Author Topic: Heat acclimatization  (Read 8355 times)

igthebold

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Heat acclimatization
« on: June 26, 2012, 07:37:14 AM »
Couple of followup observations on heat acclimatization:
  • This article provides some more details: http://www.sportsci.org/encyc/heataccl/heataccl.html. You can acclimate passively, but you don't get as many benefits. Also, you can see full acclimatization in 14 days.
  • Please be careful when trying this out. I went for a 7-mile jog yesterday, and while I tried to hold back and drank a bunch of homemade gatorade, I ended up with pretty severe heat exhaustion, including high body temperature into the night and mild delirium. I feel fine now, but it's worth being careful.

velocistar237

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Re: Heat acclimatization
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2012, 08:38:00 AM »
The article says that exercise is better for heat acclimatization than is being in the heat, and that both together is even better.

Also from the article:
Quote
heat acclimatization adaptations may vanish after only a few days or weeks of inactivity (i.e., 18-28 days)

So, keep up the exercise.

kolorado

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Re: Heat acclimatization
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2012, 09:30:58 AM »
Heat exhaustion and stroke are not worth saving some money on power bills. I'm recovering from heat effects of a family outing on Sunday. Our rental has no ac. We rode out the first 98-100* heat wave here in CO because it only lasted about 3 days. The current heat wave 96-100* is still going on and will probably stretch to 10 days altogether. We took a trip up the mountains on Sunday to get out of the city heat and spent the afternoon drinking water, snacking on crackers/cake/fruit and playing in a mountain stream. I did not overexert myself at all. And yet, yesterday I was so sick I couldn't function all day, and I'm no baby! I have three kids to look after. It's extremely inconvenient for me to be that sick. Admittedly I made my condition worse by having alcohol when we got home. I didn't think it would be a problem since I'd drank over a gallon of water every day for several days. I felt fine at the time.
I should have listened to hubby when he wanted to buy a window ac. I thought if we just held out we'd acclimate and CO in general is not supposed to be this warm. Big mistake for me and this is not worth saving a couple hundred dollars.
We could cool our 800 square foot rancher in NJ with a window unit for about $3 a day(12-18 hours of use). Even so, I only ran it when the interior temperature went over 86*. Humidity on the coast during summer was always 75%+ so it felt much worse than 86*. So it ran about 30-50 days all summer(May-September).
Here in CO the humidity is very low and the temperature feels very comfortable even into the low 90*'s. Since electricity is about half the price here than we were paying in NJ, being comfortable and healthy here with occasional AC use seems like a bargain.
I know that extreme heat acclimatization is possible since my dad has been a machine operator in a glass factory for 30 years. The temps he can handle are miraculous. I'm thinking that certain people have a better aptitude for it though. With my low blood pressure and poor sweating abilities, I'm just asking for heat stroke.

igthebold

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Re: Heat acclimatization
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2012, 11:29:47 AM »
So, keep up the exercise.

Went running a little today, even though I'm slightly sick and still recovering from Monday. Went fine.. probably because it was so cool and dry :).

Heat exhaustion and stroke are not worth saving some money on power bills.

I totally agree. My plan was to do it gradually.. I just miscalculated significantly. I'm probably going to stick to doing longer runs at cooler temperatures until I become acclimated.

velocistar237

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Re: Heat acclimatization
« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2012, 08:14:33 AM »
Heat exhaustion and stroke are not worth saving some money on power bills.

If heat exhaustion and stroke are a concern, then according to the article that igthebold linked, you can still exercise in the morning or in a cool place and gain some heat adaptation, just not quite as much.

kolorado

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Re: Heat acclimatization
« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2012, 10:03:27 AM »
I've been thinking about the way I phrased my post and it sure came across as whiny. I actually believe I have acclimated as much as I'm going to and it's pretty impressive, I think. I can function in health with low-moderate exertion at up to 95* with CO humidity levels. I can do almost anything I want at 90*. It's only for days/periods of extreme heat and humidity that I need to take care for my health. Lesson learned!
My hubby works in AC some of the day and hasn't acclimated to my level because of it. If it's 90*, no matter the humidity, he is languid and sweating profusely. I have family on the coast in NJ and NC. They cannot function above 78*. You'll freeze your toes off walking into their homes. Just as we can acclimate to heat, one can acclimate to cold. I wait until winter to do that and keep the house at 60*. ;)

igthebold

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Re: Heat acclimatization
« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2012, 11:07:07 AM »
I've been thinking about the way I phrased my post and it sure came across as whiny. I actually believe I have acclimated as much as I'm going to and it's pretty impressive, I think. I can function in health with low-moderate exertion at up to 95* with CO humidity levels. I can do almost anything I want at 90*. It's only for days/periods of extreme heat and humidity that I need to take care for my health. Lesson learned!

Given the level of grumpiness I experienced while recovering from Monday's experience, I'm going to ignore any perceived whininess on your part until at least Monday. ;) But it didn't sound whiny. It just sounded like you take the issue seriously, which is good, since it's life-and-death.

But yes, I agree about the air conditioning issue. Here in NC all the shopping centers, most of the newer churches, almost all the homes, are cooled to 77-78 for frugal people and 69-70 for others. I don't really feel superior about it, but it is nice not to have to have those temps to function meaningfully.

poko

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Re: Heat acclimatization
« Reply #7 on: June 28, 2012, 10:25:45 PM »
Be careful not to go too far in the acclimatization direction! I started doing roller derby last year, and we practice in a warehouse that is not air conditioned. I'm in Texas, that means it gets very hot! Last summer we had a record string of 100+ days and going to a 2 hour practice right after work was sweltering. I acclimated for sure, but when fall rolled around, 80 degrees felt downright cold! ;)

Just yesterday I met with a former co-worker who was complaining that their A/C went out and their bedroom was a "sweltering" 80 degrees (!) -- my A/C is rarely set above 85. I have a snuggie that I keep at work to keep myself from getting too cold in the A/C, though I guess I should not use it and start "winter acclimatization", ha.

igthebold

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Re: Heat acclimatization
« Reply #8 on: June 29, 2012, 10:42:02 AM »
Tried another run today, 4 miles. So far I feel great. Either I did it more wisely, or I'm becoming acclimated, or both. Temps were 90-95F, heat index 100-105F.

Be careful not to go too far in the acclimatization direction! I started doing roller derby last year, and we practice in a warehouse that is not air conditioned. I'm in Texas, that means it gets very hot! Last summer we had a record string of 100+ days and going to a 2 hour practice right after work was sweltering. I acclimated for sure, but when fall rolled around, 80 degrees felt downright cold! ;)

Duly noted. :)

Just yesterday I met with a former co-worker who was complaining that their A/C went out and their bedroom was a "sweltering" 80 degrees (!) -- my A/C is rarely set above 85. I have a snuggie that I keep at work to keep myself from getting too cold in the A/C, though I guess I should not use it and start "winter acclimatization", ha.

How about this for an anti-mustachian response: http://raleigh.craigslist.org/for/3070501170.html

"Does your office over-air-condition? Try a space heater!" :) Oh, and when you drive, be sure to be either accelerating or braking at all times. You should exercise a ton so you can eat a ton...

arebelspy

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Re: Heat acclimatization
« Reply #9 on: June 29, 2012, 10:52:30 AM »
How about this for an anti-mustachian response: http://raleigh.craigslist.org/for/3070501170.html

"Does your office over-air-condition? Try a space heater!"

Hah.  That's some good satire.
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TLV

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Re: Heat acclimatization
« Reply #10 on: June 29, 2012, 01:22:34 PM »
When my office is too cold, I just close the door. I have enough computer equipment in there that I don't need a space heater.

grantmeaname

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Re: Heat acclimatization
« Reply #11 on: June 29, 2012, 01:39:10 PM »
Me too. My space heater says "Intel Pentium 4 3.4GHz HT" on the side of it.

igthebold

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Re: Heat acclimatization
« Reply #12 on: June 29, 2012, 03:41:16 PM »
When my office is too cold, I just close the door. I have enough computer equipment in there that I don't need a space heater.
Me too. My space heater says "Intel Pentium 4 3.4GHz HT" on the side of it.

Yeah.. I've been known to put my laptop directly on my lap when I'm cold.

PS—This is what the temps here are like today:

And this: http://www.wral.com/weather/story/11266073/

Quote from: the article
"The record high temperature caused the concrete under the asphalt to swell, and, as the concrete slabs pushed together, the asphalt roadway surface was broken apart," according to a statement from the North Carolina Department of Transportation.

arebelspy

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Re: Heat acclimatization
« Reply #13 on: June 29, 2012, 04:30:08 PM »
I don't know why people complain about Vegas heat, then I go on FB and see friends posting about how it's 101 in Chicago and go here and see it's 102+ (feels like 116!) in NC.

At least here there's almost always no humidity.
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skyrefuge

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Re: Heat acclimatization
« Reply #14 on: June 29, 2012, 04:52:58 PM »
Me too. My space heater says "Intel Pentium 4 3.4GHz HT" on the side of it.

I don't have a Kill-a-Watt meter, so I never did actual measurements, but when I replaced my P4 system with a Core i5 with on-chip graphics, I calculated that the new system might actually pay for itself in reduced electricity costs over its lifetime.  Something I'd thought about with light bulbs, but never figured would come into play for computers.  Yay Moore's Law and power-management!  Just like "ditch that incandescent/old-refrigerator!" campaigns, I almost think there should be "ditch that P4!" campaigns.

Of course I didn't factor in the associated increased central heating that would be required in my calculations!

dancedancekj

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Re: Heat acclimatization
« Reply #15 on: July 05, 2012, 12:15:22 AM »
I think I've finally gotten acclimated to the summer heat. I am absolutely fine at 88 degrees in doors with 70% humidity with a fan focused on me and not moving around too much. I can work outside in the heat without too much issue for the most part, and the humidity and heat doesn't seem to bother me as much as it did a couple weeks ago. I still feel hot but it just doesn't... bother me, like it did before. I know that I'm sweating, and that it is humid, but it just doesn't seem like a big deal, just part of being summer.
The only problem? Had some people over today, and I realized that keeping the house at a chilly 83 degrees was still uncomfortably warm for my guests. I pumped the AC and put out some cool drinks, but by the time the house cooled down, the sun had gone down and people had wandered outside. Guess there's a downside to being acclimated :(

TLV

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Re: Heat acclimatization
« Reply #16 on: July 05, 2012, 11:08:39 AM »
I have yet to get truly acclimated, but it's not my fault- we're not even forecast to hit 80* F until this weekend. June went back and forth between cloudy/rainy low 60's and sunny low 70's.