Author Topic: Hanging drywall for a repair job  (Read 739 times)

jeromedawg

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Hanging drywall for a repair job
« on: November 06, 2017, 10:29:08 AM »
Hey all,

Need some help/advice on the best way to cut and hang drywall for this:



Should I work in two sections for each wall? Cutting a sheet to size for the area from the line of the bottom of the electric outlet and below (on both the back and adjacent wall) and then another section for above it? How do I handle the cut-outs for the ice maker box valve and the electric outlet?

I'm having trouble determining the thickness of drywall used too... when I measure against the existing drywall, it seems some parts are 1/2" and other parts are closer to 5/8" - one contractor who came by said that the drywall looks like 5/8" - is it possible that drywall will 'compact' down from 5/8 and look like it's 1/2?

Here are some pics I took measuring various parts. Some sheets are cut into where others are not and I'm measuring the butt-end of an existing sheet.









 

jeromedawg

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Re: Hanging drywall for a repair job
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2017, 10:39:10 AM »
There's also a corner bead... I'm assuming I should just remove the nails from it, slide the drywall into place, then tap them back in probably *after* securing the drywall?





While I was at it, I found a leftover piece of 1/2" drywall I had sitting in the garage. I put in against some of the sections that were cut out in the pics, and it seemed like that was actually a best-fit. Of course, I don't have any pieces of 5/8 to compare with either. The other trick thing is the ice maker valve box - it's nailed to the firewall but the tabs to secure it to drywall seem way too close with not enough clearance to slide the drywall under. This leads to another problem - how can I possibly make a square cut-out for this part if it requires the drywall to be slide under. Wouldn't I then need to cut a lower section of drywall that I would slide up from under the box?
« Last Edit: November 06, 2017, 10:52:53 AM by jeromedawg »

kendallf

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Re: Hanging drywall for a repair job
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2017, 10:52:57 AM »
Let's see.. first, yes, you can do each wall in two pieces, with the butt edges against the wall and the tapered (smooth edged) sides making the joint.  Or, if you want to avoid a seam, they're both small enough to do vertically, it looks like.  It's easier to hang two pieces, though.  Do the upper piece first, using the full 4' height, then cut the lower piece on the bottom as needed. 

To cut out for the boxes, you can take good measurements to the sides of each and mark them out on the sheet, then cut out the hole with a knife before you hang the sheet.  The lazy man's way that most drywall guys are using these days is to roughly mark the center of each box, hold the sheet against the wall, then use a rotozip tool with a drywall bit to punch the middle of the box, then cut around the edges.

You might be able to slide a sheet behind the existing corner bead, but the usual way would be to score along it on the "good wall, remove it, and reinstall fresh corner bead.  You'd have to paint at least the edge of the adjoining wall, obviously.

Finally, the thickness of the existing drywall only matters if you need to blend a joint on a flat wall, which is not the case from the pictures you've shown.  Use 1/2", it's easier.

jeromedawg

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Re: Hanging drywall for a repair job
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2017, 11:12:39 AM »
Let's see.. first, yes, you can do each wall in two pieces, with the butt edges against the wall and the tapered (smooth edged) sides making the joint.  Or, if you want to avoid a seam, they're both small enough to do vertically, it looks like.  It's easier to hang two pieces, though.  Do the upper piece first, using the full 4' height, then cut the lower piece on the bottom as needed. 

To cut out for the boxes, you can take good measurements to the sides of each and mark them out on the sheet, then cut out the hole with a knife before you hang the sheet.  The lazy man's way that most drywall guys are using these days is to roughly mark the center of each box, hold the sheet against the wall, then use a rotozip tool with a drywall bit to punch the middle of the box, then cut around the edges.

You might be able to slide a sheet behind the existing corner bead, but the usual way would be to score along it on the "good wall, remove it, and reinstall fresh corner bead.  You'd have to paint at least the edge of the adjoining wall, obviously.

Finally, the thickness of the existing drywall only matters if you need to blend a joint on a flat wall, which is not the case from the pictures you've shown.  Use 1/2", it's easier.

Thanks! I'm probably going to have to read through this several more times to fully get it :) So I take it 1/2" for the ceiling areas should be fine too?

As far as the corner bead, one of the handymen said he'd probably want to replace that so it makes sense. I've never done that before so that'll be one more thing to look into. I'm assuming all that's needed is to nail it in place after the drywall is up? Do they sell corner beads of various length or would I likely need to buy a longer length than needed and cut it down to size?

jeromedawg

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Re: Hanging drywall for a repair job
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2017, 11:43:54 AM »
BTW: here's a picture of the ice maker valve box up close and the tabs. You can see the 4 recessed tabs that are mounted/nailed to the firewall. But if you look at the forward part of the box there are also 4 tabs (one is broken at the bottom-right) with screw/nail holes.



Presumably the drywall would sit in front of the recessed tabs but behind the front-tabs, "sandwiched" in, but I'm not 100% sure. I'd be tempted just to saw/cut off those front tabs so I can fit the drywall flush against the box and not worry about any of it (especially since it's well-secured against the firewall as is. Stupidly, I didn't think to take any pictures of the area *before* they ripped the drywall out, otherwise I'd have an idea of what it actually looked like. I want to say there was a cover or faceplate but I have no idea. If there was, I'm not sure if the contractors who did the remediation tossed it maybe because it cracked or broke into pieces? We'll see once I get the pics.


UPDATE: CRAP, I just got these images from the remediation company. Looks like there was a faceplate and they must have trashed it:





Anyone know if the newer style faceplate trims can 'retrofit' over these older style boxes?
« Last Edit: November 06, 2017, 01:05:53 PM by jeromedawg »