Author Topic: Would you take the job?  (Read 2201 times)

Money Bags

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Would you take the job?
« on: August 04, 2014, 09:52:19 PM »
Time or money, we can't have both. I recently interviewed for a new job. It would increase my income by approx. 25%, however, I would have to travel 39 weeks a year Sunday night through Friday afternoon half the weeks and through Thursday night the other half the weeks. Right now I travel around 14 weeks a year. The plus to travel is pocketable per diem so if I eat PB&Js I can pocket 250-300 extra a week. Also when home, my office would be in my house so even my bike would gather dust. I currently telework most days and ride employer subsidized mass transit to the office. I put around 2400 miles on my 13 year old Toyota each year. I figured that the extra would be enough to pay my house off and be ready for retirement in 13 years. Otherwise I figure I will be working for at least 24 more years. Also, I figured that I would have around 8 weeks vacation a year due to credit for Sunday travel and regular time off. So when home I would really not work a whole lot.

Right now I save over 30% of take home in 401k and Roth accounts. The kicker is the new gig includes a 4% extra match above what I already get. I figured that extra kicker at an average of 10% ROI over 24 years is worth around 600-700k. (put the calculator down you nerds, quit trying to figure out how much I make)

Is it worth sacrificing being home for a decade to stay home all day for an additional decade? I am in my early 30s with a wife and a 20 month old girl.

MikeBear

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Re: Would you take the job?
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2014, 11:31:46 PM »

Is it worth sacrificing being home for a decade to stay home all day for an additional decade? I am in my early 30s with a wife and a 20 month old girl.

Not a chance.

IMO you'd be making a BIG mistake going with this job because of the travel and being away from home so much while having a wife and young daughter. It is NOT worth the extra money, if you destroy your family life.

EricL

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Re: Would you take the job?
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2014, 11:35:50 PM »
Can't always have both.  I say stick to your current job and figure other way to make or save more to cover the loss.  You can't buy back hours with your wife and child.  Disclaimer: I'm single so this is not an informed opinion.

MsRichLife

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Re: Would you take the job?
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2014, 11:40:12 PM »
Is it worth sacrificing being home for a decade to stay home all day for an additional decade? I am in my early 30s with a wife and a 20 month old girl.

Only you can decide what's best for your family, but there is just no way I would do this. Kids are only little for a short time and I wouldn't want to miss it.

Money Bags

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Re: Would you take the job?
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2014, 06:40:13 AM »
Thanks for the replies.

My brother is an airline  pilot and  told  me the same thing. He is a hyper-consumer, so I wondered what the frugal types would say. He hates being gone 3-4 nights and  says he misses a lot of his two boys lives (3 and 1 year old). His exact words were... "No amount of money is worth missing some stuff, and I have missed some of those things, so trust me, don't do it"

My job allows me to work 6am to 230. I am sure a lot of that time at home would be sorely missed. I thought about selling real estate on the side but then I would also be gone running around, watching my neighbor do that right now. She leaves constantly and pretty much has a nanny.

frugaliknowit

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Re: Would you take the job?
« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2014, 07:15:06 AM »
The schedule does not sound sustainable.  You could do it for a while.  If you did take it, you will probably quit within 5 years.