Author Topic: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.  (Read 3281 times)

Ponderosa

  • Guest
Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« on: October 18, 2019, 01:39:40 PM »
I made a post about this before, so I apologize for repeating myself. Essentially I have been looking for a change from my horribly boring but cushy remote job which pays a bit over 100k for 20 hours a week. I'm looking to transition into software development and I've finished a well known bootcamp in there area. If I lost this job I'd most likely not stay in this field unless I could find another remote like it. Chances of losing this position is probably measured in the single digit percentage wise, so keep that in mind. Right now our combined before tax income has climbed to ~170k, which means we can save quite a bit in the coming years.  I don't feel unhappy day to day, just a restlessness to challenge myself and grow in a new direction career wise.

On a side note, to stave off complete boredom I have been diving into my hobbies and relationships with my spare time and have enriched my life greatly.

I'm struggling big time with this decision. My current career is pretty much stagnant, and I'm only ~ 20-25% FI (although are income and expenses are getting buttoned up so next year should be great, if income stays the same). I'm worried about 'rusting out' and missing the boat on transferring to tech as every week goes by I'm further from my online bootcamp completion. At this point I pretty much have zero motivation to code in my spare time, so my skills are waning. Not sure if this is a warning sign as is.

There is some new information now that makes this decision more complicated. My wife's depression has become an issue and we are focusing on getting her better with medication, therapy (soon to come, setting it up), and a ton of support. I've just recovered from a major depressive episode so I know how it feels. I'm finally feeling really good for the first time in my adult life and am reluctant to inject more stress in my life right now. Part of me just wants to stay at home working, supporting my wife, and enjoying life for what feels like the first time ever.

She works evenings as well, so if I were to take the new day job, there would be sometimes a week chunk of time where we wouldn't even see each other, which would suck. Not only that, I've discovered that tech jobs around here pay 50-60k starting, which would be a major downgrade. We would do fine financially but it would be a major short term blow to savings. I'd anticipate matching my current salary in 3-4 years.

I just don't know what to do. I want to get out there and try a new career, but the change in lifestyle, reduction in pay, and greatly reduced time with my life is making me really hesitant to make a move. I've a few interviews next week so I'm starting to feel really pressured to make a decision.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2019, 01:42:55 PM by Ponderosa »

affordablehousing

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 602
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2019, 02:54:34 PM »
Sounds like there are a lot of stressors happening all at the same time. I think you nailed it when you mentioned your priority is helping your wife get well and feel productive again. The bootcamps are usually meant to boost people's incomes, not lower them. A lot seems tied up in the feelings of stagnation. I'm not sure the armchair psychoanalysts of the MMM forum are going to be too helpful. Maybe you ought to seek some professional guidance as well specifically about career direction.

Tester

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 412
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2019, 05:30:26 PM »
So you are earning 100k for 20 hours working from home and want to switch to earning 60k for 40 hours working in an office.

I would switch from 200k working 40 hours in an office to 100k for 20 hours
That is still my plan,  but need to continue with the 40 hours until we manage to get spending under real control.

MonkeyJenga

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8887
  • Location: the woods
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2019, 05:55:54 PM »
So you are earning 100k for 20 hours working from home and want to switch to earning 60k for 40 hours working in an office.

Yeah, I don't understand this. And you wouldn't be passionate about the 60k job, so you'll go from 20 hours a week of boredom to X hours a week bored during your commute, 40+ hours stressed/frustrated/bored while working, and Y hours stressed/studying outside of work, for barely half the money. Plus you'll need to work more years overall.

It is a huge gift to have a high pay, low-stress job that you don't need to think about outside of work.

Dicey

  • Senior Mustachian
  • ********
  • Posts: 16941
  • Age: 63
  • Location: NorCal
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2019, 06:54:09 PM »
Erma Bombeck's classic gem, "The grass is always greener over the septic tank" is the first thing that comes to mind. Sorry if that's not helpful.

Tester

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 412
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2019, 09:29:58 PM »
Erma Bombeck's classic gem, "The grass is always greener over the septic tank" is the first thing that comes to mind. Sorry if that's not helpful.

First, yes, I am thinking about changing jobs too.

Second, I think I would go from 200k for 40 hours to 60k for 2 hours if I had a big enough stache.


For the OP: software development is something you need to like or it will drive you nuts.
And it.might be different for you but moving from 20 hours/week for 100k to 40 hours/week for 60k will become old quick.
More, you will have to give up your hobbies and extra things you said you started to like.
Not to mention time with family.

If you are a star in software engineering you can get a big amount of money, but I suggest you look at Glassdoor for wages for software developers with 15 years of experience.
You will be surprised if you will take into account the fact that you work 20 hours from home and they work 40.

Again, each person has their own view of the green grass so don't take this as patronizing, it might be that this change is right for you.

Good luck with any road you decide to go.

BicycleB

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3747
  • Location: Live Music Capital of the World
  • Older than the internet, but not wiser... yet
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2019, 09:51:36 PM »
I've discovered that tech jobs around here pay 50-60k starting, which would be a major downgrade.


I'm glad you discovered that now, instead of after you quit your cushy job!

If I had a needy wife, a small stash and cushy boring job, I wouldn't leave it unless I was accepting a passion job. Cushy jobs are rare, keep it until your stash fills up or you find something you love.

I suggest coding 20 hours a week, or any other schedule that fits. Your own projects if you can't find work that allows you to keep the cushy job. I have relatives who never expected their jobs to be anything but a job. Most jobs suck on some level and don't pay well. I might be biased by knowing several depressive and/or struggling people. Experience suggests to me it's wise to keep the cushy job.

2sk22

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 892
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2019, 06:44:59 AM »
I would also suggest reading Dr Doom's blog, especially his memoirs of his working life (https://livingafi.com/the-job-experience/) . His experience is quite representative of many people in the software field and the picture is not pretty.

The unpleasant truth is that only a small number of software people get to do fun creative work. The vast majority are basically doing grunt labor under sever time constraints (even though they may be well paid compared to other fields).

mistymoney

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 975
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #8 on: October 19, 2019, 09:57:31 AM »
I'm all about the enjoying your job and feeling engaged, etc. But you need to really think about how much of any job is going to be enjoyable.

The likelihood is that there will be at least 20 hours of boredom in the new, shiny, interesting job. I can't see an upside in making this change when you have plenty of time and freedom to work on other things during the week.

AccidentialMustache

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 615
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #9 on: October 19, 2019, 11:35:50 AM »
I'd be really hard pressed, if I could wave a wand and trade my job for a 100k-for-20-hours-a-week, to not be waving the wand wildly. And I have a cushy software dev job! It'd be a substantial pay downgrade, but it'd be a big free time upgrade.

Your current hourly pay rate is approximating $100/hr. For software dev, you aren't going to hit that pay rate for 5-10 years (outside of HCOL areas, there it'll be quicker). That's assuming you're really good at what you do and advance rapidly. 40 hr work week to hit 100/hr with let's call it 3 weeks vacation and 2 weeks holidays, assuming you're *only* working 40 hr weeks (which is a risk too), you'd need to be pulling in nearly 200k/yr. That's a far cry from 50-60k starting.

If you don't want to write code in your spare time, programming/software eng may not be the career for you anyway. Don't fall for a sunk cost fallacy over the boot camp $.


What I'd do in your situation, speaking as a experienced software dev -- I'd work the easy 100k and dump my "remaining" 20 hours into a side business. I have some ideas for boutique software that I think could go somewhere -- I just don't have the time or brain space to pursue them after my day job programming.

Or, I might build up my home repair skills and do some rentals. If you don't have the capital for rentals that's okay, if you have the skills you can start a business as a rental management company instead and as you get funds from that use it to get into your own rentals.

BECABECA

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 481
  • Age: 40
  • Location: Huntington Beach, CA
  • Retired since July 2017, not bored yet!
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #10 on: October 19, 2019, 11:54:57 AM »
Just how cushy is this 20 hour a week job? Can you automate some of it so itís only 10 hours a week of actual work? If youíre into software programming, then you might really enjoy the process of figuring out how to create an automation program.

If automation is out of the question, is there a way to outsource most of it? If itís really easy work, you could potentially outsource it to someone living in a lower cost area who would be very happy to be paid half of what youíre making and would result in you getting paid 50k for only a couple of hours of work a week managing it.

Noodle

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1300
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #11 on: October 19, 2019, 12:17:34 PM »
I'm all about the enjoying your job and feeling engaged, etc. But you need to really think about how much of any job is going to be enjoyable.

The likelihood is that there will be at least 20 hours of boredom in the new, shiny, interesting job. I can't see an upside in making this change when you have plenty of time and freedom to work on other things during the week.

I agree with this. I actually have a job with interesting work, good co-workers and good work conditions and I spend a good chunk of my week (maybe not 50%, but a chunk) doing stuff that is boring or that I don't care for.

In your shoes, I think I would consider keeping the income job and then committing the other 20/hours per week that you would spend at a new job in doing...something useful--whether that's managing the household so that you and your wife have free time together, doing more time-consuming frugal activities so you can get the savings rate up, a part-time job that would have more fun components to it, start a little business, whatever. I realize some people need a more structured environment, especially if depression/mental health is a factor, so if that's you maybe look at volunteering, working or studying in a structured environment rather than something more free-form.

The frugality writer Amy Dacyczyn once wrote about how she and her husband had a deal that they each worked 40 hours per week at their separate responsibilities (SAHP vs. income earner) and then split whatever work was left over. It varied as to which of them was playing which role at any given time, but they each committed to making the same contribution.

Ponderosa

  • Guest
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #12 on: October 19, 2019, 08:06:40 PM »
Its fairly cushy. Some weeks are 15 hours of work, the others can be closer to 25-30hrs. It probably will average 25hrs with a large project coming up.

There is only one project I stupidly took on recently that I don't like. But I already told them I'm not going to work on it past a certain date when the other project workload spikes.

I like the idea of a side business. I've never really thought about such a thing until now, but I want to explore this more.

Today I got it in my head that I'd do a 100 days of code challenge. I opened up my IDE, started punching some code and felt kinda crappy about what I was doing. I just couldn't summon the energy to bother with the task. Mind you, this is coming from someone who is pursues his passions and goals with single minded determination.

AccidentialMustache

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 615
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #13 on: October 19, 2019, 10:33:08 PM »
To really write code well, you need to be in the zone. If you aren't in the zone, you can write code, but you're going to really struggle with it. Getting in the zone takes time. 20-30 minutes is quoted a lot, but that's going to be a highly personal number. Practicing will (likely) help you get there quicker, but it doesn't "just happen" and you can't "code for 5 minutes" like you can clean up the kitchen for 5 minutes and expect to see progress. Turn off your facebook, email, IM, etc. Close the door. Soft music is okay, but only if its background noise to you.

I wouldn't do a 100 days of code challenge. That seems really open ended for just getting started. I'd instead pick up something like an old advent of code and try to solve a problem a day. People who are fast at those turn in times measured in single digit minutes. The average time is longer, but I'd expect someone who knows how to code to be able to do most in under an hour.

Ponderosa

  • Guest
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #14 on: October 20, 2019, 05:03:46 PM »
I would also suggest reading Dr Doom's blog, especially his memoirs of his working life (https://livingafi.com/the-job-experience/) . His experience is quite representative of many people in the software field and the picture is not pretty.

The unpleasant truth is that only a small number of software people get to do fun creative work. The vast majority are basically doing grunt labor under sever time constraints (even though they may be well paid compared to other fields).

I've been pouring over this blog and am fascinated, and horrified at the same time. A few months ago, I was offered a software gig at a huge financial company quite like the one he suffered through. I spent a ton of time interviewing them and asking to meet the team and the decision was clear: don't fucking go work at this place. So I turned them down when they last minute (9 PM) contacted me and put me in a corner to make the decision to work there or not.

This discussion in this post has been immensely helpful for me. I've been doing a ton of self reflection lately and this process has brought a ton of insight into my life. My wife and I have reignited and calibrated our journey to FI, and I've realized that a career change won't do anything for me when I have such a good gig now.

The only thing is I've been left with a little guilt over my spending this past year. I've managed to still max our 401ks, HSA's, and Roth's - but I could do way better given my means. Now I have the motivation.

If something happens to this job so be it. By the time it does I'll be well on my way to FI, and I could take my time figuring out the steps from there. I'm going to pass on getting a different job for now.

Thank you everyone.

BicycleB

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3747
  • Location: Live Music Capital of the World
  • Older than the internet, but not wiser... yet
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #15 on: October 20, 2019, 05:22:35 PM »
Thanks for reporting back, Ponderosa.

insufFIcientfunds

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 103
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #16 on: October 21, 2019, 10:40:39 AM »
I think if I were you I would try and augment my current employment situation with a side gig that either scratched that itch or a hobby that might give you a little better balance. I think everything is like a teeter, you have to have that balance or it throws your whole life off. Maybe the new career would better balance career aspiration, but it throws off you and your wifeís situation and delays her depression recovery. I know I thrive on stability and when that goes, my mind gets into a rut that takes a while to get out. If your wife is like that, it could make things worse.

I had left a job earlier this year to work in my family business and it threw me and my family off big time. Lot more hours, responsibilities, NO off switch. It was hard. I wound up taking a minatory ownership role and returning to my previous job and itís re-balanced my life a lot. My wife went back to work and itís provided the stability for the kids I didnít have. Itís honestly what they needed. Maybe I should have stayed, I donít know. But my son has bad anxiety and he needed me to be that stability in the mornings before school. So thatís what I do. Wife goes in early and gets him from school. He is thriving in school and he doesnít have to do latch-key (and equally important, I donít have to pay for latch-key.) I like my job and like my family business, but for me, itís family first, 100% of the time.



2sk22

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 892
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #17 on: October 21, 2019, 10:48:47 AM »
I've been pouring over this blog and am fascinated, and horrified at the same time. A few months ago, I was offered a software gig at a huge financial company quite like the one he suffered through. I spent a ton of time interviewing them and asking to meet the team and the decision was clear: don't fucking go work at this place. So I turned them down when they last minute (9 PM) contacted me and put me in a corner to make the decision to work there or not.

Glad you found that useful. Sadly, I know lots of people in really bad dead-end software jobs with abusive managers and grinding mega-corp bureaucracy.

Padonak

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 817
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #18 on: October 21, 2019, 11:20:54 AM »
Boring doesn't necessarily mean bad. People who risk their lives in wars or battle cancer are not bored, for example. I don't buy all this "get out of your comfort zone" BS that corporate swine likes to feed  lower level employees. I mean sure, I'll get out of my comfort zone but it will cost you. I'm not getting out of it to make five figures if Im already making six.

Specifically about your question, OP. Keep the current cushy job, try to automate as much as possible and  do freelancing as a programmer at the same time (Upwork, fiverr etc). If you like it and make good money, you can transition to full time programming later  on YOUR terms. Otherwise keep your cushy job.

blingwrx

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 83
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #19 on: October 21, 2019, 11:21:37 AM »
I'd stick with the 100k 20hrs a week cushy job hands down. I've worked several jobs in tech before and I can tell you 40hrs a week is not always the normal. These days in everything is competitive and they want you on call 24/7. In my office was still full at 6 o'clock. You looked bad if you left early and even then you might have to do some work at home that evening or on the weekends. Some of these jobs can turn out to be 60hrs a week depends on the job/company. 60k for 40 or even up to 60hrs a week and plus cost and time of commuting, No thanks. You probably save a but load working at home, I know I do. Going into the office just means cost of transportation, sometimes could mean buying coffee, breakfast or lunch outside. The costs will add up daily.

I'm a developer and I freelance full time now and I know a lot of companys outsource to freelancers these days instead of paying for a full time employee. I think you can easily pick up some side work making extra income doing the software development thing on the side while also keeping the 20hr a week job. Just sign up for some of those freelance websites like upwork ect.

As far as your wife and depression, always put family first. Things will get even more stressful if you're away from the house 50+ hours a week. Then you'll find you don't even have time to do any errands or hobbies at home. If your wifes job is a source of stress for her maybe she can cut back or pursue something she enjoys even if it means less money. You look to be in a good position to be able to take care of things on 1 income, granted it pushes out the FIRE date but mental wellbeing definitely is more important in the present.

JLee

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6864
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #20 on: October 21, 2019, 11:22:26 AM »
I would do $100k / 20 hours WFH in a heartbeat....I make ~20% more than that working ~40, and I really do like my job -- but freeing up half of my work time to do things I'm interested in would be fucking amazing.

cchrissyy

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 977
  • Location: SF Bay Area
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #21 on: October 21, 2019, 11:55:17 AM »
" Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help."
Sounds to me like the decision just got much LESS complicated.  Instead of weighing all the factors you've been struggling with about a possible career change, it is suddenly very clear that this is a bad time to make a move. Simple.

humbleMouse

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 300
  • Location: Minneapolis
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #22 on: October 21, 2019, 01:04:53 PM »
I saw your original post, and my opinion has not changed with this post.

I'm a "programmer" and make more than you, but I'd trade it for a remote job paying 100k with 20 hours of work no question.

You're literally insane and need a reality check.  Please board a flight to a 3rd world country and spend a week there so you can smack some reality into your brain and realize you have been given a gift of time money and health.

You also sound like you would be a terrible programmer if you can't even get the motivation to learn some coding on the side with your remote cushy job.  Coding isn't even that difficult. 

You need a reality check BIG TIME.  Stop worrying about this non-issue and put more time into your personal relationships and hobbies for god's sake. 


MOD NOTE: This post is just downright rude. Please don't.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2019, 05:08:43 PM by arebelspy »

Daisyedwards800

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 313
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #23 on: October 24, 2019, 11:44:38 AM »
Look - I spend 10 hours a week COMMUTING.  Plus the 40 at work (and then some).  Commuting is really boring also.  You have 20 hours a week of work and you can do another job in those other 20 hours (whether at night or something you're interested in during the day).  It sounds like you are bored and understimulated, but you will be bored at work too if it's not something you enjoy.

Keep this job, and do something COMPLETELY different in those other 20 hours.  Maybe start an ebay store and go hunting for items at auctions with your wife.  Maybe start coaching a sport.  Do something that's different and actually fun.

Villanelle

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4441
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #24 on: October 24, 2019, 12:32:25 PM »
Sounds like you are making some emotional progress, which is great.

I'll just add that your post very much gives me the impression of someone seeking Something, and looking to career to find it.  And that's not necessary bad, except my impression is that there's little reason to believe that a coding job is where you will find It.  You aren't passionate or excited about coding.  So it seems unlikely that you will be much happier there after you settle in and the excitement and challenge of transition has worn off.  And you've have given up a lot of money (so, years of your retirement life) and lots of weekly time, for what very likely wold be the same ennui. 

It sounds a lot like someone deciding to have a child because they are bored and listless.  It solves the problem short term but does nothing to address the roots. 

When you do retire, what will you retire to?  Who are you besides your job?  If I met you and asked you to tell me about yourself without mentioning anything about your job or your desire to retire, what would you say?  To me, it seems like you need to work on those things and that will help you fill out your life and give you a sense of purpose, which is what it seems like you are seeking with this job change.

FIREedUpCS

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 6
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #25 on: October 24, 2019, 09:34:21 PM »
OP, there are quite a few things to consider based on what you described, but let's think about this:

  • You would be taking a ~50% haircut in a brand new field.
  • You have only 20 hours dedicated/week to a high-paying job that is not going away
  • Your wife and you are working through some mental health challenges, but your job is not a major source of stress


Starting a new career in a competitive field with long hours will likely increase stress and we know it will bring in less money, which will likely also increase stress. I don't understand the upside to becoming a developer. I work with developers every day - they are under constant deadline with long hours. You will be giving up time, which you can't regain or purchase, for what frankly sounds like a worse situation.

Why can't you use the ample time you have to start a side business, develop hobbies, workout, cook, etc... these are all high quality of life things that you have time for every day. Hell, you can freelance as a dev in your off-time if you are that interested in the field.

But please, don't throw away your job without really thinking of the consequences. A little boredom is easily remedied. Give us an update!

skywatcher

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 4
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #26 on: October 25, 2019, 02:39:42 PM »
Sounds like you are making some emotional progress, which is great.

I'll just add that your post very much gives me the impression of someone seeking Something, and looking to career to find it.  And that's not necessary bad, except my impression is that there's little reason to believe that a coding job is where you will find It.  You aren't passionate or excited about coding.  So it seems unlikely that you will be much happier there after you settle in and the excitement and challenge of transition has worn off.  And you've have given up a lot of money (so, years of your retirement life) and lots of weekly time, for what very likely wold be the same ennui. 

It sounds a lot like someone deciding to have a child because they are bored and listless.  It solves the problem short term but does nothing to address the roots. 

When you do retire, what will you retire to?  Who are you besides your job?  If I met you and asked you to tell me about yourself without mentioning anything about your job or your desire to retire, what would you say?  To me, it seems like you need to work on those things and that will help you fill out your life and give you a sense of purpose, which is what it seems like you are seeking with this job change.

This is OP. Cleaning up online presence.

I feel like you hit it right on the spot. Thank you for your insight. Part of it is I don't know who I am completely - I spent most of my 20's pretty ill and using whatever energy left over relentlessly pursuing academic and career success. I never even took the time to take a break and ask myself - do I really want to do this? Why am I studying this? What is the point of this degree? Now I'm paying for that now, but being less than satisfied with my career and wondering who I am in the first place.

OP, there are quite a few things to consider based on what you described, but let's think about this:

  • You would be taking a ~50% haircut in a brand new field.
  • You have only 20 hours dedicated/week to a high-paying job that is not going away
  • Your wife and you are working through some mental health challenges, but your job is not a major source of stress


Starting a new career in a competitive field with long hours will likely increase stress and we know it will bring in less money, which will likely also increase stress. I don't understand the upside to becoming a developer. I work with developers every day - they are under constant deadline with long hours. You will be giving up time, which you can't regain or purchase, for what frankly sounds like a worse situation.

Why can't you use the ample time you have to start a side business, develop hobbies, workout, cook, etc... these are all high quality of life things that you have time for every day. Hell, you can freelance as a dev in your off-time if you are that interested in the field.

But please, don't throw away your job without really thinking of the consequences. A little boredom is easily remedied. Give us an update!

To explain further - I was very unhappy with my choice of degrees and where my career was going a few years ago. At that time, I thought software development would be the 'cure' for this, because of the job availability, salary, and seemed like I'd like that type of technical work as well. So I've been self studying for awhile now and did an extensive online bootcamp at the beginning of this year to reach this goal. Once I had the opportunity, it seemed wrong in my gut and I didn't take any of the offers I had. Now, I have little desire to code since I don't feel like my personal projects are that enjoyable. The motivation is just sapped at this point. It might be temporary, but I'm on a few month hiatus at this point. I think since the intention of getting a new job is now gone I can't bring myself to do it without that concrete of a goal.

To top that off, it clearly had no effect on the listlessness in the first place.

Addition: I hope people realize I'm grateful for what I have. I've worked immensely hard to land where I am today so my current position is no accident. I know not everyone has this type of opportunity so I realize it can sound kind of whiney to some. Now I'll mention that even though my job is rather cushy most of the time - that is because of the mastery I've developed. It would take a new engineer many years to get to the point that the work would take them this long.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2019, 02:43:25 PM by skywatcher »

Tester

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 412
Re: Decision to leave a remote job just got more complicated. Help.
« Reply #27 on: October 25, 2019, 04:40:36 PM »
You could do this: find something in your life you could solve with software.
Write it.
It might make you feel good and want to continue.

If not, think about what else you would like to do. Try it.
And so on.
You have some time to try things based on the workload.
Hopefully you will find something you will really love. Even if you won't it will give some points to focus on for a while and could remove some of the stress.