Author Topic: Would a Mustachian move to Vermont? Or use medicaid?  (Read 2499 times)

liquidbanana

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Would a Mustachian move to Vermont? Or use medicaid?
« on: July 02, 2012, 11:26:46 PM »
So, it's not set in stone, but Vermont is moving toward single payer healthcare. Where I live, a really comprehensive health insurance can easily cost my family $1200 a month. All other expenses are well below the national average, however.

Considering groceries, utilities, real estate and property taxes are going to cost more, would it in any way be worth it to move to Vermont for the health care, especially if you have a pre-existing condition? Or would a high-deductible HSA plan in a cheap living area be wiser?

And on another note...

If this obamacare stuff goes into effect in 2014, people making incomes at 133% or under will qualify for medicaid. Assets aren't counted in determining eligibility. Hypothetically, if you've reached FI, but are living on interest income that is under the 133% poverty level threshold, would you take advantage of medicaid...or...would that just be evil considering you have voluntarily chosen that level of income?

skyrefuge

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Re: Would a Mustachian move to Vermont? Or use medicaid?
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2012, 08:16:49 AM »
I just posted a general analysis of the ACA in the General subforum, and based on that, here's my specific take for your situation.  I don't know anything about the plans in Vermont, but it seems like a lot of what you're looking for under such a plan may likely be available nationwide in 2014, so I'm not sure if it's worth moving to another (more expensive) state to get it vs. just waiting until 2014.  If the ACA gets repealed AND this Vermont plan goes into effect, then it might be worth considering, but it sounds like both of those are at least mid-sized "ifs" at this point.

As far as accepting the government money, I certainly won't feel any shame over it, since it will be the government removing my rational choice to spend less in the first place.   And they're giving money to families making up to $90k/year, so it's not like it's only "the poor" and Mustachians that will be in that boat, it will pretty much be "normal". 

liquidbanana

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Re: Would a Mustachian move to Vermont? Or use medicaid?
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2012, 11:22:03 AM »
Thank you for the analysis in the other post. I'm still a little confused...lol. The $1200 premium is what my employer offers, so my understanding is that I would not qualify for any subsidies since my employer offers insurance. I hope I'm wrong, though!

NestEggChick (formerly PFgal)

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Re: Would a Mustachian move to Vermont? Or use medicaid?
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2012, 10:03:42 PM »
Keep in mind that the Supreme Court's ruling means that the federal government can no longer force state expansions of Medicaid.  Each state's Medicaid will have different qualifying requirements, so be sure you understand your own state's requirements as well as Vermont's requirements for whichever system they have.  This could make a huge difference.

Of course, a lot could chance in the next 5 months, so we can't predict where things will stand when the dust settles.

herisff

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Re: Would a Mustachian move to Vermont? Or use medicaid?
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2012, 07:25:43 AM »
Keep in mind that the Supreme Court's ruling means that the federal government can no longer force state expansions of Medicaid.  Each state's Medicaid will have different qualifying requirements, so be sure you understand your own state's requirements as well as Vermont's requirements for whichever system they have.  This could make a huge difference.
The other thing to consider is that what is covered under Medicaid varies by state. There is a *lot* that is not covered under Medicaid and Medicare (although more is covered under Medicare). Before you decide to go this route, be very clear what is covered and what is excluded or only partially covered under whatever insurance plan you choose (private, Medicaid, etc). In my state, not much is covered under Medicaid and physicians get paid so little with it that they limit how many patients with Medicaid they will see. In general, private insurance is accepted by most physicians and has more extensive coverage.