Author Topic: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?  (Read 10223 times)

Uncephalized

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 136
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Phoenix, AZ
Hi all,

I am looking to replace my current bicycle, a mid-90s Trek 520 road bike, with something that I will get more use out of. I have a few constraints and would like some opinions, since I am not too knowledgeable about the available options.

1) I am looking for a reasonably comfortable ride. For me this mostly means a riding position that is fairly upright. The main reason is that I have a problem with my neck that causes extreme stiffness and bad headaches if I spend too much time leaning over and holding my head up at an awkward angle, which is a problem I have experienced with all road bikes I have used. I also don't want to develop kyphosis from bad posture.

2) I (obviously, this is the MMM forum!) don't want to spend too much money. $500 would be an absolute maximum, and less is more!

3) It doesn't need to have 1000 gears, and in fact an integrated shifter hub might be just the ticket as far as simplicity and minimal maintenance. I live in Phoenix so steep hills are not an issue, but there are some hills and I plan to use it for pulling a trailer sometimes, so I still want gears.

I guess what I'm looking for is an all-around city bike that's not super-heavy, has a fairly comfortable upright riding position, minimal maintenance, and would be suitable for pulling a trailer on grocery runs and for a 30-mile round trip to work, once I get my conditioning up. I plan on sticking to paved surfaces 99% of the time. Thanks in advance for advice, Mustachians!

grantmeaname

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4743
  • Age: 26
  • Location: NYC
  • Cast me away from yesterday's things
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2012, 02:38:43 PM »
I would imagine that 15 miles is long enough that you'll probably be hurting if you do it regularly on a cruiser instead of a road bike, but I could be wrong. On a road bike, the seat has to be the way it is so you don't permanently damage yourself (to quote a denizen of my tech forum, sit on your bones, not your assmeat). Perhaps talk with a chiropractor about your neck? As for the kyphosis, I wouldn't worry about it coming from bike riding, and I've never heard anything of the sort, but you could talk to a chiropractor if you were concerned.

If you deflate the tires from the recommended spec (100-120 psi) to something substantially lower (70-80 psi), your ride will be much smoother. Bike shorts will help too; in addition to making your butt more comfortable, you'll put less weight on your hands and feet because it hurts less to sit.
If you raise the handlebars, you may be able to hold your head upright enough that your headaches go away (the other way to change your back angly, lowering the seat, is less than ideal for your knees).

gooki

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2373
  • Location: NZ
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2012, 03:37:55 PM »
I would imagine that 15 miles is long enough that you'll probably be hurting if you do it regularly on a cruiser instead of a road bike, but I could be wrong.

I'd disagree with this. A good commuting bike will not make you hurt any more on longer distances.

I can't recommend any specific models to look at, but I've recently moved from a road bike to a single speed commuter (KHS Urban Soul http://www.khsbicycles.com/06_urban_series_a.htm), and toughly enjoy the more upright position. It sounds like you know what you want, so I'd be going around a  few bike shops and see what they recommend,

Uncephalized

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 136
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Phoenix, AZ
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2012, 03:40:32 PM »
Maybe I didn't give enough information. I'm definitely not looking for a cruiser. I don't need to be totally upright, just not leaned forward at a very low angle while I ride. So I want something where the handlebars are higher than the seat by a few inches, so that I don't need to lean my weight on my hands too much, and my head is in a more neutral position rather than craned upwards to look ahead. I still want to be able to move at a reasonably good pace. I don't mind a narrow or hard seat, that's just something to get used to as you ride more. I'm using a Brooks leather saddle on my bike right now that is quite stiff. It's the high amount of leaning that gets me.

My other concern is that I really dislike the downtube shifters on my bike--I end up not using them because I find them such a PITA to use, so I don't get any benefit out of the gearing on the bike. I want something with shifters on the bars.

EDIT: gooki, those KHS bikes are the general type of thing I am thinking of. Thanks for the link!
« Last Edit: June 14, 2012, 03:52:28 PM by Uncephalized »

smalllife

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 983
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2012, 05:07:00 PM »
If you want to keep expenses down and plan to be riding more than a few miles at a time, you'll get more bang for your buck getting a well-built vintage bike and making any necessary repairs.  Especially when you want to put that many miles on it, going cheap isn't the way to go.  (Frugal and cheap being two very different things)

Take a look in the archives over at "Lovely Bike": her newer posts aren't quite as on topic but she goes over biking basics really well.  From your description it sounds like you want "English upright" - not hunched over but not bolt upright.   Touring bikes might also be a good idea. 

Uncephalized

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 136
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Phoenix, AZ
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2012, 05:59:53 PM »
If you want to keep expenses down and plan to be riding more than a few miles at a time, you'll get more bang for your buck getting a well-built vintage bike and making any necessary repairs.  Especially when you want to put that many miles on it, going cheap isn't the way to go.  (Frugal and cheap being two very different things)
Do you think that the quality of midrange city bikes is not good enough to be durable? Old bikes are often very heavy... I don't think $500 is "cheap".

grantmeaname

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4743
  • Age: 26
  • Location: NYC
  • Cast me away from yesterday's things
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2012, 06:47:08 PM »
Old bikes aren't that much heavier than new bikes after you count the rider in. You can get a relatively nice bike for $200 or $300 on craigslist if you're willing to get something older.

Uncephalized

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 136
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Phoenix, AZ
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2012, 07:04:47 PM »
Old bikes aren't that much heavier than new bikes after you count the rider in. You can get a relatively nice bike for $200 or $300 on craigslist if you're willing to get something older.
Well he said "vintage", but sure. I am willing to go used or new, whatever makes sense. I was just trying to get a feel for if anyone had a specific bike they really recommend or what--brands to look for, that sort of thing.

grantmeaname

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4743
  • Age: 26
  • Location: NYC
  • Cast me away from yesterday's things
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2012, 07:17:44 PM »
Something like this from the greatest website on earth would do you well. Bikesdirect has lots of good generic taiwanese bikes, too

gooki

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2373
  • Location: NZ
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2012, 07:32:38 PM »
Do you think that the quality of midrange city bikes is not good enough to be durable? Old bikes are often very heavy... I don't think $500 is "cheap".

I paid $225 USD for my KHS Urban Soul brand new, delivered. It's a steel frame bike, but isn't noticeable heavier than my carbon fibre racing bike it replaced.

So I'm all for buying new, provided you're getting good value for money. Just be aware, not all new bikes are lighter, and I wouldn't pay significantly more for saving a  few grams.

Along with the KHS models, the GT Traffic series should have what you want.
http://road.cc/content/review/25506-gt-traffic-20

http://www.gtbicycles.com/2012/bikes/urban/city/2012-traffic-i8
« Last Edit: June 14, 2012, 07:42:11 PM by gooki »

skyrefuge

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1007
  • Location: Suburban Chicago, IL
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #10 on: June 14, 2012, 08:31:25 PM »
you'll get more bang for your buck getting a well-built vintage bike and making any necessary repairs....Touring bikes might also be a good idea.

heh...like, I dunno, a mid-90s Trek 520?  :-)  The 520 is a much-loved classic, an ideal all-around bike, so it almost seems silly to get rid of it (in fact here's a thread from someone looking to do the exact opposite, buy a 1995 Trek 520 to replace his ~2010 Specialized Sirrus commuter/hybrid!) 

It sounds like the main problems with it for the OP are that the handlebars are too low, and the downtube shifters are annoying; both problems might be solvable, perhaps for less money than even a used new bike.

The handlebars can be raised with a Stem Riser or a new stem (just examples, make sure to google for cheaper/more-suitable options).

The downtube shifters can be made into almost-as-good-as integrated shifters with Kelley Take Offs.

Matt K

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 332
  • Location: Canada
    • Krull Photography
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #11 on: June 15, 2012, 06:26:16 AM »
Skyrefuge kinda beat me to it.

If the frame fits you, keep it. The 520 is a classic for good reason. I'd keep it.

As for back/neck position, get a flat-bar (mountain bike style bar) and a raised stem. This will also solve your shifter problem since you can then mount a pair of mountain-bike style trigger shifters. Good quality trigger shifters for road groups cost under $100. The handlebar should be under $50, $20 for quality grips, $30 for new brake levers (if not integrated into the shifters) and $40 for a new stem. Sell your old bar an shifters for $20 and the whole project comes under $200.

If you want more comfort (if something like the KHS is starting to give you a bit of bike lust) look at changing your tires. How wide are your tires, and how wide is your clearance? I think you can fit 32mm wide tires on there with fenders. Certainly 28mm. I ride 28s @ 80psi and they make a huge difference over 25mm @ 110psi. You can probably run 32mm at 60psi for even more road comfort with minimal increase in drag.
Michlin City 700x28mm and 700x32mm tires are $20 each and provide great puncture resistance, good comfort, and high visibility (built in high-vis white wall).

Uncephalized

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 136
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Phoenix, AZ
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #12 on: June 15, 2012, 07:52:35 AM »
Hmm, sounds like more than one person thinks I should keep my bike! That probably is the best idea cost-wise. A couple more questions for the bike gurus:

My shifters are not indexed--indexing is done by the shifter, not the derailleur, right? So if I get new trigger-style shifters, they should work fine with the old derailleurs?

I guess it doesn't matter if I am getting new bars and stem, but my stem only has one screw on the handlebar clamp. How do you actually get they handlebar and stem apart in this case? The stem is all one piece (no separate clamp piece pops off, it just wraps all the way around the bar), so it seems like you'd need to remove the screw to loosen and then slide the handlebar all the way out along its length, which would also require removing the brake lever on one side of the bar to fit it through. That doesn't seem right. Does the bar clamp actually just bend open wide enough to pull the bar out directly or what? I don't want to damage anything making the swap since I can sell the old parts.

Also, anybody have a favorite type of bike trailer? Is there a big difference in feel between the single-wheel and two-wheel kind? I'd think the two-wheel ones would be more stable with heavier loads...

Matt K

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 332
  • Location: Canada
    • Krull Photography
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #13 on: June 15, 2012, 08:28:07 AM »
My shifters are not indexed--indexing is done by the shifter, not the derailleur, right? So if I get new trigger-style shifters, they should work fine with the old derailleurs?
Indexing is done by the shifters. All you need to do is make sure that your shifters are the same ratio as the rear deraileur (shimano and sram are generally speaking not compatible, and I'm not sure on shimano road vs shimano mountain). Worst case scenario you also replace the rear deraileur. For road bike applications, the shimano alivio integrated shifters/brakes for mtbs are really good (if your bike uses V-brakes, I don't think they are the right pull length for cantis, but I could be wrong) and cost next to nothing ($30 for the pair). Add another $40 for the deraileur and you're set.
If it is the lack of indexing, not the position of the down tube shifters that bothers you, you can buy new shimano downtube shifters using the latest technology. They cost under $100 and give you the wonders of indexing. But, you're still reaching between your knees. I'm a huge fan of mtb style trigger shifters in traffic.

Quote
Also, anybody have a favorite type of bike trailer? Is there a big difference in feel between the single-wheel and two-wheel kind? I'd think the two-wheel ones would be more stable with heavier loads...
I just picked up a used Bob Yak for $150. It is a single wheel design. Loading the trailer (and attaching it) are not as easy as a two wheel design (since it isn't as stable). Once on the bike, it is fantastic. It rocks when riding down pot-holed roads, since I can maneuver it between holes just by riding my bike between the holes. Three wheel tracks = three times as many pot holes to avoid. Would I trade it for a two wheel design? nope. Would I recommend against buying a two wheel design? Nope, they work, and loading stuff is easier on them. Really, you'll get used to which ever you buy - I wouldn't stress about it.

Uncephalized

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 136
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Phoenix, AZ
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #14 on: June 15, 2012, 08:35:13 AM »
My shifters are not indexed--indexing is done by the shifter, not the derailleur, right? So if I get new trigger-style shifters, they should work fine with the old derailleurs?
Indexing is done by the shifters. All you need to do is make sure that your shifters are the same ratio as the rear deraileur (shimano and sram are generally speaking not compatible, and I'm not sure on shimano road vs shimano mountain). Worst case scenario you also replace the rear deraileur. For road bike applications, the shimano alivio integrated shifters/brakes for mtbs are really good (if your bike uses V-brakes, I don't think they are the right pull length for cantis, but I could be wrong) and cost next to nothing ($30 for the pair). Add another $40 for the deraileur and you're set.
If it is the lack of indexing, not the position of the down tube shifters that bothers you, you can buy new shimano downtube shifters using the latest technology. They cost under $100 and give you the wonders of indexing. But, you're still reaching between your knees. I'm a huge fan of mtb style trigger shifters in traffic.
Cool beans. It is mostly the reaching down and taking my hands off the bars that makes me feel unsafe on anything but a nice clear straightaway. So I never end up shifting when I could get the most benefit out of it. Indexing is just a bonus but I figure if I am getting new shifters anyway there's no point going with old tech.

Quote
Also, anybody have a favorite type of bike trailer? Is there a big difference in feel between the single-wheel and two-wheel kind? I'd think the two-wheel ones would be more stable with heavier loads...
I just picked up a used Bob Yak for $150. It is a single wheel design. Loading the trailer (and attaching it) are not as easy as a two wheel design (since it isn't as stable). Once on the bike, it is fantastic. It rocks when riding down pot-holed roads, since I can maneuver it between holes just by riding my bike between the holes. Three wheel tracks = three times as many pot holes to avoid. Would I trade it for a two wheel design? nope. Would I recommend against buying a two wheel design? Nope, they work, and loading stuff is easier on them. Really, you'll get used to which ever you buy - I wouldn't stress about it.
Makes sense. I didn't think about the obstacle-avoidance thing, though I had thought about the fact that a two-wheeler will make you wider than a single. No stress here, I just like to learn from people who have been there before me so I don't waste unnecessary time and money. :-)

skyrefuge

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1007
  • Location: Suburban Chicago, IL
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #15 on: June 15, 2012, 09:17:42 AM »
As for back/neck position, get a flat-bar (mountain bike style bar) and a raised stem. This will also solve your shifter problem since you can then mount a pair of mountain-bike style trigger shifters. Good quality trigger shifters for road groups cost under $100. The handlebar should be under $50, $20 for quality grips, $30 for new brake levers (if not integrated into the shifters) and $40 for a new stem. Sell your old bar an shifters for $20 and the whole project comes under $200.

Unfortunately the stupid bike world still divides everything between "road" and "mountain", so it's not as easy to swap "mountain" components onto a road bike as it should be.  Indexed mountain shifters are compatible with rear derailers, but not with front derailers.  Front derailers on road bikes expect less cable to be pulled to move an equivalent amount.  Same with brakes, the cantilever brakes on the 520 expect less cable to be pulled than V-brakes on a mountain/hybrid bike, so road levers pull less cable. 

I actually have the opposite situation on my bike, I have a mountain front derailer/crank, and road shifters, and it means that I can only shift between two chainrings instead of all three (I did this intentionally, and I can use the barrel-adjuster to then select which two chainrings the shifter chooses between).  Similarly, I would *like* to get V-brakes instead of cantilevers, but I can't, because my road levers wouldn't pull enough cable to properly move the brakes.  Maybe Uncephalized's reverse situation works a little better (using mountain controls to actuate road components), and a non-indexed mountain shifter (if such a thing exists) will cover more than enough range for a road front-derailer, and mountain brake levers will pull more than enough cable to actuate cantilever brakes.

But it's still a little iffy, so that's why I suggested the particular items that I did.  It stays entirely with road components, it's less work, and it's significantly less expensive.  A stem riser is $15-$20.  Just loosen the top bolt on the original stem, lift it out with the handlebars attached, drop in the riser, and drop the original stem into the riser.  You might have to lengthen your cables/housing, but you don't have to remove/change the bars (and yes, removing the shifter and bar tape and sliding the handlebar out is the only way to do it on a stem like yours, it's kind of a PITA).  And the Kelly Take Offs kit is $80, and you can re-use your existing downtube shifters.  Total cost ~$100. 

Another option for the shifters is to get bar-end shifters (which is what Trek 520s come with these days), but those still aren't as convenient as the Take Offs would be, so that's why I didn't recommend that option (and I don't think you can just stuff "downtube shifters" into your bar ends, so you'd have to buy new bar-end shifters).  Here's a pretty convincing review on the Take Offs, I'm seriously considering getting them if/when my STI shifters finally wear out.

I think you can fit 32mm wide tires on there with fenders. Certainly 28mm.

Yeah, a 520 should be able to accommodate 37mm tires, w/ fenders.

Uncephalized

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 136
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Phoenix, AZ
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #16 on: June 15, 2012, 10:39:35 AM »
I think I have 1" tires on it right now. I'd have to check to make sure. The ride quality is fine (as I recall--haven't ridden it in a while!); I don't feel the need to put slower tires on it. I think the steel frames are a little better than Al at smoothing the ride out? I just changed the tires a few months after I got the bike and haven't ridden very many miles (like <50) since then, and I store it inside, so they're basically new. I do need to get some fenders and a front rack on it though...

Matt K

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 332
  • Location: Canada
    • Krull Photography
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #17 on: June 15, 2012, 12:57:43 PM »
Yea, the road/mtb parts compatibility is always confusing. So, I did a search for pure road bike parts:

Shimano flatbar trigger shifters. Designed for road drive trains (3x8), with integrated brake levers that work with V brake or canti, for $42 a pair (plus shipping from the UK, so best to try and source them locally first).
http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=38725

$45 gets to an adjustable stem (if you have a threadless headset - that is, the stem clamps on to the fork stem)
http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=39262

$25 gets you a flat bar http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=77562
depending on your own comfort, you may prefer a bar with a slight bend towards you, to put less bend on your wrists. I've got a friend who swears by bars liek this http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=31680

$10 for grips http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=19265

So as long as you currently have a threadless headset and an 8-speed shimano road drivetrain, you're set for $125 + shipping (or same general after shipping price from a good LBS).

Bakari

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1796
  • Age: 39
  • Location: Oakland, CA
  • Veggie Powered Handyman
    • The Flamboyant Introvert
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #18 on: June 15, 2012, 01:41:58 PM »
What you are looking for is pretty much exactly what I had in mind when I wrote this:
http://biodieselhauling.blogspot.com/2012/01/buying-bikes-from-craigslist.html

at the request of another MMM reader who was looking to replace a bike.
Even if you decide to buy new, most of the same information will apply.

Although I 3rd the suggestion of keeping what you have.  It was a good bike (and 20 years newer than my ride!)

I have an adjustable stem so that I have a more upright riding position, but I kept my curved road bars, which give you more potential hand positions, and are therefor more comfortable for long rides (when your hands get tired, you can move them).  With a new stem, a road bar can be just as high as a flat bar.

I had 105 STI integrated indexed shifters on my racing bike, and having ridden them extensively, I don't see any reason to upgrade to indexed shifters.  Not only are they more expensive, but they are much harder to adjust and maintain, don't last as long, are more complex to use, and have to be matched to the number of gears you have.  Friction shifters have none of these problems, and you can buy replacements at any bikeshop for a few dollars, without having to also replace brakes or grips or anything else.

The more you ride, the easier it will be to take your hand off to shift.  Its a worthwhile skill for all sorts of things, and will make you a better and safer rider to be able to anyway.  Plus then you can reach for your waterbottle, cellphone to snap a picture of a license plate, jacket when its cold - and use your arms to signal your turns (esp. left turns).
It also makes it much easier to turn and look behind you for traffic or riding companions.

Just start trying riding with one hand as much as possible, until it feels natural.  It will be just like learning to ride in the first place - scary at first, then after a while something will click and it will be easy for ever after.  Then you can start working on riding with no hands.  Same process.
Then you can work on riding a unicycle ;)

I didn't notice if someone already answered this, but your stem probably requires you to remove the brakes and bar tape (or grips) on one side, and slide the bar out.  Many of the adjustable angle stems will have two bolts, making it easier to install.

I think you could make your bike work for you for under $20.

zoltani

  • Guest
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #19 on: June 15, 2012, 04:56:57 PM »
One option is to move to bar end shifters. 

I am also in the "if it fits keep it" camp.  The 520 is a touring bike and should be set up with a french fit, meaning that the bars and saddle are the same height.  If that is not the case then maybe the frame is too small for you, but I am not expert in bike fit. 

You should be able to move your stem up since it is likely a quill stem.  If there is not enough post to move the stem up then you might want to look into the nitto tectonic stem as they can be raised to ridiculous heights (225 mm). 

As bakari noted, you probably have to remove the tape and lever from one side of the bar to remove it and cahnge the stem.  AFAIK there aren't quill stems with removable face plates. 

 

Bakari

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1796
  • Age: 39
  • Location: Oakland, CA
  • Veggie Powered Handyman
    • The Flamboyant Introvert
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #20 on: June 16, 2012, 07:33:45 AM »
They are quill stems with removable plates, but it wouldn't come stock, esp on an older bike.
The one I have now is quill, adjustable height and angle, with two bolts to hold the bar.

Uncephalized

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 136
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Phoenix, AZ
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #21 on: June 17, 2012, 11:35:52 AM »
OK, so after reading replies and thinking about it some more, what I really want to do is put on a taller stem or a riser and keep my drop bars, and move the shifters onto the bars with those Kelly Take Offs--I think I will stick with friction shifters since apparently indexing causes more maintenance hassle and is much more expensive. I probably need to replace my cables and housings anyway so I can just get longer ones when I do that. Thanks for all the advice guys! Next up I'll need to decide on some panniers and possibly a trailer for groceries and errands...

jawisco

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 194
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #22 on: June 17, 2012, 12:30:52 PM »
You are making the right choices - new stem with road handlebars are the ideal, especially if you are riding on pavement.  My girlfriend got the adjustable stem and loves it.

Check out some vintage bike places and look for bar-end shifters - dirt cheap if you can find them this way, no indexing hassles, and pretty much bombproof...

Sparky

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 163
Re: Advice on a bicycle -- can I get some Mustachians to weigh in?
« Reply #23 on: June 20, 2012, 04:51:50 AM »
Basically without getting into any sort of tech jargon: Go to your local bike shop and give them your problem and they'll be happy to help you out. The Trek 520 are wicked bikes, I lust over them all the time.....