Author Topic: DIY Furnace Air Filter  (Read 3010 times)

supomglol

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DIY Furnace Air Filter
« on: January 18, 2016, 08:36:45 AM »
Has anyone built their own air filters for furnaces? 
As we purchase more and more rental houses; we continue to accumulate a growing number of furnace air filters of different sizes.  To save money, we try to purchase these in bulk, which then forces us to store all of these different-sized filers for extended periods of time. 

My thought is, all of these filters serve the same purpose; and are made of the same material.  Could I just make them myself each time to the specific dimension of the house needing a replacement?  Perhaps buying the components in bulk might be cheaper and save on shipping costs. 

I was thinking maybe building a wood/metal frame with some kind of clips or re-usable attaching mechanism to attach the filter material.  When its time to change you just un-clip the dirty fliter, cut a new piece of matching size; re-clip and you're done.  After the initial build you would only have to bring the roll of filter material and a pair of scissors. 

Suggestions? 

GuitarStv

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Re: DIY Furnace Air Filter
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2016, 09:17:36 AM »
Seems like a lot of work for little benefit.  You can purchase washable furnace filters for very little money, and then just rinse them out with water every couple months.

Agg97

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Re: DIY Furnace Air Filter
« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2016, 10:30:09 AM »
YES!  It's not hard at all.  Just cut a piece of hardware cloth to use as a backer for your filter.  Then, cut roll filter media to size.  You can buy the roll media in varying widths, so get the one that is the most common size for your houses.

Hardware cloth:  http://www.homedepot.com/p/HDX-1-4-in-x-2-ft-x-5-ft-Hardware-Cloth-308231HD/204331884
Roll Media:  http://www.amazon.com/Filtration-Group-78834-Spray-Bonded-High-Lofted/dp/B00BAR158I

Agg97

Edit:  As a bonus, you get MERV 8-rated filters which is better than average for residential. 
« Last Edit: January 18, 2016, 02:43:23 PM by Agg97 »

Papa bear

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Re: DIY Furnace Air Filter
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2016, 10:38:48 AM »
I leave extra filters at the rental house, hoping that maybe the tenant might see it and replace it.  But that never happens.  I just check them out every few months and replace if needed.  I restock when I'm low.


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lthenderson

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Re: DIY Furnace Air Filter
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2016, 01:51:40 PM »
Seems like a lot of work for little benefit.  You can purchase washable furnace filters for very little money, and then just rinse them out with water every couple months.

Ditto. I just buy a washable one that I rinse out from time to time. Then I don't have to worry about storing filters or material to make filters.

HipGnosis

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Re: DIY Furnace Air Filter
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2016, 10:03:39 AM »
Seems like a lot of work for little benefit.  You can purchase washable furnace filters for very little money, and then just rinse them out with water every couple months.
Thank you. I didn't know such a thing existed.  Sure makes sense!!

supomglol

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Re: DIY Furnace Air Filter
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2016, 05:02:47 PM »
Seems like a lot of work for little benefit.  You can purchase washable furnace filters for very little money, and then just rinse them out with water every couple months.

Ditto. I just buy a washable one that I rinse out from time to time. Then I don't have to worry about storing filters or material to make filters.

First, people most people seem to misunderstand the purpose of an HVAC filter.  It is to protect your furnace from damage, not act as a whole-home air purifier like most people these days seem to think.  The more "filtering power" or higher MERV rating, the lower actual airflow through your system.  Too much and you'll take it out of the operating spec and may cause damage to the HVAC system.  You want an air purifier?  Go buy one, don't use your HVAC because it is one of the most expensive systems in your property to repair or replace

Back to washable filters, most of them are a joke, anything claiming to be both electrostatic and washable simply... cannot be, from my understanding. 
Relating to the situation at hand; I would rather "dispose" of a rental property's filter rather than attempt to clean it.