Author Topic: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston  (Read 13712 times)

Bartleby

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Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« on: April 17, 2012, 07:19:35 AM »
Hi everyone, what are your tips for inexpensive moving?  I am finishing medical school and moving to Boston for residency, so I have pretty much one studio apartment's worth of stuff.  I also have access to a car and can make the drive to and from Boston for about $150 round trip, so I can take a few small essentials that way if I want to.

Basically, the things I want to move are: computer and electronic equipment, desk, bed, dresser, futon, chairs (desk and small reclining chair), kitchen appliances (microwave, blender, rice cooker, slow cooker, toaster oven, toaster), camping equipment, road bike (value ~$750 new), and a few other miscellaneous items.  I am sure I could fit the computer/electronics, the road bike, and maybe a few personal items in a car, which would leave me with a lot to buy all over again (mostly furniture).

Uhaul rental (fee plus gas) comes to about $683 one way to Boston, and other companies seem comparable based on online quotes.  I could also just pack up a single car (which will stay with me in Boston for at least a while) and make the move for $75, leaving me needing to buy most things over again.  As I have been a student pretty much since age five I would like to keep this move as inexpensive as possible, does anyone have advice on options I may be overlooking or underestimating?

(By the way, I would ditch the bed and the furniture but my fiancee wants to keep them and it is tough for me to ask her to sit/sleep on the ground whenever she comes to visit!)

Edit:  I made the move and left an update, see reply #23!
« Last Edit: June 17, 2012, 07:18:42 AM by Bartleby »

twinge

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2012, 07:44:24 AM »
If you're moving at the end of the academic year, be aware that many grad students in the area (particularly international ones) sell their studio apts worth of goods.  Boston/Cambridge is FULL of students and there's an amazing abundance come May/June. These are often surprising high quality at decent prices. Harvard's graduate student housing complexes have a particular lively trade, but Craigslist is full too. It would probably be cheapest to pack a car of your most precious items, sell the rest and repurchase used in the area.

trammatic

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2012, 08:29:54 AM »
If you're up for some driving, you can rent a cargo van from Enterprise.  They'll hold a surprising amount of stuff, and if you can do the round-trip in 24 hours, they'll only charge you one day.  (If you're up in NOVA, it's about an 8 hour drive...if you're town at VT, it's closer to 12...)  The rental price is about $75.

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2012, 12:45:27 PM »
If you're thinking of bringing your car up to Boston and keeping it there for a while, you should make sure you have a parking spot. Where exactly are you moving? Do you have off-street parking? Will you need to pay for a parking permit or a parking spot? Depending on where you live, parking can be really expensive or it can be included in your rent/free street access. Public transportation in Boston is great, while driving and parking can be terrible.

Also, do you really need the camping equipment? Unless you are planning to keep your car, how are you planning to get to a camping location? I guess you could take a bus/train and then cab it or bike, but do you really think you'll have time and money for that as a resident?

Bartleby

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2012, 01:25:00 PM »
Hey all, thanks for the great replies!  To further clarify I will be near the Longwood medical area, technically in Brookline but within a ~10 min walk of BWH and BIDMC. I had planned to go car-free but I was assigned to four months of community rotations in Wellesley over the course of the next year and with the hours I will work public transportation is apparently inadequate (it seems Sundays and holidays pose the biggest problems, so I would have to get cabs at times).  I think a 10 mile bike ride each way in city traffic (probably close to 5 AM while I am likely going to be exhausted anyhow) would be too much.  For housing/parking I just looked for the best combination of location, price, and liveability I could find and happened to get a place with a free parking spot so it would not be hard to keep the car for those rotations.

twinge, that is a good point about the student move-out.  I hadn't taken that into account.  How would you move things like a bed or a desk within Boston though?  It would be tough without a truck or large vehicle, and all my family and friends who could lend me one are in Virginia.

trammatic, good thought on the cargo van.  I live in Charlottesville so with traffic it's easily a 11.5 hour drive, but even renting the van for two days might come in cheaper than a uhaul.  If a mattress fits in one of those that might be the best option.

And Nancy, I agree, driving in Boston scares the crap out of me!  People are several orders of magnitude more aggressive/reckless than they are in small town Virginia.  I hadn't planned to do it, but until I get those community hospital months out of the way next year I might have to.  I wondered about the camping equipment as well and it isn't a must-have, but I will get a total of four weeks vacation next year and would love to do at least a little car camping, and maybe even make a short trip out occasionally during the odd "golden weekend" where I have two well-rested days off.  I don't have much equipment in total, it packs down into a single box for the most part.

fruplicity

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2012, 02:00:17 PM »
This won't work for really big items, but using your car for the main move and shipping boxes of everything else is how we moved from Boston to FL for cheap a few years ago.

Hope you enjoy the area!

Daley

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2012, 02:23:44 PM »
This is actually a topic I've been meaning to share on for a while now: affordable cross-country moving.

The last time the wife and I relocated, we priced moving lines, haul it yourself options and the like and discovered ABF U-Pack through movingscam.com's forums.

Hands down, one of the easiest, least stressful moves we've ever done... and it was cheaper than renting a U-Haul alone, never mind the gas. The only thing to remember is that ABF is freight, so you need to pack things securely and protect furniture well. Your renters/homeowners insurance should protect against any major damages so long as you let them know you're moving. They stand by their quotes, their drivers are helpful and punctual, and so long as you plan ahead, you're flexible on pickup and delivery dates and are conscientious of parking situations, you're golden and can save a ton of cash. They drop off a trailer or cube(s), you pack the stuff up, they take it away. Easy as that. A review of our experience can be read here.

Also, screw U-Haul. After trying Penske, I'll never go back. Better trucks, cheaper rentals, and more professional.

Bartleby

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2012, 04:50:49 PM »
Shipping boxes as a supplement to moving could work, is it pretty cheap to ship (say) a heavy microwave?  It does seem odd that buying a new one with shipping would be cheaper than just shipping the one I already have, so there could be some cost savings there.  If I could ship the bed that might solve my problems (I could probably ditch most of the rest).

I.P., that is the kind of service I was hoping to find out about!  Unfortunately it seems like their estimate is really high ($1102).  I just entered moving from Charlottesville to Brookline (next to Boston, technically where my studio is) within the next two months and they came up with that, with "five feet of trailer space."  Am I missing something?  It's not a bad deal, but the UHaul would be around half that price.

I will also try to read up on local reviews of the various truck rental places, I have heard horror stories about each company so I expect lots of people have bad experiences all around.  The couple of in-town moves I helped friends with went okay with the Charlottesville Uhaul, they seemed pretty legit.

Daley

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2012, 05:33:18 PM »
I.P., that is the kind of service I was hoping to find out about!  Unfortunately it seems like their estimate is really high ($1102).  I just entered moving from Charlottesville to Brookline (next to Boston, technically where my studio is) within the next two months and they came up with that, with "five feet of trailer space."  Am I missing something?  It's not a bad deal, but the UHaul would be around half that price.

Try giving ABF a call directly. Be flexible on pickup and delivery dates, and price home to home, home to terminal, terminal to home, and terminal to terminal. Frequently, cutting the home end points out will save far more money than a local truck rental cost. Also, be sure to get quotes without moving help and aim to keep storage costs to a minimum. Depending on the size of your stuff, look into the price difference between linear space in a trailer and their ReloCubes. You've gotta be careful with the cubes when estimating space, though. Screw up on estimates for that, and the price can shoot up quickly.

Edit: Look over Movingscam.com as well. I haven't had any personal experience with Broadway Express, but it might not hurt to get a second DIY quote from another company.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2012, 05:47:33 PM by I.P. Daley »

Bartleby

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2012, 04:37:35 PM »
Thanks, I will give them a call and see if they can work something out!  I will also take a look at movinscam, I have not heard of that site before this thread.

velocistar237

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #10 on: April 20, 2012, 10:54:58 AM »
A friend of mine put a trailer hitch on his car and bought a trailer off of Craigslist. When he got to Boston, he sold the trailer on Craigslist.

I think Brookline doesn't let people park on the street overnight, but it sounds like you've already found a place with off-street parking.

Could you put your futon mattress directly on the floor? That's where they started out (well, on tatami). You can get rid of the frame if you have one. We have a Japanese futon that we fold into thirds and store behind our sofa, but it's half as thick as the typical American futon.

Could you work out a mix of commuter rail, Zipcar, carpool, borrowing, and bicycle for your Wellesley commute? For example, if you get there at 5am, you could bike there, and then if you leave at 6pm, you could take commuter rail with your bike (although they don't allow bikes during rush hour, which is inbound mornings and outbound evenings). It might not be much more expensive than keeping a car from the time you get here to the time you're done with your Wellesley rotation. Zipcar has an overnight rate, which is cheaper than a round trip in a taxi. Just a thought.

NestEggChick (formerly PFgal)

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #11 on: April 20, 2012, 03:20:45 PM »
If you buy student furniture, or even non-student furniture, from Craigslist, be very careful to check for bedbugs, roaches, or other critter issues.  Once those enter your home, they're hard to get rid of.

If you do buy used furniture, Zipcar is a great way to pick it up.  You can rent a hatchback, a minivan, etc. to move whatever you buy. 

If you don't know about Zipcar, check it out.  Living in Boston without a car is fantastic 98% of the time, and for the other 2% there's Zipcar and also car sharing programs that make it very easy and affordable to live here without the hassle of a car.

By the way, if you haven't found a place to live yet, keep in mind that even if you don't have a car, getting a place with a parking spot in Brookline (which doesn't allow overnight parking on the streets) is great for when you have guests.

Bartleby

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #12 on: April 26, 2012, 05:28:25 AM »
Interesting, I didn't know you could bring a bike onto the T.  Biking out and taking the T back could be possible if they have shower facilities in the locker room at the hospital.  As long as it doesn't snow.

Zipcar is something I gave consideration to, and it sounds nice.  I would have to rent it all day if I used it for the commute though which is usually $80-something dollars, so as long as I could keep it under maybe two trips a month it could save some money.  The car I would be bringing with me was bought in cash for $3,000 and is pretty reliable, so it can probably give zipcar a run for its money in terms of costs to operate even with infrequent use.

The bedbug/other pests issue is a bit of a concern buying a used mattress.  It would be a nightmare to introduce something like that into the apartment building, although I think when I checked up on this that Boston does not have a bedbug problem.  There is probably some way to clean it out and avoid transferring pests though I would hope, maybe take it outside and wipe it down before bringing it in?

moneymohawk

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #13 on: April 26, 2012, 06:52:05 AM »
Some thoughts from someone who also moved to Boston and has lived here for six years...

1.) Driving will be stressful at first, but you will adjust in a few months. The driving culture can seem aggressive (and probably is, in truth), but another way to describe it might be "worry about where you need to get to, and expect others to do what they need to do as well."  Sort of a "zealous advocacy" thing, if that makes sense?  Still, moving here is an adjustment.

2.) Even after you adjust, driving will still sometimes be stressful, mostly because of the demented street layout (no one's fault, just an historical artifact). Buy a used GPS. Seriously.

3.) Oh, and traffic can be pretty bad too, like any city.

4.) You're totally right about zipcar--too expensive to use for commuting.

5.) While you can bring a bike on the T, they won't let you during rush hour unless it's a folder.  Many buses do have bike racks, though, and there are no restrictions there!

6.) The best value in mailing is books (and other media like CDs, DVDs, etc). The post office gives a great rate despite how heavy they are!  That said, if you're going to rent a big vehicle, there's probably no point.

There seems to be a pretty large group of mustachians here, judging by the meetup forum.  So maybe we'll see you at a meetup after you're settled.

Hope that helps!  Good luck on your move!

velocistar237

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2012, 08:45:30 AM »
5.) While you can bring a bike on the T, they won't let you during rush hour unless it's a folder.  Many buses do have bike racks, though, and there are no restrictions there!

I've tried a folding bike, and the geometry was unpleasant. Only go that route if you are biking short distances, like between public transit and home or work. If it's a really short distance, a Xootr kick scooter might make more sense.

I used a bus bike rack for the first time last week, heading to a Sox game, and it was easy. I rarely see them used, probably because it makes more sense to just ride the bike! I was with a friend at the time, and the bike was for the ride home.

It sounds like keeping the car until you don't need it anymore is your best option.

although I think when I checked up on this that Boston does not have a bedbug problem.

Boston has kept bedbugs at bay by doing as much as possible to prevent hand-offs of bedding and upholstered furniture. There are infestations, especially in areas with high student populations, but the city is very aggressive about fighting them.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/02/us/02boston.html?_r=1

shedinator

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #15 on: April 27, 2012, 07:06:46 AM »
Hey all, thanks for the great replies!  To further clarify I will be near the Longwood medical area, technically in Brookline but within a ~10 min walk of BWH and BIDMC. I had planned to go car-free but I was assigned to four months of community rotations in Wellesley over the course of the next year and with the hours I will work public transportation is apparently inadequate (it seems Sundays and holidays pose the biggest problems, so I would have to get cabs at times).

Will you be working primarily in the Longwood area? I hope so, because I can't fathom why anybody would move to Brookline in order to work in Wellesley. They're both incredibly overpriced areas of the GBA, but IMO Brookline is much worse (they keep the meters running until 8 PM!), and Wellesley's far enough West that you could find lower rents if you were willing to live on the other side.

Regarding public transportation; I used to ride the D-line to class twice a week from Newton to Fenway (walked to BU from Fenway). between the time I got on and the time we hit Brookline Village, the train was crammed up like a can of sardines. Once we pulled out of Longwood, it was practically empty. By that casual observation, I have to assume that many, many people have found public transport to be perfectly adequate for working in medicine. If anyone in particular has told you that the T is not a viable option, it is because that person is a complainypants trying to justify his/her own car addiction. Sundays and Holidays? The first train runs about a half hour later on Sunday mornings, and federal holidays follow the Sunday schedule. Other than that, there's really no difference, except that the last train is held for the end of festivities on July 4. I guess if you need to be at work before 5:30 AM (your post says you'd be biking "close to 5 AM," so that may be the case), and will need to stay until after midnight, then public transport is impractical. Otherwise, by the time you navigate your vehicle through about half of your morning commute, you'll have the uncontrollable urge to slap every other driver around you, and you'll have the unfortunate realization that while you've been sitting in traffic, at least two D-trains have made the trip from Longwood to Wellesley already. And then on those rare days where you actually beat the train to work, you'll see some 50% of your co-workers showing up late, completely excused for their tardiness because it was the fault of the MBTA. Unless your job starts before 530, I would seriously reconsider that public transportation thing.

As for bikes... only foldable bikes are allowed on the Green line, and they must be fully folded before you enter the gates/trains. Most other lines disallow unfolded bikes during rush hour, which is defined differently for the different lines.

Enphuego

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #16 on: April 27, 2012, 02:54:13 PM »
Basically, the things I want to move are: computer and electronic equipment, desk, bed, dresser, futon, chairs (desk and small reclining chair), kitchen appliances (microwave, blender, rice cooker, slow cooker, toaster oven, toaster), camping equipment, road bike (value ~$750 new), and a few other miscellaneous items.  I am sure I could fit the computer/electronics, the road bike, and maybe a few personal items in a car, which would leave me with a lot to buy all over again (mostly furniture).

Personally I'd list everything (even the stuff you need) on craigslist for it's replacement cost.  It's way easier to move cash in your pocket across the country. With an RSS feed on craigslist + a few estate sales you'll probably be able to replace everything with better quality items and have money left over.  I certainly wouldn't pay $680 to move college quality furniture across the country.  Once you've pared down your possessions a bit, I'd see what doesn't fit in the car and then either ship it or sell it cheaply, whichever is more cost effective.

I'd also wait on buying a car until you know that you need one.  What one person terms inadequate transportation might work just fine for you.  Most people aren't willing to walk more than 3 blocks or ride a bike, you might find it suitable.  There might also be a coworker you can commute with.  Even a small car costs $6,000 a year.  If you end up needing one desperately you could always rent a vehicle immediately and spend the next week finding a deal on a used car.

NestEggChick (formerly PFgal)

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2012, 08:50:29 PM »
There's been talk of bringing a bike on the train, but would you need to?  Do you need it at both ends?  If you'd only need it at home, and your job is near the train, then you could just leave your bike locked to a bike stand.  Of course, this assumes that it's a safe enough area.  Still, that might help things.

And I agree with an earlier poster: if you're going to drive here, get a GPS!  Mine has more than paid for itself just in the gas savings from no longer driving around in circles.  I love Boston, but I have to admit that the streets make no sense.

velocistar237

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #18 on: April 28, 2012, 06:33:39 AM »
There's been talk of bringing a bike on the train, but would you need to?  Do you need it at both ends?

Beater bikes are cheap, and you can keep one locked up at each end of your train ride.

Bartleby

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #19 on: April 28, 2012, 04:46:14 PM »
Will you be working primarily in the Longwood area? I hope so, because I can't fathom why anybody would move to Brookline in order to work in Wellesley.

Yeah, to clarify I will work in Beth Israel and Brigham & Women's (~10 min walk) or nearby places almost all of the time, but I have to do some community internal medicine rotations in Wellesley.  So for two separate two month blocks I will be in Wellesley.  When does the T start to run on Sundays, 5-5:30?  It's tough to know start times in medicine because it is basically whenever the doctor in charge says it is!  If he/she wants to round at seven you will probably have to be there at five to review all the overnight events, examine all of your patients, and prepare notes and a presentation for the team on the patient's progress.  I try my best to shoot for efficiency, but that is limited by the need to do the job right--- I wouldn't cut any corners that I would not be comfortable with someone cutting in the care of my own family member.  So I might have to be in crazy early some days.

When I can take the T I can easily walk to and from the stops.  One is five minutes from my future studio and the other is right by the hospital I would work in, so no need for biking to and from the T.  The only time I would want to bring a bike on the T is if I biked the whole commute in the early morning and then wanted to take the T back when it runs in the afternoon.  And even if I have the car I plan to use the T every day I can, it sounds a lot better than driving to me too.

And I will keep an eye out for Boston meetups, I expect there are a lot of interesting MMM readers up there!

Erik Y

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #20 on: May 01, 2012, 12:08:54 PM »
When I moved from VA to CA in '91 I sold or gave away most of my posessions.  I then packed up about 8-10 boxes and shipped them to my new address (my roommates were already in the house).  The boxes had mostly clothes, but I think half of them contained my stereo and album collection.  Everything I didn't ship (not much), I packed on my motorcycle and it rode across the country with me.  I bought a new futon when I got to Long Beach and life was set.  With Craigslist today it seems that selling stuff in VA and then buying replacements in MA would be the way to go.  You can probably pack quite a lot of things in your car and could strap some to the roof as well. 

Congratulations and good luck on your new adventure.

Erik

jpo

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #21 on: May 08, 2012, 02:53:05 PM »
I used PODS when moving from Ohio to North Carolina. Was more expensive than Uhaul but was also much more flexible. Half the price of professional mover estimates. I would recommend it to anyone who's moving farther than a few hours away.

shedinator

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #22 on: May 08, 2012, 11:45:39 PM »
Yeah, to clarify I will work in Beth Israel and Brigham & Women's (~10 min walk) or nearby places almost all of the time, but I have to do some community internal medicine rotations in Wellesley.  So for two separate two month blocks I will be in Wellesley.  When does the T start to run on Sundays, 5-5:30?  It's tough to know start times in medicine because it is basically whenever the doctor in charge says it is! 

That makes more sense. All good hospitals, btw. You're going to be working with some great people.

I would find out from your fellow workers what the "norm" is when it comes to starting times. There are enough people in scrubs on the D Line with name badges that read "Dr ______," that I'm guessing you'll be able to use public transport pretty frequently. There are also several interns @ the Longwood plaza who stop into my coffee shop on a regular basis, and I'm pretty sure they're T-riders. If it's just the 4 months, and after that you won't be rotating out, I'd consider selling the car at that point. The only reason we kept the car is that we live in Newton, and that means affordable grocery stores are driving distance (unless I want to make daily trips, or try to carry a whole week's worth of groceries on the train while keeping track of a 3-year-old).
@PFGal and Velocistar- Not sure if it's the case for every T stop, but I know of several people who have had their bikes impounded for leaving them at the station overnight, and others such as myself who've had theirs stolen, even with bike locks attached. I'd prefer to take the bike on the train for that reason, YMMV.

As for moving (and sorry I didn't respond to that initially), I agree with EnPhuego about liquidating and replacing as much as possible. I'm currently discussing with my wife what things we can turn to cash here and turn back into things when we get to the other end. It looks like we might even be able to sell a few things at below market rates here, and pick up replacements for even less when we move, which might be a nice way to lower our cost of moving even further.

Bartleby

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #23 on: June 17, 2012, 07:17:48 AM »
I always like when people follow up with updates on questions like these, so here is mine:

I ended up driving up to Boston, assisted by my mom with a second carload.  That left gas costs somewhere in the neighborhood of $75 for my car and $150 for hers (round trip). I also bought an airbed (mostly so she could stay and see Boston for a week) for $100 since I do not have a real bed anymore.  I was able to disassemble most of my furniture, including my desk and a Malm drawer set, and place the boards behind the front seats of each car allowing for easy, secure transport.

The only things I lost by doing it this way v getting a UHaul were a large chest of drawers and an ikea queen sized bed.  The large chest of drawers I didn't really need anyway, and the bed I will either do without or look for a less expensive replacement.  The cost savings outweighed these losses, I think: I did not have to get a UHaul, I did not have to get movers to help me on the Boston end (where I don't know anyone to help yet), and I did not have to make a trip back to VA afterwards to pick up my car!  Considering the only nice thing I lost was a bed that's a pretty solid deal.

A major benefit to doing things this way was that it really freed me up to ruthlessly donate the things I didn't really need.  I wasn't sure how much would fit into two cars, so if I wasn't going to definitely use it in Boston I donated it to friends or charity (or if it was real junk, just threw it away).  This was just the push I needed to get rid of all the stuff I was on the fence about getting rid of before.  It's great having only two partially-full carloads worth of stuff now that I am here living in a studio! 

There are some caveats to this method, though.  First, as a single guy it was possible for me to pack things up into two cars.  This probably isn't the case for someone with a family.  Second, disassembling and reassembling all of my furniture to pack into a car took time.  I didn't mind because I had the downtime and I enjoy work like that, but if you make a large amount of money per hour it would probably make more financial sense to rent a uhaul and toss everything in assembled rather than taking a couple extra days off to play with your furniture.  You would just have to do the math.

So basically as a student, this moving method worked great!  It cost ~$225 in gas, and I was able to take everything I wanted except for my bed.  As a bonus, my mom got to hang out with me for the week in Boston to see some sights and go on a whale watching trip, which I think she really enjoyed (despite the day of driving on both ends).  Highly recommended!  Thanks again to everybody above, I think that bouncing ideas off of you all probably saved me at least $700 in this move and left me with a less cluttered studio for the year!

James

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Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #24 on: June 17, 2012, 08:15:49 AM »
A major benefit to doing things this way was that it really freed me up to ruthlessly donate the things I didn't really need.


Thanks much for the follow up, I like them also.  Glad you were able to make it work, I'm impressed.


I don't think many people appreciate the idea of how much stress "things" add to our lives.  Having to thin belongings from time to time is a good thing, something I wish I learned earlier on.


Also, I think people underestimate the benefit of the "can do" attitude this shows.  Just the very process of "making it work" has given you a psychological edge in life.  You took the road less traveled, and that creates bonus willpower and experience for future use.

moneymohawk

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
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  • Location: Boston
Re: Mustachian moving: Virginia to Boston
« Reply #25 on: June 18, 2012, 08:43:19 PM »
Welcome to Boston!

You should come get to know everybody at the next meetup.  There's a healthy little group of mustachians up here.