Author Topic: Working from home after being in corporate life  (Read 3460 times)

Sacadoh

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Working from home after being in corporate life
« on: February 13, 2014, 04:47:40 PM »
I have a chance to take a better paying, albeit higher risk, job which will allow me to work at or near home. I have worked in big organisations to date - for about 25 years.

My wife is at home, as is my youngest child of 2 years old. Has anyone made the shift after a long period in a big team environment to working at home.

Any tips on adjusting to not being part of a big network or how to keep focused when there is no big brother watching?

I may take a small office near my home as I am not sure putting a deal together while the 2 year old is pounding on the door to play with Dad is realistic.

doyouknowwhy

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Re: Working from home after being in corporate life
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2014, 05:34:22 PM »
That's great!  I love WFH jobs.

Fuzz

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Re: Working from home after being in corporate life
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2014, 05:36:22 PM »
Google co-working space for your area. Might be a nice fit. I do it and like it.

beekeeper

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Re: Working from home after being in corporate life
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2014, 11:12:04 PM »
The best tip I know is discipline: have working hours, work during them, and then stop.

You might also be interested in the book "Remote": https://37signals.com/remote/

libertarian4321

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Re: Working from home after being in corporate life
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2014, 11:27:57 PM »
I worked as a corporate drone for years, working for a large consulting firm.  Hated it.

Retired in 2006, then was invited to work for a smaller company for less money, but I could work my own hours and work from home.

I've been doing that for about 4 years now and love it.

The important things are:

1) don't work too little- it can be easy to get distracted at home.  Make sure you get the work done.
2) don't work too much.  You need to set hours and quit at "quitting time."  It can be too easy to work all night if your "office" is 30 feet from your bedroom.

ShortInSeattle

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Re: Working from home after being in corporate life
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2014, 10:57:05 AM »
This comic sums it up: http://theoatmeal.com/comics/working_home (not work appropriate...)

:)

I made the switch seven years ago and it has been great. I also know people who can't really succeed at it.

1) Set up a space to work, and set boundaries with any other residents. Shut the door.
2) Start each day with a list of what must get done. Do that first.
3) Enjoy the perks! The ability to have lunch at home, to throw in a load of laundry at 2pm between emails.
4) Know how your company is monitoring your work, and keep them happy.

If you are able to work without your boss breathing down your neck you'll do fine. If you're the type who can't resist the siren call of Netflix or who will freak out after 5-6 hours working in solitude it will be harder.

mboulder

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Re: Working from home after being in corporate life
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2014, 11:14:41 AM »
I worked from home for 4 or 5 years in the early 2000's. Aside from the great info from others, I noticed:

- I had to be very clear with my wife that working from home didn't mean I could just break away and do house chores at any time. She had a strong urge to assign me more because I was working from home and "the laundry only takes a few minutes...". Communication about expectations and scheduling time for chores (outside of work hours) solved this one.

- I got no social interaction at all throughout the day, no water cooler talk or bs'ing with coworkers. Many days, aside for the occasional phone conference, I didn't hear another voice. So when my wife came home, I would gab gab gab gab gab. Drove her nuts sometimes. ;)

- Out of sight, out of mind. I found that, not being around coworkers or my boss, nobody tended to see my accomplishments or even know what tasks I was working on. After I noticed that people who worked in the office tended to get more kudos, I really ramped up communicating my accomplishments to my team, other teams and upper management too. Basically selling myself.

- It is really tempting to work through lunch... then work through breakfast... then work through dinner. It just kind of snuck up on me, when I noticed I was working all these hours straight with few, short breaks. Set boundaries, and avoid the temptation.

I did find that my morale improved while working from home.

Thegoblinchief

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Re: Working from home after being in corporate life
« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2014, 03:53:43 PM »
You've gotten good advice so far. In my experience, it's easier to work too much from home than too little.

Depending on your house layout, is there a good home office where you can lock yourself up for the day or at least to take calls? When my wife was in grad school, I made her a little office in one corner of our bedroom (normally our desks are out in the living area) so she could lock the door and keep the kids out.

No commute is great.

Sacadoh

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Re: Working from home after being in corporate life
« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2014, 06:16:32 PM »
Thanks to everyone. Plenty to think about.

I wont really have a boss as such so wont be being monitored.

I will miss being around other professionals but will be on the phone/email all day so wont lose the people contact.

I have the room at home but distraction by Mrs S & the kids may make a local office nearby the right solution.