Author Topic: Your take on the kitchen of the future?  (Read 10386 times)

sistastache

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 64
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #50 on: September 02, 2016, 09:55:29 AM »
I have not read every reply, but I know what I want in my kitchen.....unfixed stuff!

I would like a dresser for plates and stuff, and freestanding cupboards at the right hight for cooking on. The only fixed thing would be the sink.

 And an old fashioned walk in pantry with a marble cold shelf.

Obviously being moustacian, I am stuck with what I have, but I would never have a fitted kitchen if I could get away with it.

Mrs Brave, I am starting to hear more and more about unfitted kitchens.  Outside of the US, I understand that people purchase their cabinetry and move them from home to home as they move.  How do Mustachians feel about this?  I like the idea of buying higher quality, but each house floorplan is so unique, there may be some serious qualms.  But with unfitted cabinetry, maybe this is the solution?

sistastache

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 64
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #51 on: September 02, 2016, 10:00:21 AM »
We cook almost 100% from scratch and almost all meals at home. I worked in a restaurant in high school, and am a former lab tech-- for me a kitchen is a lab space for my stomach. I don't really care for anything that isn't practical.

1.  Residential kitchen spaces/ cabinetry that mirror an industrial or commercial kitchen
consider design in space/hookups for two dishwashers--- wonderful for long cooking days, holidays, parties---- otherwise the space can be used for a medium sized pull out pantry bin, or trash can--
consider pantry space-- not just as an afterthought, or for small packages-- but a dedicated space with a modular format that allows configuration for large bins of bulk items-- consider using off the shelf items from restaurant supply for bulk storage.

Open shelves in middle of island--- look at lab designs. https://labfurnitureandfumehoods.com/news/ --- easy to access

deeper counter-tops with area for storage of ktichen tools liek blenders and kitchenaids--- when they are stored the countertop can still be used as a full depth...---jsut an idea to kick around.... 

separate dishwashing/cleanup vs prep areas---  sink at both--- very deep--- garbage disposals on both--- big enough to put a large colander into

If designing spice/consumable storage areas--- not near stoves- the heat is bad for spices-- OK if you're making a lot of food going through consumables like a resturant does, but not good for home cooking.
Drawers-- wide and deep-- I have a buddy who has 36" wide cabinets with 2 drawers--1 shallow at the top and 2 deeper ones-- they are superb for seeing everything at once and getting to things easily.

Storage over the fridge--- make it a pull out shelf with small sides (3" or so) that can hold items not routinely used---canning items, steamers, etc. use full pull out slides---  this is always a pain to get to -- 24" deep and high up--- a full pull out would allow someone to get to either side with a small stool or something. Could also be a good place for bulk storage with modular bins.

Forget stainless steel-- it's easy to clean but with residential grade stuff you're gonna get scuffs. Better to use laminate-- look up Formica 180xf--- I love laminate- durable, light, easy to install, looks good.  Get working on a cheaper and better way to attach a undermount sink to a laminate countertop....  Also matching stainless steel finishes is nearly impossible--- for a commercial kitchen no one cares....


2.  Residential kitchen spaces/ cabinetry that is inspired by the modular and small space solutions in Asia
under the sink trash cans that hold 13 gallon cans... not sure how this can be done -----My kitchen currently is a 7x10 galley kitchen with no floor space for a trash can, and we do enough cooking at home that a small under sink can won't work. We keep the can just outside in the dining room.
modular bins for spices, measuring cups, spoons--- we use a bin for our measuring cups and spoons--- just pull the whole bin down grab what you need and put the rest back. we use the square sided bins from restaurant supply store for spice packets and smaller containers. see: https://www.therestaurantstore.com/items/7398

3.  Residential kitchen spaces/ cabinetry that helps homeowners feel they are less wasteful
look at solutions for recycling--- I remember small bins under the sink in Germany that have bins for organic waste as well as trash, and recycling.... make it an easy to add feature---
4.  Residential kitchen spaces/ cabinetry that incorporates sensor technology to monitor cabinet contents and activity
I'm not interested in this in the slightest--- to me it means highly processed, small packets of food that are costly --- I use a paper planner because: it can get rained on, won't run out of batteries, and can be customized for how my mind works--- kitchen organization should be about the same.

And the last, isn't really mustachian, but I would still like your ideas on the topic:
5. Residential kitchen spaces/ cabinetry that reflect home-owners that eat out far more than they eat in (how would a kitchen change? what would the space prioritize?)
this could be adapted to consider age in place-- this is going to be a big thing in the future I think--- consider ergonomics. Also what about someone who's family cooks or provides meals..... I'd think that having thoughts for food reheating, portioning might be in order.

I definitely agree on a dedicated space for the bin.  Placing it under the sink, especially when a deep sink is combined with a disposal is often the issue... there just isn't enough room!

I see the trend of open shelving is becoming a bit of a staple these days- and at one point did have some in a rental, but with windows open to capture the breeze, everything became dusty and more work to use than was worth for the increased accessibility.  Open shelving is certainly a less expensive option and really allows for the "open and airy" look that is so popular, maybe glass cabinets are the compromise?

sistastache

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 64
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #52 on: September 02, 2016, 10:03:02 AM »
Agree with others: once you have had drawers in your lower cabinets you will never go back to plain cabinets - no more squatting down, no more looking for things at the back of the cabinet.  Just pull out the drawer and everything is there to see and pick out.

Also, the sort of handles that are a loop that you can put your hand behind rather than having to grab.  Just make sure they are the sort without bits sticking out at each end for kids/dogs to hurt themselves on.  Why would anyone have knobs?

Undermount sinks work easiest for the cleanup, unless you have one of the fully integrated into the worktop stainless steel or corian sort.

In fact, the sort of design that works for the disabled is the sort of design which is safe and convenient for someone putting a meal together.

I don't understand why people need so many cabinets.  Haven't they Marie Kondo'd their kitchens?  It's the same principle as clothes: you use 10% of the things 90% of the time.

There will always be some people who always prepare real food from scratch and others who always have convenience food.  There will be a lot of people who think they are the first but are much closer to the second - so the kitchen has to pretend to be for the first while really being for the second

This is a great question!  To the general mustachian population, do you have enough storage?  Too little?  Too much?  In most places I've lived, I have always had enough storage for the essentials, because just as former player mentioned, we use the same 10% of things 90% of the time.

ketchup

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3948
  • Age: 28
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #53 on: September 02, 2016, 10:10:28 AM »
This is a great question!  To the general mustachian population, do you have enough storage?  Too little?  Too much?  In most places I've lived, I have always had enough storage for the essentials, because just as former player mentioned, we use the same 10% of things 90% of the time.
My kitchen is "smallish" by most people's standards, but I have enough storage space for my needs (and we don't have too much in the way of kitchen gadgetry).  The only thing I'd change is to add a little more counter space, as it can get crowded while cooking. 

And the cabinets above the refrigerator are just empty and stupid.  I'd have to stand on top of the sink to even get to them (and I'm not short).  I'd rather have nothing there than something useless.

sistastache

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 64
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #54 on: September 02, 2016, 10:14:51 AM »
Interesting thoughts!! With drawers on the bottom, what do you do about the corner cabinet?

It depends on your layout... you can keep a full height door and use a lazy susan or blind cabinet.  You can create what's called a "void corner" and you lose some storage but gain accessibility because you can plan you drawers to nearly abut each other in perpendicular fashion.  There are also corner cabinets that are drawer banks of 3 drawers.  You lose some storage here as well (compared to a lazy susan cabinet with a door), but you keep the drawer style.  Or as mentioned by another poster, redesign the layout to not have a corner cabinet. Just depends on what your storage needs are and the space available.

Adge

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 53
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #55 on: September 02, 2016, 10:18:45 AM »
An induction cooktop built into (or rather, attached to the underside of) a quartz or other solid-surface countertop so that there are no seams and it can be cleaned as easily as the counter.

Yes, please! I really enjoyed cooking on induction when I had it, but induction without the grimy seams would be even better!

sistastache

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 64
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #56 on: September 02, 2016, 10:25:55 AM »
And the cabinets above the refrigerator are just empty and stupid.  I'd have to stand on top of the sink to even get to them (and I'm not short).  I'd rather have nothing there than something useless.

I have empty ice cube trays in mine.  I get you.  But, there are some options now to use this space as vertical storage for cookie sheets and the like.  I've also seen this become the locked up booze cabinet.

Goldielocks

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6308
  • Location: BC
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #57 on: September 02, 2016, 10:37:02 AM »
I instantly thought of #5 when I read your title..

5. Residential kitchen spaces/ cabinetry that reflect home-owners that eat out far more than they eat in (how would a kitchen change? what would the space prioritize?)


Kitchens have become "ego islands"  with huge oven walls and ranges with huge$'s spent just to "look good".. And the owners that almost never cook, or at least never use an oven for more than pizza reheating.

People are just waiting for a new trend that lets them look very trendy, rich, but does NOT involve a wolfe range.

I think that large ovens will go away, kitchen prep areas will shrink, but be infused with very high tech items.  Look at the built in coffee dispenser, the sousvide, and steam ovens trending now...  Coupled with huge refrigerator, the future kitchen will have less pots, pans and "cooking", and this area will once again be placed out of view.

Maybe the prep area shrinks to a size that looks like a butlers pantry, beside a huge fridge  (walk in fridge / pantry) with prepped in a bag dinners. But opens up to the eating / great room and a separated dishwasher/sink / entertaining zone.


Many rich chinese and indian families here already have a "second kitchen" called a spice kitchen or wok kitchen, where 95% of the cooking is done, in a 7 x 8 ft pantry with applicances and extreme ventilation and room for exactly one person.  Then it opens to that fabulously decadent looking designer open show kitchen, that they don't really want.  (many have hired cooks / help anyway). 

So why not get rid of the elaborate kitchen all together?

MayDay

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4001
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #58 on: September 02, 2016, 11:38:37 AM »
Oh man, this is one of my favorite topics to randomly ponder as I lay in bed at night, falling asleep.  I have lived in a bunch of different houses, and I REALLY REALLY want to put in my own kitchen some day.

Background info:  We cook all from scratch, and also I can garden produce so we aren't super minimalist in the kitchen. 

Best kitchen I ever had:  simple galley kitchen, all white (necessary in a small kitchen, it would have been a sad dark cave with darker cabinets), and every single bottom cabinet was actually big drawers.  One side of the galley was a long work space and a stove.  The other side was sink, fridge, dishwasher. So close together, so efficient, but because of the huge drawers, we had tons of space for everything, and could find it all easily.

My ideal would probably be basically a galley, but with the long workspace side opening up to an eat in kitchen, and a few stools on the other side of the workspace (so an island basically).   

I HATE appliances out on the counters.  Visual clutter really bothers me.  And my kitchen is for WORK.  If it was just a display kitchen, maybe I would put my pretty vitamix out to look fancy.  But I want clear counters to work on.  I also use the full depth of the counters, so I wouldn't want an appliance garage.  I keep my vitamix, kitchenaid, and food processor in this little tiny closet in our kitchen, and just fetch them out when I use them, then put them back away.  I am young and can lift heavy things, no problem. When I'm 70, this may not be possible.  OTOH, I probably won't be canning anymore.  I have seen lift type things where the kitchenaid is stored under the counter and somehow lifts out like old sewing machines.  That would be awesome, but it would have to swing forward, not have the countertop be cut into. I want one solid countertop.

I don't care what the counter top material is, but I HAVE to have an undermount sink to be happy :).  (whatever, I've totally not had undermount sinks, but they suck compared to undermount).

My other huge pet peeve is when kitchen cabinets don't go all the way to the ceiling. Why do you want a foot of wasted space up there to collect dust? You could be sticking your christmas cookie cutters up there instead! 

I like white, and would be fine with glass, too.  I know white gets gross looking at times, but I liked that I could at least see the gross- wood cabinets get gross too, and I don't notice it until they are gummy with crud.  Ick.  I would love a bright colored kitchen, but am not brave enough to actually do it.  I want it to look good for 20 years, not 3 years. 


kitkat

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 86
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #59 on: September 02, 2016, 12:59:30 PM »
I instantly thought of #5 when I read your title..

5. Residential kitchen spaces/ cabinetry that reflect home-owners that eat out far more than they eat in (how would a kitchen change? what would the space prioritize?)


Kitchens have become "ego islands"  with huge oven walls and ranges with huge$'s spent just to "look good".. And the owners that almost never cook, or at least never use an oven for more than pizza reheating.


I see these kitchens perhaps not so much related to ego/looking good, but sort of in the way people see the need for an SUV when they drive solo 95% of the time. "But what if we want to take a big family road trip?" becomes "But what if I want to make Thanksgiving dinner for 20 people?".. the result -- massive overbuild, very low capacity factors!

This comes up a lot in Tiny House talk -- people will suggest someone use a smaller oven, a movable toaster oven, or forgo the oven altogether, and 9 times out of 10 the person has already decided they may want to make a thanksgiving turkey someday in their gosh darn TINY HOUSE! Even though they have never cooked a turkey in their lives! Let the dream die, people :)

sistastache

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 64
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #60 on: September 02, 2016, 01:38:27 PM »
I see these kitchens perhaps not so much related to ego/looking good, but sort of in the way people see the need for an SUV when they drive solo 95% of the time. "But what if we want to take a big family road trip?" becomes "But what if I want to make Thanksgiving dinner for 20 people?".. the result -- massive overbuild, very low capacity factors!

This comes up a lot in Tiny House talk -- people will suggest someone use a smaller oven, a movable toaster oven, or forgo the oven altogether, and 9 times out of 10 the person has already decided they may want to make a thanksgiving turkey someday in their gosh darn TINY HOUSE! Even though they have never cooked a turkey in their lives! Let the dream die, people :)

So much this.  I think you are spot on.  Many of the kitchens I worked on were for the intent of dinner parties that would held...one day.

Jack

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4734
  • Location: Atlanta, GA
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #61 on: September 02, 2016, 02:05:40 PM »
The sad thing is, it works the opposite way too: my wife and I actually use our kitchen, but it's such a horrible piece of crap that I'm embarrassed even to detail how horrible a piece of crap it really is. I should stop reading this thread, because it's making me want to drop my savings rate so I can afford to renovate...

mwulff

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 274
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #62 on: September 02, 2016, 02:20:55 PM »
The sad thing is, it works the opposite way too: my wife and I actually use our kitchen, but it's such a horrible piece of crap that I'm embarrassed even to detail how horrible a piece of crap it really is. I should stop reading this thread, because it's making me want to drop my savings rate so I can afford to renovate...

Depending on your situation it might be acceptable to renovate. We chose to rebuild our kitchen (as seen on page 1) because we want to stay in our small comfortable house. There was no way the kitchen would last for even another 10 years and we need at least 20-40 years out of it.

So if you are planning long term a renovation is sometimes worth the cost.

Cranky

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1700
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #63 on: September 02, 2016, 02:35:12 PM »
I have worked in a number of kitchens with the old metal cabinetry - they were actually manufactured in this area and there are a fair number of old houses that still have them. I think they are kind of noisy, actually, but they sure do last.

I am, as it happens, deep into a kitchen remodel right now. Our house was built in 1960 and the cabinetry - which was not deluxe in the first place - has just had it. Plus there really was very little cabinet or counter space given that it's a pretty decent sized room. After cooking in there for 21 years, I knew exactly how I wanted to change it up. (We also plan to stay here indefinitely.)

I'm getting mostly drawers and pull out cabinets - but there will only be two top cabinets in the kitchen. I'm quite short and I can't reach anything in the top cabinets except for the bottom shelf. I don't want to climb on a ladder any time I need something. So the top cabinets have glass, and really are for display more than anything else.

Plus, we're getting cabinets along a wall that had none at all, and that will be a coffee/tea bar, with plenty of storage space for mugs.

I do not love the white kitchen trend - I just like wood better. So our cabinets are hickory. Oh, and we're going from 3 electrical outlets to about 10. LOL

So - I'll report back about whether it really all works as well as I'm imagining it will!

bogart

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1047
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #64 on: September 02, 2016, 08:28:04 PM »
I haven't read most of the other replies, because I'm not that interested in what others want in their kitchens and don't think their preferences are usually like mine (which is why I don't care what theirs are).

We remodeled our home a few years ago and I designed the kitchen (with help) and it is close to perfect (for me).  Two (or more) people can work in it without crashing into each other.

The floors and counter tops are both made of tile.  If I did it over, I'd get better floor tile -- the stuff we picked is treacherously slippery when wet, something I didn't realize until it was too late.  The tile-topped counters cost ~$2/sq foot (we installed them ourselves).  I will never again (if I can avoid it) have a kitchen where I can't put a hot pan down on the counter.

The kitchen is about 12 feet long by 9 feet wide.  At one end there's an island that will seat 4 (would have seated 8 had I insisted that the builder design it the way I originally wanted, i.e., longer, but I yielded to his advice -- oops).  It has cabinets underneath it that open from both sides and are used to store less-used things, mostly the "good" plates, etc.

The kitchen itself has a long, L-shaped counter.  Fridge at one end, on the leftmost edge of the long-L.  I am right handed.  Immediately next to the fridge, a 3' (approx.) length of butcher-block counter.  Under that sits a board the same size as the counter that is about 6 inches lower than the counter and that can be pulled out (it is as deep as the counter is and can be pulled out to that depth).  This offers both a work area that someone seated (e.g. in a wheelchair) or short (e.g. a kid) can work at, and a readily available, flat, uncluttered surface right next to the fridge where bags of groceries can be placed for unpacking.  It is divine.  Underneath it are drawers I use for storing food storage containers and food prep tools.  The pots-n-pans also hang from a metal-mounted ceiling rack above this, though ideally they'd be closer to the stove.

Next there's the sink with a big window in front of it, looking out over the yard, and beside that the dishwasher, then a lazy Susan (installed) piece in the corner cupboard, more counter surface in the short edge of the L and the stove. 

Lower cabinets are drawers or have shelves that pull out fully (I'd probably do 100% drawers if I had it to do over).  The floor of the large cabinet that sits under the sink is a drawer, so it can be pulled out -- no scrambling to reach the cleanser/garbage bags, etc.  Dishwasher is installed, everything else pretty much drops into place (and can be removed).   I want things DH and I can easily replace ourselves.  Microwave just sits on a section of the counter (corner over the lazy susan between the sink and the stove).  Stove is flat-topped glass, and yes, I'd do induction if I had it to do over.  Stove controls on current unit are at the rear, if I replace it they'll be at the front (safety + universal access).  Stove vents to the outside for real, doesn't just recirculate.

Drawer & cabinet fronts are flat wood with no horizontal surfaces whatsoever (except their top edge), so they don't have dust/dirt clinging to them that needs to be cleaned off.  Appliances are black.  My new obsession after several irritating failures is to have appliances that only have mechanical/analog (not digital/computerized) parts -- last time the dishwasher failed, the repairman told us there were 3 computerized sections of the thing, the failure was caused by one of them, he couldn't tell us which one, and we could start replacing them one at a time, cost $150 each + service call each time, until we figured out which one it was.  Our new dishwasher has only knobs.  It's not my favorite for function and probably loses on energy efficiency, but as compared to having to replace the stupid thing every ~5 years, I'll take it. 

Other appliances are minimal -- we own a kitchen-aid mixer (sits on counter beside stove), a toaster, and a toaster oven.  The toaster is only b/c DH finds the toaster oven takes too long to make toast. 

I do not like to cook and increasingly take steps to embrace that reality -- I buy bacon cooked, I buy veggies frozen, chopped.  I like having a functional kitchen because I don't like to cook, so I want to minimize the time/effort I spend there.

csprof

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 229
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #65 on: September 02, 2016, 09:13:07 PM »
We cook almost 100% from scratch and almost all meals at home. I worked in a restaurant in high school, and am a former lab tech-- for me a kitchen is a lab space for my stomach. I don't really care for anything that isn't practical.

1.  Residential kitchen spaces/ cabinetry that mirror an industrial or commercial kitchen
consider design in space/hookups for two dishwashers--- wonderful for long cooking days, holidays, parties---- otherwise the space can be used for a medium sized pull out pantry bin, or trash can--
consider pantry space-- not just as an afterthought, or for small packages-- but a dedicated space with a modular format that allows configuration for large bins of bulk items-- consider using off the shelf items from restaurant supply for bulk storage.

Open shelves in middle of island--- look at lab designs. https://labfurnitureandfumehoods.com/news/ --- easy to access

deeper counter-tops with area for storage of ktichen tools liek blenders and kitchenaids--- when they are stored the countertop can still be used as a full depth...---jsut an idea to kick around.... 

separate dishwashing/cleanup vs prep areas---  sink at both--- very deep--- garbage disposals on both--- big enough to put a large colander into

If designing spice/consumable storage areas--- not near stoves- the heat is bad for spices-- OK if you're making a lot of food going through consumables like a resturant does, but not good for home cooking.
Drawers-- wide and deep-- I have a buddy who has 36" wide cabinets with 2 drawers--1 shallow at the top and 2 deeper ones-- they are superb for seeing everything at once and getting to things easily.

One of the most important things from professional kitchens that's usually missing from residential kitchens:

Restaurant-style prep trays for mise en place.  Doesn't have to be restaurant style, but they work nicely.  Stainless tub (ice in the bottom if needed) with close-fitting plastic insert trays for holding prepped ingredients.  Doesn't really need to be built in, but holy cow is it great having it set up.  I've found the commercial versions to be far less squirrley than trying to use a bunch of those little glass bowls.  Meh.  Rectangles fit together nicely.

(If I'm having a dinner party, I'll often wash & prep in the morning into these, plastic wrap 'em and store them in the fridge until cooking time, and then break them out and go.  Very very handy for staying organized when you're cooking.)

Also not built in, but drawing from the question of what's good to steal from restaurant techniques:  Plastic squirt bottles (like you'd put ketchup in at a fast food place) for oil are awesome as well.  I usually don't do it for olive, but for canola, which we go through rapidly, I keep one next to the stove.  Squirt - cook - done.  No spills, precise control over amount of oil, fast.

dreams_and_discoveries

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 929
  • Location: London, UK
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #66 on: September 05, 2016, 08:14:38 AM »
My kitchen is only a few years old and I love it. Pride of place is my aga :). With a drying rack above.

Then the rest is fitted cupboards/appliances in a more modern look. Enough space for all my stuff in cupboards, enough counter space to cook/bake etc - I spent money on things I valued, e.g. a filter tap, and economised where I didn't care.

You know what after living with it for a few years, I don't think I'd change anything.......for the kitchen shape I have it works perfectly.

gooki

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2376
  • Location: NZ
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #67 on: September 06, 2016, 11:57:30 PM »
More drawers under benches/cooktops (cabinets are a pain in the ass).

Induction cooktops hidden entirely under the bench. You won't even know it's there except for the markers for where to put the pots and the captive touch controls.

Less overhead cabinets.

Integrated dishwashers becoming more common place.

Splashback backlash, as paint proves to be just as easy to clean and easier to change.

Hidden LED lighting illuminating every drawer/cabinet.

kimmarg

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 749
  • Location: Northern New England
Re: Your take on the kitchen of the future?
« Reply #68 on: September 07, 2016, 03:24:49 AM »
adjustable height counter. I'm tall, hubby is short and I like to knead bread at arms length but do other stuff at a higher height. Plus as my kiddo starts to help in the kitchen it would be cool for her to reach. oooh and anyone with mobility imparements like an older person. So like the adjustable height desk at work but a counter section