Author Topic: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic  (Read 179418 times)

MDM

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #50 on: June 20, 2016, 03:04:40 PM »
Cannot access the spreadsheet. Can you re-post it? The link just takes me to my Google Drive.
Works for me...?

Upthread someone speculated that a work firewall might cause access problems...?

slappy

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #51 on: August 02, 2016, 06:51:51 AM »
Cannot access the spreadsheet. Can you re-post it? The link just takes me to my Google Drive.
Works for me...?

Upthread someone speculated that a work firewall might cause access problems...?

That was me.  I can't access it at work. It says Google Drive is unavailable or something like that. I just tried on my phone and was able to access it there. 

MoonLiteNite

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #52 on: August 21, 2016, 02:34:42 AM »
Cannot access the spreadsheet. Can you re-post it? The link just takes me to my Google Drive.
Works for me...?

Upthread someone speculated that a work firewall might cause access problems...?

That was me.  I can't access it at work. It says Google Drive is unavailable or something like that. I just tried on my phone and was able to access it there.
Alot of IT at work block google drive and google docs/sheets to help protect IP :)
I use tor at work to bypass all that crap

jsa307

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #53 on: November 28, 2016, 08:44:57 AM »
Thanks to those who put this spreadsheet together!

A beginner question: I'm trying to use this spreadsheet to estimate my net positive cash flow each month. Would that be line 127 ("available for taxable investment") or line 140 ("after-tax investable")? What's the difference between those two items?

Thanks again!

MDM

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #54 on: November 28, 2016, 12:21:56 PM »
I'm trying to use this spreadsheet to estimate my net positive cash flow each month. Would that be line 127 ("available for taxable investment") or line 140 ("after-tax investable")? What's the difference between those two items?
They should be the same number, reached by different groupings of income and expenses.  In the current version they may differ by the pre-tax commuter amount, but that has been fixed for the next update.

jsa307

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #55 on: November 28, 2016, 12:57:19 PM »
Thanks very much for the reply -- the numbers do indeed differ by the pre-tax commuter amount.

So thinking in terms of how much "extra" money you have available each month, the final number is ultimately somewhere in between those 2 numbers? The commuter money is actually being spent, but you're getting an x% discount on the spending, applied later (with x = whatever your total tax percentage is)? Is that right?

Thanks!

MDM

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #56 on: November 28, 2016, 01:10:57 PM »
So thinking in terms of how much "extra" money you have available each month, the final number is ultimately somewhere in between those 2 numbers?
If you edit cell B137 to remove "+B9" and then enter your actual commuter expense (which may or may not equal your pre-tax amount) in cell B82 or B95, etc., that should provide correct numbers.

jsa307

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #57 on: November 29, 2016, 05:21:04 AM »
Thanks MDM. I was actually using the "pre-tax commuter" amount as the place to enter my business deductions (I'm self employed) - is there a better cell to do that in?

Thanks again for your help, if this is getting too specific for a general thread, I can message you instead..

MDM

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #58 on: November 29, 2016, 09:49:14 AM »
Thanks MDM. I was actually using the "pre-tax commuter" amount as the place to enter my business deductions (I'm self employed) - is there a better cell to do that in?

Thanks again for your help, if this is getting too specific for a general thread, I can message you instead..
Seems generic enough.  Cell B24 is for net business income.  If you want to do a more detailed calculation in the spreadsheet itself, you could unprotect the 'Calculations' sheet, do your business income and expenses calculations in some currently-blank cells (e.g., cols A-M, row 220 and below), and set B24 equal to the result.  See www.excel1040.com for what may be the most detailed federal income tax spreadsheet available if you want some ideas....

swick

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #59 on: January 18, 2017, 01:32:37 PM »
Yes, Thanks RetiredAt63, I'll update instructions.

RetiredAt63

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #60 on: January 18, 2017, 02:18:40 PM »
Thanks.

bluetick

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #61 on: March 17, 2017, 10:40:54 AM »
Hello,

Just downloaded the cash flow spread sheet and started to fill it out.  I just started a new job and don't contribute to Social Security because of CalPERS.  Is there a way to disable that cell on the Calculation Tab?

MDM

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #62 on: March 17, 2017, 11:14:41 AM »
Just downloaded the cash flow spread sheet and started to fill it out.  I just started a new job and don't contribute to Social Security because of CalPERS.  Is there a way to disable that cell on the Calculation Tab?
Yes.

Unprotect the sheet, then edit or delete the formula in cell B43.  E.g., change 0.062 to 0.

bluetick

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #63 on: April 11, 2017, 11:16:38 PM »
Hey All,

Working on writing up my case study and I'm not sure how to handle a few situations.  I recently started working for a public agency where I have access to a CalPERS pension, a 457b and the Public Service Student Loan Forgiveness Program(PSLF) and REPAYE.  I've got private and Federal student loans.  I've got about $44k in student loans that are eligible for PSLF at an avg rate of 4.8%. Since I had very low income last year due to being in school, my current payments for the next year or so are $0, thanks to REPAY. Using the repayment calculator on Studentloans.gov I get the estimates below, which assumes a 5% income growth annually:

First Monthly Payment
$224
Last Monthly Payment
$395
Total Amount Paid
$36,457
Public Service Loan Forgiveness
$26,805
Repayment Period
120 months


SO my question is how to account for the effective cost of this loan in the Case Study Cash FLow to FI spreadsheet that folks use here?  Should I just take the actual amount paid/ 120 payments back out the interest rate?  Or use an interest rate of 0%?  I want to try and make the FI projection as accurate as possible.    I've got some other questions about how to account for the CalPERS, but that can wait for another post. 


Thanks

MDM

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #64 on: April 12, 2017, 12:13:57 AM »
SO my question is how to account for the effective cost of this loan in the Case Study Cash FLow to FI spreadsheet that folks use here?  Should I just take the actual amount paid/ 120 payments back out the interest rate?  Or use an interest rate of 0%?  I want to try and make the FI projection as accurate as possible.    I've got some other questions about how to account for the CalPERS, but that can wait for another post.
Definitely not an interest rate of 0%.

Unless you'd like to modify the spreadsheet formulas - always possible! :) - you'll have a tradeoff between the accuracy of the SL interest deduction vs. the time to FI calculation.

Realistically, in most cases your SL repayment accuracy will be well within the likely error estimating future investment returns, expenses, and income, so don't sweat this too much.  Doing "actual amount paid/ 120 payments [and] back out the interest rate" seems reasonable.

Also see Panicked Borrowers, and the Education Department’s Unsettling Silence - The New York Times and consider simply repaying the loans.  Ten years is a long time, and you might find a great opportunity that would be outside the PSLF program during that time....

rockeTree

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #65 on: April 14, 2017, 08:19:09 AM »
This is a great tool and I really appreciate the work and time that went into it (and then the answering of all the questions!). I am trying to figure out how to get my state taxes into the calculations correctly; currently it's showing zero. The instructions page seems to refer me to M30-31 on the calculations tab but that seems to connect to everything else so don't want to play with it blindly. Is there a place to put in my state that I'm missing?

Edit: (Found it - it's H-35 if you're following along at home!)

Edit: holy heck I spend a ton of money.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2017, 09:05:04 AM by rockeTree »

MDM

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #66 on: April 14, 2017, 11:59:49 AM »
This is a great tool and I really appreciate the work and time that went into it (and then the answering of all the questions!). I am trying to figure out how to get my state taxes into the calculations correctly; currently it's showing zero. The instructions page seems to refer me to M30-31 on the calculations tab but that seems to connect to everything else so don't want to play with it blindly. Is there a place to put in my state that I'm missing?

(Found it - it's H-35 if you're following along at home!)
Yes, the instructions should say:
 - State+local taxes are estimated at some % of "State Taxable".                             
    - Here, "State Taxable" = Federal AGI - Federal Exemptions.  Note: no deductions.                        
    - You can change the % in cell H35.  If you want, you can add a formula for your state in cell G35.                        

They will when the next version is loaded.  Meanwhile, I'll have a conversation with the quality control department....

Heroes821

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #67 on: July 11, 2017, 01:54:06 PM »
I finally started using the case study sheet, and I've run into some things I was confused on.

Under Mortgage do I put the total I pay there or just principle OR principle and Interest?

I see a section for property tax, and for house insurance, but is the mortgage insurance part for PMI?

Since I'm confused on that part I'm also not seeing where to find deductible Mortgage Interest in the tax section.

And lastly, that I can think of at the moment, Where is the compare to AMT part? I can't for the life of me spot it, but maybe I need to use the search tool.

MDM

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #68 on: July 11, 2017, 08:17:38 PM »
I finally started using the case study sheet, and I've run into some things I was confused on.

Under Mortgage do I put the total I pay there or just principle OR principle and Interest?
You put the mortgage inputs - amount financed (cell E57), length of loan (F57), and interest rate (I57) - and the spreadsheet calculates the monthly payment (that includes both principle and interest).  If you want to estimate "time to FI" or refine the mortgage interest estimate then you can input the current principal balance (G57) and the spreadsheet will calculate years remaining on the mortgage.

Quote
I see a section for property tax, and for house insurance, but is the mortgage insurance part for PMI?
Yes.

Quote
Since I'm confused on that part I'm also not seeing where to find deductible Mortgage Interest in the tax section.
It is estimated in cell G34 based on entries in G57 and I57.

Quote
And lastly, that I can think of at the moment, Where is the compare to AMT part? I can't for the life of me spot it, but maybe I need to use the search tool.
See the 'Form6251' tab and compare to the IRS 2016 Form 6251 - f6251.pdf.

Good questions!  Keep 'em coming as needed.

farfromfire

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #69 on: August 20, 2017, 01:24:22 AM »
Thanks for the great spreadsheet, MDM!

I have one question, though - does the FI calculator at the bottom of the Calculations sheet take into account the growth of qualified dividends (B26) over time? If not, how can I take into account the compounding of dividend reinvesting while adjusting the increased taxation?

MDM

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #70 on: August 22, 2017, 03:34:12 AM »
Thanks for the great spreadsheet, MDM!

I have one question, though - does the FI calculator at the bottom of the Calculations sheet take into account the growth of qualified dividends (B26) over time?
Somewhat.  The projected taxable account balance at retirement (cell B160) does include compounded growth.  It doesn't include year-to-year changes in income, such as wages or dividends.

Quote
If not, how can I take into account the compounding of dividend reinvesting while adjusting the increased taxation?
Some more sophisticated calculations (which are still only as good as the rates of return and other assumptions made) can be found in Best and/or Recommended Retirement Calculator - Bogleheads.org.

farfromfire

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #71 on: August 22, 2017, 04:01:29 AM »
Thanks for the great spreadsheet, MDM!

I have one question, though - does the FI calculator at the bottom of the Calculations sheet take into account the growth of qualified dividends (B26) over time?
Somewhat.  The projected taxable account balance at retirement (cell B160) does include compounded growth.  It doesn't include year-to-year changes in income, such as wages or dividends.
Yeah, that's exactly what I meant. I assumed that the default 5% return rate was after subtracting dividends, since most here typically assume 7% inflation-adjusted returns that include ~2% dividends, and thus B26 has to be adjusted every year.

Quote
Quote
If not, how can I take into account the compounding of dividend reinvesting while adjusting the increased taxation?
Some more sophisticated calculations (which are still only as good as the rates of return and other assumptions made) can be found in Best and/or Recommended Retirement Calculator - Bogleheads.org.
Thanks, I'll check it out!

mustachepungoeshere

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #72 on: February 03, 2018, 06:13:16 PM »
Read and examine the case thoroughly
Take notes, highlight relevant facts, underline key problems.
Focus your analysis
Identify two to five key problems
Why do they exist?
How do they impact the organization?
Who is responsible for them?
Uncover possible solutions
Review course readings, discussions, outside research, your experience.
Select the best solution
Consider strong supporting evidence, pros, and cons: is this solution realistic?
Drafting the Case
Once you have gathered the necessary information, a draft of your analysis should include these sections:

Introduction
Identify the key problems and issues in the case study.
Formulate and include a thesis statement, summarizing the outcome of your analysis in 1–2 sentences.
Background
Set the scene: background information, relevant facts, and the most important issues.
Demonstrate that you have researched the problems in this case study.
Alternatives
Outline possible alternatives (not necessarily all of them)
Explain why alternatives were rejected
Constraints/reasons
Why are alternatives not possible at this time?
Proposed Solution
Provide one specific and realistic solution
Explain why this solution was chosen
Support this solution with solid evidence
Concepts from class (text readings, discussions, lectures)
Outside research
Personal experience (anecdotes)
Recommendations
Determine and discuss specific strategies for accomplishing the proposed solution.
If applicable, recommend further action to resolve some of the issues
What should be done and who should do it?

That's amazing, @Clara Smith. You've not only managed to completely miss the point of the thread, you've also plagiarised your response.

https://awc.ashford.edu/tocw-guidelines-for-writing-a-case-study.html

CDN_Dreamer

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #73 on: February 18, 2018, 09:35:21 AM »
Does anyone know if similar spreadsheet exists for Canadians?

zee dot

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #74 on: March 14, 2018, 12:25:21 PM »
Is there a line to enter current savings and current emergency fund amounts? 
I see a line for taxable savings and a monthly line for emergency fund.
Thank you!

MDM

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #75 on: March 14, 2018, 12:45:09 PM »
Is there a line to enter current savings and current emergency fund amounts? 
I see a line for taxable savings and a monthly line for emergency fund.
Thank you!
Good question.  The answer requires some explanation.

The line for emergency fund contributions (cell B100 in the current version) is there to help people understand current cash flow.  E.g., if they think their current e-fund balance is too low and want to understand how far down the Investment Order they can go this year.

The line for taxable savings (cell B173 in the current version) is there for an estimate of "time to Financial Independence (FI)" .  It assumes that amount is invested in things riskier, thus ultimately yielding some return above inflation, than an e-fund would be.

The spreadsheet ignores the e-fund balance, making the assumption that it merely grows with inflation and no effect on time to FI.

Does that make sense?

MEJG

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #76 on: November 15, 2018, 05:32:53 AM »
I am looking, and probably blind.  Where in the spreadsheet would the income and deductions from my LLC go? I would think in non-paycheck items.....

MDM

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #77 on: November 15, 2018, 09:44:33 AM »
I am looking, and probably blind.  Where in the spreadsheet would the income and deductions from my LLC go? I would think in non-paycheck items.....
There is not a comprehensive "Schedule C" section, but there is "Schedule C net profit" (row 30) and rows 47 and 48 for a couple of "Self-employed..." items.

If one uses Schedule E instead, then rows 13 and 14 ("Rental" items) may be appropriate.

Does that help?

MEJG

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #78 on: November 18, 2018, 05:15:54 AM »
Indeed! Very helpful. Thank you.

Stamag

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #79 on: February 05, 2019, 11:58:03 AM »
Very helpful, especially the template.  Thanks!

zee dot

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #80 on: October 14, 2019, 12:40:54 PM »
When I open the XL it says 2018 Cash Flow at the top.
Is that the most recent version?
Thank you!

MDM

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #81 on: October 14, 2019, 12:59:36 PM »
When I open the XL it says 2018 Cash Flow at the top.
Is that the most recent version?
Thank you!
Good catch - no, it is not the most current.

See Case Study Spreadsheet updates for a link to the 2019 version.

The post at the beginning of this thread should refer to the above link instead of directly to the spreadsheet, for just this reason. 

E.g., instead of "This spreadsheet https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B45krBaG0b6KTWZDeXEySVBHVXc/view?usp=sharing can be downloaded and used to help organize your case study posting" it would be better to have "The Case Study Spreadsheet (see Case Study Spreadsheet updates for a link to the latest version can be downloaded and used to help organize your case study posting."

I'll notify the moderators to see if one of them can make that change.  Thanks!


MDM

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #82 on: October 16, 2019, 04:08:17 PM »
I'll notify the moderators to see if one of them can make that change.  Thanks!
And, thanks to arebelspy, it's done.

Louisville

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #83 on: March 17, 2022, 07:19:28 AM »
Judging by the inputs, I get the idea that the Case Study Spreadsheet is for people who are still working. As someone who has stopped working (for the moment) is there any value in me stepping through it?

grantmeaname

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #84 on: March 17, 2022, 08:39:40 AM »
Do you want advice about your income and expenses in a formalized way? If so, there is probably value in stepping through it. If not, then probably not.

MDM

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #85 on: March 17, 2022, 10:23:51 AM »
Judging by the inputs, I get the idea that the Case Study Spreadsheet is for people who are still working. As someone who has stopped working (for the moment) is there any value in me stepping through it?
In addition to grantmeaname's perspective, it can be useful if you want to understand the marginal tax rate you would incur for various options, such as a Roth IRA conversion.

There can also be value in organizing and assessing your situation well enough that you know what input values to use.

pantrystaple

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #86 on: February 03, 2023, 11:11:30 PM »
What's the best way to get inputs on my spending/savings rate if I am based outside of the US? Does it work to plug in my numbers after converting them to USD for PPP (purchasing power parity)?

passionfruit17

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #87 on: February 15, 2024, 02:05:19 PM »
The Net Paycheck before tax (B20) is exactly $1500 higher than box 1 on my w2. I believe they should be identical.
My employer contributes $1500 to my HSA (I contribute the remaining) $6250, so it might be the source of the confusion?
I entered $6250  in Employer Sponsored HSA (B7) and added the $1500 in the Employer Match (B19_, which is not involved in the calculation of B20. (B19 also shows my 401(k) employer match)

I'd like to get it right, because I overshot on withholdings based on the calculation from this spreadsheet (not that big a deal, gave Uncle Sam a small zero interest loan for a few months), and since I'm in the phaseout area of MAGI for Roth IRA contributions, it looks like I will be able to contribute more than I expected (a good thing)

MDM

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #88 on: February 15, 2024, 05:03:42 PM »
The Net Paycheck before tax (B20) is exactly $1500 higher than box 1 on my w2. I believe they should be identical.
My employer contributes $1500 to my HSA (I contribute the remaining) $6250, so it might be the source of the confusion?
I entered $6250  in Employer Sponsored HSA (B7) and added the $1500 in the Employer Match (B19_, which is not involved in the calculation of B20. (B19 also shows my 401(k) employer match)

I'd like to get it right, because I overshot on withholdings based on the calculation from this spreadsheet (not that big a deal, gave Uncle Sam a small zero interest loan for a few months), and since I'm in the phaseout area of MAGI for Roth IRA contributions, it looks like I will be able to contribute more than I expected (a good thing)

Can you post a screenshot similar to the one below, or just list all the non-zero amounts in cells B3:B20?


passionfruit17

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #89 on: February 15, 2024, 08:55:18 PM »


My W2 box 1 is 197026
box 12 W is $7750
Employer match is $4757 401(k) match, plus $1500 HSA employer contribution. I think I got advice here to handle the SSA contribution that way but I could be mistaken
If I were to add the $1500 to B7 instead of B19, the number in B20 would match box 1
« Last Edit: February 15, 2024, 08:58:05 PM by passionfruit17 »

passionfruit17

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #90 on: February 15, 2024, 09:00:41 PM »
My wife has a home business where we can claim a deduction (above the line) for home office/studio use which I also didn't think to enter somewhere in the sheet, I'm guessing C49 would be the place to enter the home deduction?

MDM

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #91 on: February 15, 2024, 10:56:29 PM »
If I were to add the $1500 to B7 instead of B19, the number in B20 would match box 1
If you do that, does B9 also match your W-2 box 5?

The note for cell B3 suggests "Often, W-2 box 5 plus all amounts in rows 4-8 on this sheet."  Does that work for the W-2 and more detailed compensation report your employer provides?

MDM

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #92 on: February 15, 2024, 11:03:53 PM »
My wife has a home business where we can claim a deduction (above the line) for home office/studio use which I also didn't think to enter somewhere in the sheet, I'm guessing C49 would be the place to enter the home deduction?
Based on Schedule C line 30 you would handle that "behind the scenes" (or add a tab to the CSS for her business income/expense details) and enter the Schedule C line 31 result in cell C30.

passionfruit17

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Re: How To: Write a "Case Study" Topic
« Reply #93 on: February 16, 2024, 09:58:10 AM »
My wife has a home business where we can claim a deduction (above the line) for home office/studio use which I also didn't think to enter somewhere in the sheet, I'm guessing C49 would be the place to enter the home deduction?
Based on Schedule C line 30 you would handle that "behind the scenes" (or add a tab to the CSS for her business income/expense details) and enter the Schedule C line 31 result in cell C30.
Yes B5 matches too, so I'll enter the entire HSA contribution (self+employer) in B7. Thanks for the help!