Author Topic: Bronze Weatherstripping  (Read 2906 times)

Deano

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Bronze Weatherstripping
« on: August 15, 2013, 09:10:33 AM »
I've recently been doing a complete refurb on my old sash windows and I'm wondering if a bronze or brass weatherstripping is the way to go. Anyone have experience in this area? I'm thinking sprung as V-stripping is hard to find and I've heard it's prone to breaking. Any tips or advice would be appreciated!

Dynasty

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Re: Bronze Weatherstripping
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2013, 03:09:09 PM »
I've re-done a handful of mine, and have used no weatherstripping. However, I have very very very little noticeable air leakage when I'm finished putting them all back together.

And what I do have I view as fresh air coming into the home.

Actually, I just installed two refurbished double hung windows yesterday evening that I finally finished.  One more window restored and ready to install tonight.


Deano

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Re: Bronze Weatherstripping
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2013, 07:22:08 PM »
Ah, cool. I have to say I have one window that seems to get more, uhm...airflow, than I want in the winter. I might try one and see how it goes, or maybe just get some heavier curtains like they did in the old days.

How much work have you had to do on your windows? How old are they? I had capping on mine, rotten underneath, some rotted sections of a few sashes, 5000 layers of paint...ugh. I have 3 more to go after this one, they'll have to wait until next year. I need to make a few storm windows to replace the wobbly aluminum ones. Tonnes of work, but they work now and the house looks much better.

Dynasty

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Re: Bronze Weatherstripping
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2013, 09:02:14 PM »
Just got the ninth double hung installed about 30 minutes ago, that I've restored.

The house is a 1912, but the windows for whatever reason were replaced sometime in the 1950s with wood ones.  So they are lacking the ropes, weights, and pulley system and instead have invisa-sash-balances...

I believe, some of the originals, made there way into the garage when it was built. And even though those are solid still, the replacement windows are way higher quality than what this house was probably built with. However, maybe the garage windows were from somewhere else and not the main house.

I've done a lot of work. Started this batch of three windows on the third of July and just wrapped up. Completely scraped and finish sanded the window sashes. Heavy application of wood resin epoxy. Oil and varnish finish for the inside. And linseed oil paint and putty for the exteriors. Restored the original hardware as best I could. Completely stripped and sanded the window frames, wood resin epoxy, oil primer and latex top coat. Its a labor of love, that's for sure. But if I were to add up all my labor and materials, I could have bought tacky vinyl windows 8 times over. However, my restored windows have another fifty years in them before they'll need any major work. Plus, they are way nicer looking than anything I could ever hope to find in vinyl.

If you are interested, check into the Smith and Co. CPES (Clear penetrating epoxy). I've been using it as a pretreatment for just about any wood I'm going to finish, or refinish. Adds a lot of strength back to old dried out wood, and keeps water out. Especially important for windows.


Greg

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Re: Bronze Weatherstripping
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2013, 10:09:41 PM »
If you have the time/money/gumption, rebuilding the original windows is better than replacing. You can find original style weatherstripping like you describe if you look.  I don't know about it breaking, it's pretty durable stuff.  Requires periodic cleaning and maintenance, like waxing.  Works better and lasts longer than foam, but there are other more durable modern equivalents, like silicone rubber bulb seals.  If you can reuse the original v-seal you're better off.

About the only drawback to original wood sashes is the single-pane glass.  Sometimes if the muntins are thick enough you can replace with double glazed glass units, but not always.

Most old windows were framed on-site by master craftsman, so it's hard to match the quality and construction.

Deano

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Re: Bronze Weatherstripping
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2013, 09:46:16 PM »
My house is 1890's, so munions were out by then, technology allowed for larger pieces of glass. My impression was that yes, the original windows are single pane, but that with proper storms, you got pretty much the same performance as double paned modern windows. The wood quality is excellent as well, as it is old growth (colder climate equals denser wood) and construction is pretty fine. I used Abatron wood epox to fix up the rotten portions, worked really well. I'm happy to keep the old windows and I pretty much have to as it is a heritage district.

I love old windows...they're things of beauty!! I'm going to try the bronze weatherstripping, I've heard it has the side benefit of making the sashes open and close really smoothly.

worms

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Re: Bronze Weatherstripping
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2013, 03:10:40 AM »
Don't know about availability where you are, but there are various types of brush strip draught excluder designed with sash window refurbishment in mind.  This one is for the staff bead, but others can be routed into window or frame as required.