Author Topic: Suggestions for supplies - ceiling repairs  (Read 1549 times)

mattytee

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Suggestions for supplies - ceiling repairs
« on: September 28, 2015, 12:10:25 PM »
Hi all,

Longtime lurker, not much of a poster -- but I have a question I'm sure some home-improvement-savvy mustachian can help with.

I recently had my roof replaced, and in the process, some water-damaged decking had to be replaced. What I want to know now is, what products should I use to do the interior ceiling? Specifically, I would like to fill in some gap areas. I'm thinking some kind of caulking or silicon? I would also like to fill in the visible lines between the existing ceiling pieces, if possible.

What I plan after filling in the gaps is a coat or two of the oil-based Kilz to cover any leftover water marks (roof was leaking) and then interior paint to cover that.

Please let me know what product(s) I should be using, any tips are also highly appreciated. I've done paint and ceramic floor tile in the past, but nothing like this.

Thanks,
Matt

velocistar237

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Re: Suggestions for supplies - ceiling repairs
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2015, 01:38:38 PM »
Here's an idea for others to throw darts at:

Coat of Kilz to seal
Paper joint tape bedded in thin coat of joint compound for seams
Skim-coat over the whole thing with joint compound several coats, sanding between coats, with a sanding block for the corners
Good primer, Kilz is fine for this, too
Paint

This will produce a smooth surface. Is there texturing on the existing ceiling? If so, that might be a pain to match.

If you don't care about appearance, you can try just caulking and painting. The plywood pattern might be visible, and caulk might not hide the flat joint very well.

Why plywood instead of drywall?

mattytee

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Re: Suggestions for supplies - ceiling repairs
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2015, 01:48:50 PM »
It's not clear, but the decking actually is the ceiling (flat roof in Santa Fe, NM). The existing ceiling isn't drywall either, it's about a four inch thick fiber board material that takes on the role of both decking and insulation.

Where the roofers did the new decking, they added insulation above the plywood. The fiber board material had gotten wet in those spots. I haven't seen anything like it before, it reminds me of the particle board stuff chalkboards used to be backed with... Much finer fibers than particle board.

velocistar237

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Re: Suggestions for supplies - ceiling repairs
« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2015, 02:18:14 PM »
The word homasote comes to mind. Your local home improvement store might have something similar.

If you can't remove the plywood and install a similar board material, and you do actually care about matching the existing ceiling, you could find a wallpaper with a similar texture, install it so it extends over the flat seam, and paint over it.

mattytee

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Re: Suggestions for supplies - ceiling repairs
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2015, 06:07:07 PM »
The existing stuff is not textured, just painted. I think as long as everything is the same color, it will look fine.

So, if I understand correctly, I can just patch the gaps with joint compound and bed paper tape where needed? Do I need to prime first, or will the compound adhere to the plywood?

velocistar237

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Re: Suggestions for supplies - ceiling repairs
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2015, 07:05:30 AM »
So, if I understand correctly, I can just patch the gaps with joint compound and bed paper tape where needed? Do I need to prime first, or will the compound adhere to the plywood?

I think yes, it will stick to plywood. Joint compound contains a bonding agent. If you want, prime first and see if it's good enough, then skim coat if not. I like to use the setting-type joint compound, but the pre-mixed is easier.

This is one of those things where asking 4 contractors will get you 5 answers. Here's an example. One guy in that thread mentions liner paper, which might be an easier approach.