to get the locks switched out. Not sure if they take the door panel off for that... But maybe would save me a little if they are already in there.

It may be next week before I actually get to fixing it with my pre-ER-work-schedule and a backpacking trip this weekend. I will keep you updated, and if anyone else has ideas, please share.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2015, 11:35:36 AM by Hamster »

Kroaler

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Re: Fixing power window on Honda CR-V
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2015, 02:59:07 PM »
Sounds like you got a solid game plan. A quick google search says the left front window relay is in the relay box, I imagine its in the front relay/ fuse box under the hood, but it could be in the one inside the car (less likely).   My In laws have a 2009 CRV, I will be over there in the next 3 days. I will look at theirs so I can speak with some authority on the subject and not just general speculation based on most cars.

Again if you find that relay, process of elimination tells you so much. If it doesn't click, the problem is, like you said, somewhere in your control circuit between the button and the relay.  If it does click and the window doesn't move, the problem is between the relay and the motor in the power side of the circuit. 

If you have a multimeter, I can walk you through where to place the leads and what reading you should see, and what those readings indicate.

As far as the button recall, perhaps the body control module or something has a recall, and that affects other buttons other then the locks.  I personally try and troubleshoot issues before I go in a shop.    If the recall fixes your problem, bam thats great,    but if you troubleshoot it and find the problem isn't something that the recall will fix, you can negotiate a discounted labor rate for the job you need done because they will most likely already be in there with certain parts disassembled.