Author Topic: Any savvy car ppl out there? - need to get CV joint replaced... Im going DIY -  (Read 3441 times)

MrSal

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So I have a Honda Civic 2001 EX Sedan I bought 16 months ago for about 3000 dollars which was a steal in my opinion since there were no signs of rust in the car here in Central PA which seems to be a problem in most cars with this age.

Bought it with 120k miles and currently is sitting at 138k miles.

So... my car has a clicking noise when I turn both left and right on curves, especially if I go faster making the G forces higher on each side of vehicle. It seems its the CV joint according to what I researched.

While looking at videos, it does not look that hard so I was thinking of DIY even though me and cars arent that great together. Maybe its time I change that!

Since english is not my primary language all these new technical terms sometimes are chinese to me.

I was thinking of replacing the whole CV Axle since for the price it makes sense.

I went to Rockauto.com and Auto Advance parts. Advance parts says it fits my vehicle and it comes at 99 dollars for 2 CV Axles Carquest brand (no idea if it is any good)

While on rockauto page though http://www.rockauto.com/en/catalog/honda,2001,civic,1.7l+l4,1373217,drivetrain,cv+half+shaft+assembly,2288

I see many options.

It seems standard transmission is manual correct? I have automatic. Of these brands what should I go for?

And also, it seems that I cant do a left side and right side axle of the same brand with rockauto since some of them say manual transmission and then only have one side of vehicle for automatic trans.

Another question is... when replacing these, do i need to also replace wheel bearing if its in bad shape or is the wheel bearing a part of the whole axle so in essence is being replace when someone changes the axle?

Thanks

Highbeam

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Replace only the failed half shaft. Not the wheel bearing. Find the right part before you start.

zolotiyeruki

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Agreed, no need to replace the bearings. Replacing the driveaxle/half-shaft by itself. When I did it, I borrowed a slide hammer and a horseshoe - shaped attachment made to fit around the inner joint, to make it easy to pull out. Replacing the output shaft seals  at the same time might also be a good idea. They're cheap and your in there anyway, and you won't have to worry about the old seals mating with the new shafts.

MrSal

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ok gotcha... regarding brands any input?

MrSal

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i actually bought an impact wrencher from Amazon for free! :D

it was 50% off when you bought 2 items so i got 2 for 80 bucks which i sold the other one!

ill still need the socket as you mentioned ... as weel as jack stands and so forth... so i will take sometime to gather all the tools but like you said and judging from the videos... it does not look too hard

sisto

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It's really not hard. I'd also suggest buying the replacement from Napa auto as they generally have a lifetime warranty. So if you tear the boot and it goes out they will give you a new one. Good luck!

MrSal

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for a weekend warrior like me is this set worth anything?

http://www.harborfreight.com/professional-301-piece-mechanics-tool-kit-45951.html

sisto

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Honestly, you would probably be better off buying some individual items. You definitely need a good set of pliers and channel locks, a good set of screwdrivers, a hammer, a crescent wrench, and a set of metric and SAE wrenches and 3/8 drive sockets. Harbor Freight has sales often where you could pick up some of them.

MrSal

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how about this one:

http://www.lowes.com/pd/Kobalt-250-Piece-Mechanic-s-Tool-Set/4640241

I can fetch it for 35 dollars at my local Lowes due to clearance!

to be honest it would be 26 USD out of pocket due to the fact that i bought my gift cards at 25% discount!


For this price it seems a no brainer?
« Last Edit: September 19, 2016, 02:04:01 PM by MrSal »

MrSal

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regular price is 199

triangle

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Looks like you are on the right track. As far as tools, if you can buy the big set on sale then that is probably the right decision.

My only caution is if there is no price benefit you may enjoy having individual tool sets. Meaning instead of a single big American & Metric socket+wrench set, purchase an individual Metric wrench set, individual American wrench set, individual metric socket set, etc. Reason is that most of the time you are working on something that uses either all metric or all standard fastener sizes, so there is only 1/2 of weight and volume needed to carry around. Then sometimes you only need a wrench. It is so much easier to grab a roll of wrenches and a couple of screw drivers from your tool chest rather a big box of everything.

MrSal

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Looks like you are on the right track. As far as tools, if you can buy the big set on sale then that is probably the right decision.

My only caution is if there is no price benefit you may enjoy having individual tool sets. Meaning instead of a single big American & Metric socket+wrench set, purchase an individual Metric wrench set, individual American wrench set, individual metric socket set, etc. Reason is that most of the time you are working on something that uses either all metric or all standard fastener sizes, so there is only 1/2 of weight and volume needed to carry around. Then sometimes you only need a wrench. It is so much easier to grab a roll of wrenches and a couple of screw drivers from your tool chest rather a big box of everything.

Yup thanks... Do you know anything about the Kobalt one i linked? Reg price is 199 ... but i went on to my lowes webpage and as always I check the stores around the area because sometimes they have different pricing! And lo behold it was at on clearance at one particular store (20 miles away but I need to go to the town where this lowes is at anyhow on Friday).

Total cost for this set is about 26 dollars for me out of pcoket

26 dollars for a 250 piece its 10 cents per tool!!!

sisto

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Looks like you are on the right track. As far as tools, if you can buy the big set on sale then that is probably the right decision.

My only caution is if there is no price benefit you may enjoy having individual tool sets. Meaning instead of a single big American & Metric socket+wrench set, purchase an individual Metric wrench set, individual American wrench set, individual metric socket set, etc. Reason is that most of the time you are working on something that uses either all metric or all standard fastener sizes, so there is only 1/2 of weight and volume needed to carry around. Then sometimes you only need a wrench. It is so much easier to grab a roll of wrenches and a couple of screw drivers from your tool chest rather a big box of everything.
Yup thanks... Do you know anything about the Kobalt one i linked? Reg price is 199 ... but i went on to my lowes webpage and as always I check the stores around the area because sometimes they have different pricing! And lo behold it was at on clearance at one particular store (20 miles away but I need to go to the town where this lowes is at anyhow on Friday).

Total cost for this set is about 26 dollars for me out of pcoket

26 dollars for a 250 piece its 10 cents per tool!!!

Yep, I'd buy that one for sure.

MrSal

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and they have lifetime warranty so... i guess if it fails ill get a replacement.

and if i need a specialty tool i guess autozone rents them for free, autotools ... and i have one like 1 mile away

Now i just need to buy the jacks :D in order to get under the car!

sokoloff

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Now i just need to buy the jacks :D in order to get under the car!
You need to buy jackstands to get under the car. Please never get under a car supported only by a jack (or worse, by more than one jack).

You might also need to buy a jack in order to get the car up onto the jackstands, of course.

MrSal

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yes thats what i meant jackstands. :)

sisto

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Now i just need to buy the jacks :D in order to get under the car!
You need to buy jackstands to get under the car. Please never get under a car supported only by a jack (or worse, by more than one jack).

You might also need to buy a jack in order to get the car up onto the jackstands, of course.

Good point. I had assumed since he used the jacks (plural) that he really meant jack stands. Good to call this out though in case someone else uses this info.

Making Cookies

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FWIW - helper presses on the brake pedal. You remove the cotter pin (or not if the nut just has a peened edge). With the car sitting on the ground, brakes applied firmly - loosen the axle nut. Do not roll the car with this nut loosened. it can ruin the axle bearing.

Loosen the lugnuts. Lift the car with a trolley jack. Remove the wheel. Get ready to remove the balljoint from the lower control arm.

I loosen the balljoint nut but leave it on the balljoint stud to protect the threads. Jack the car up with a trolley jack. Place the car's own scissor's jack under the balljoint stud. Lower the car. If you are lucky - the balljoint stud will pop loose from the lower control arm immediately.

If not, use a ball peen hammer to tap the side of the lower control arm near where the balljoint stud passes through. This will create vibrations that will for a milisecond or so deform the hole allowing the balljoint to pop out of it's tapered hole passing through the lower control arm.  All it requires is tapping (think hammering a medium sized nail into pine) but occasionally I'll have to whack the lower control arm pretty hard with a sledge hammer. You don't want to deform or dent the control arm - just vibrate it.

Let the scissors jack back down and the car can sit on the trolley jack plus jack stand.

Now you can remove the balljoint nut, lift the strut/spindle assemblying out of the lower control arm hole. Fold it out of the way.

Using a wide flat blade screwdriver or small pry bar, pop the axle out of the transmission. Install a new axle seal. Lube the lip of the seal with oil or grease after you tap it into place.

Shove the new axle back into the transmission. It'll snap into place.

Reverse assembly. Access to a proper torque wrench would be wise.

I'd recommend changing the transmission oil (manual transmission) or fluid/filter (automatic transmission).