Author Topic: Tent to a trailer  (Read 1469 times)

The Fake Cheap

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Tent to a trailer
« on: August 05, 2020, 07:20:12 PM »
Our family really loves camping, especially our son (7).  He isn't really into anything such as sports, so camping/summer time are a big deal for him.

So we are really considering buying a trailer, specifically a hard sided pop up trailer.  We would like to upgrade from tent camping for numerous reasons. Here are a few:
 The amount of prep it takes for tent camping is huge, the main reason for this is DW likes to bring EVERYTHING. 
Tent camping is tiresome, the setup, the sleeping, crawling in and out of the tent, it's getting harder we are in our mid 40's now (please note we are not lazy and are physically active)
The weather, if it rains while packing up, the tent needs to be set up again to dry off once we are home, this is a pain.
 The process of trying to locate stuff (toothbrushes, toys, maps) while the car is jam packed with stuff is incredibly frustrating.

The pluses of the camper would be an easier time prepping for camping trips and better organization. 
The ability to camp in all forms of weather, and related to this, the ability to camp off season with the heater (less people to deal with), this is probably the biggest plus for me.

It seems like we can get a decent trailer for about 8K, according to what I have seen listed, (it seems like prices have crept up here due to everyone wanting to buy one).  I don't want to pretend that this is a cheap/frugal option, however I am interested in hearing from anyone else who may have switched from a tent to a small trailer for family camping.

Dicey

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2020, 08:02:33 PM »
Here's an earlier thread on this topic:
https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/ask-a-mustachian/campers-are-they-anti-mustachian/

In a response to a question I asked the forum hive mind about RV bed toppers, Just Joe recommended this site, which you might also find useful.
https://www.thepopupprincess.com/

My parents were not well-to-do, but when my mom went back to work when the youngest went to school, there was more money than before. They bought a used tent trailer. Most of us kids still had to sleep in a tent, but the tent trailer made cooking easier and it gave us a way to pack our stuff so that it didn't have to go in the car, so our overall level of comfort rose. My parents loved it. We wore out the first one and they eventually upgraded to a slightly larger hardtop, which they enjoyed until it wore out. It also came in handy when it was parked in the back yard. The kids got put in the tent trailer (which was an upgrade from their usual tent status) and guests got to sleep in the temporarily vacated kid's room in a real bed. Worked out great.

Years later, when my sister and her family bought a wreck of a houses to renovate, they bought a used tent trailer and lived in that while they fixed up the house. She said she had so many happy memories of the tent trailer(s) we had as kids, it was an easy decision, even if they seldom took it anywhere.

LovinPSDs

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2020, 07:31:55 AM »
Fake Cheap - I'll ask the same as I did on the other post.

What type of vehicle/Tow Vehicle do you have?  My parents have on the of the Hardside A frame pop ups, and it's AWESOME.  Now it's small... Much smaller than a pop up trailer, but for a family of 3 it would totally work, especially if you tent campers.  They are hardside so weather is a non issue, counter height fridge, some can have a bathroom, (2) beds...The great part is they break down to 4ft tall so they are SUPER easy to tow. There is a good amount of storage and if you had one of the popup screen rooms to keep you out of the sun (you can attach an awning to the A frame) I think you'd be in a good

My folks have the A212HW and i'm a big fan.

https://forestriverinc.com/rvs/camping-trailers/rockwood-hard-side-pop-up-campers

Of course there are other brands as well

The Fake Cheap

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2020, 08:16:13 AM »
Here's an earlier thread on this topic:
https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/ask-a-mustachian/campers-are-they-anti-mustachian/

In a response to a question I asked the forum hive mind about RV bed toppers, Just Joe recommended this site, which you might also find useful.
https://www.thepopupprincess.com/

My parents were not well-to-do, but when my mom went back to work when the youngest went to school, there was more money than before. They bought a used tent trailer. Most of us kids still had to sleep in a tent, but the tent trailer made cooking easier and it gave us a way to pack our stuff so that it didn't have to go in the car, so our overall level of comfort rose. My parents loved it. We wore out the first one and they eventually upgraded to a slightly larger hardtop, which they enjoyed until it wore out. It also came in handy when it was parked in the back yard. The kids got put in the tent trailer (which was an upgrade from their usual tent status) and guests got to sleep in the temporarily vacated kid's room in a real bed. Worked out great.

Years later, when my sister and her family bought a wreck of a houses to renovate, they bought a used tent trailer and lived in that while they fixed up the house. She said she had so many happy memories of the tent trailer(s) we had as kids, it was an easy decision, even if they seldom took it anywhere.

Thanks for the link I'll check that site out. 

I think that is a big part of it for us too, the experience/memories for our child, we have 2-3 trips of tent camping the last 3 or 4 summers, and we figure we will go more often with a camper. 

The Fake Cheap

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2020, 08:19:57 AM »
Fake Cheap - I'll ask the same as I did on the other post.

What type of vehicle/Tow Vehicle do you have?  My parents have on the of the Hardside A frame pop ups, and it's AWESOME.  Now it's small... Much smaller than a pop up trailer, but for a family of 3 it would totally work, especially if you tent campers.  They are hardside so weather is a non issue, counter height fridge, some can have a bathroom, (2) beds...The great part is they break down to 4ft tall so they are SUPER easy to tow. There is a good amount of storage and if you had one of the popup screen rooms to keep you out of the sun (you can attach an awning to the A frame) I think you'd be in a good

My folks have the A212HW and i'm a big fan.

https://forestriverinc.com/rvs/camping-trailers/rockwood-hard-side-pop-up-campers


Of course there are other brands as well

Thanks for the link, I'll have a look.

The vehicle, that is a whole other discussion.  Currently we do not have a vehicle that can two anything other than a small tent trailer, which we are not interested in doing.  So there would be a used vehicle purchase...I feel like that needs to be separate from this discussion. 


I have to admit the towin aspect I'm not really looking forward to, which is another reason the hard sided pop up seems to be the way to go for us.  We do actually have a pop up screen room already.
« Last Edit: August 06, 2020, 08:21:53 AM by The Fake Cheap »

ontheway2

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2020, 08:28:02 AM »
I've been looking at the Rustic Teardrop campers. I want something that can be towed with a 2k limit vehicle, but I also want hardside as one of my issues with tents is rain. I do not want to deal with fabric. I also have concerns about wildlife and know some place require or strongly recommend hardsided campers. I don't have one though to be able to recommend it or talk about the transition

LovinPSDs

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2020, 08:38:12 AM »
Fake Cheap - I'll ask the same as I did on the other post.

What type of vehicle/Tow Vehicle do you have?  My parents have on the of the Hardside A frame pop ups, and it's AWESOME.  Now it's small... Much smaller than a pop up trailer, but for a family of 3 it would totally work, especially if you tent campers.  They are hardside so weather is a non issue, counter height fridge, some can have a bathroom, (2) beds...The great part is they break down to 4ft tall so they are SUPER easy to tow. There is a good amount of storage and if you had one of the popup screen rooms to keep you out of the sun (you can attach an awning to the A frame) I think you'd be in a good

My folks have the A212HW and i'm a big fan.

https://forestriverinc.com/rvs/camping-trailers/rockwood-hard-side-pop-up-campers


Of course there are other brands as well

Thanks for the link, I'll have a look.

The vehicle, that is a whole other discussion.  Currently we do not have a vehicle that can two anything other than a small tent trailer, which we are not interested in doing.  So there would be a used vehicle purchase...I feel like that needs to be separate from this discussion. 


I have to admit the towin aspect I'm not really looking forward to, which is another reason the hard sided pop up seems to be the way to go for us.  We do actually have a pop up screen room already.

The good news about these A Frames is they are low profile and easily towable.  A small SUV would be able to handle them just fine.. .My mom considered pulling hers with their Outback but my dad also has an F350 for his business so they just go big haha.

401Killer

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2020, 09:30:06 AM »
I can't recommend enough the hard side pop up campers. I had a Rockwood A122BH and it's the way to go. At least while the kid is young, they will have to sleep on the table/bed setup(big bed still). Unless they wanted to still sleep in a tent!

They have the lowest towing resistance and only dropped the MPG by a few in a Jeep Grand Cherokee. I could set it up in about 2 minutes(no really). It had 2 types of heat, AC, refrigerator(Propane, 12V or 120v), microwave(removed it for extra space), hot water heater, outdoor shower... I loved it.

My car camping tent is now a Gazelle T4 Pop-Up Portable Camping Hub Tent from Amazon. This thing sets up also in about 2 minutes and it's badass.




Just Joe

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2020, 10:55:50 AM »
With the teardrop campers - consider what you will do if you are caught far from home with a rainy 1-2 day period.

A teardrop works great for one or two people. Relax on the bed until the rain stops. Kids change the calculus a little.

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2020, 11:26:46 AM »
Hey OP!  You might read through this recent similar thread.  The OP there came to the conclusion that they would combine some tent camping with renting remote cabins for less commitment, less expense and maximum fun.  (Then a whole lot of people kept posting after the OP came to a conclusion, I haven’t read everything after that...) Your family of course has its own needs and preferences, but you might find the conversation useful.

https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/ask-a-mustachian/how-to-have-family-adventures-without-a-truck-and-trailer/

For us, we’re late 30s, no kids (I’m sure kids change the scenario).  We have been camping 4 out of the past 5 weekends. What is making it doable is reducing the variables and keeping things packed as much as possible. For food, we’ve just lowered our expectations.  We got a little stove that quickly boils water and an assortment of backpacking food, and “regular” grocery store quick cooking food.  We often have sausages, s’mores over a fire, cooked on a roasting stick the first evening, and after that we’ll have quick cooking food with fresh veggies and fruit.  This means almost no need for a cooler/ice/all-that-planning. No hauling lots of cooking gear. No greasy mess.  No standing over a fire. And you always have quick coffee/tea/got chocolate.  For me it has eliminated the weight of that planning and shopping (especially with COVID) and allowed us a lot more enjoyment.

The Fake Cheap

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2020, 12:40:35 PM »
With the teardrop campers - consider what you will do if you are caught far from home with a rainy 1-2 day period.

A teardrop works great for one or two people. Relax on the bed until the rain stops. Kids change the calculus a little.

Typically what we would with rain is drive to an indoor type of entertainment, or most campgrounds have a shelter or two that will usually keep the little one busy while the weather clears.  If we were planning on a weekend of camping and saw nothing but rain in the forecast, we would normally cancel the trip and go on a better weekend.  In a worst case scenario if we were stuck somewhere we have a portable DVD player to put some movies on.  At least with a trailer you could have a dry place to go back to and a heater to dry and warm yourself up with if it is on the colder side.  Going back into a tent with your damp clothes and wet jackets is not fun.

The Fake Cheap

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #11 on: August 06, 2020, 12:42:38 PM »
Fake Cheap - I'll ask the same as I did on the other post.

What type of vehicle/Tow Vehicle do you have?  My parents have on the of the Hardside A frame pop ups, and it's AWESOME.  Now it's small... Much smaller than a pop up trailer, but for a family of 3 it would totally work, especially if you tent campers.  They are hardside so weather is a non issue, counter height fridge, some can have a bathroom, (2) beds...The great part is they break down to 4ft tall so they are SUPER easy to tow. There is a good amount of storage and if you had one of the popup screen rooms to keep you out of the sun (you can attach an awning to the A frame) I think you'd be in a good

My folks have the A212HW and i'm a big fan.

https://forestriverinc.com/rvs/camping-trailers/rockwood-hard-side-pop-up-campers


Of course there are other brands as well

Thanks for the link, I'll have a look.

The vehicle, that is a whole other discussion.  Currently we do not have a vehicle that can two anything other than a small tent trailer, which we are not interested in doing.  So there would be a used vehicle purchase...I feel like that needs to be separate from this discussion. 


I have to admit the towin aspect I'm not really looking forward to, which is another reason the hard sided pop up seems to be the way to go for us.  We do actually have a pop up screen room already.

The good news about these A Frames is they are low profile and easily towable.  A small SUV would be able to handle them just fine.. .My mom considered pulling hers with their Outback but my dad also has an F350 for his business so they just go big haha.

The Outback (used) is one of the vehicles I was considering if we do go ahead, but I would rather save the vehicle discussion for another thread. :)

The Fake Cheap

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #12 on: August 06, 2020, 12:48:31 PM »
I can't recommend enough the hard side pop up campers. I had a Rockwood A122BH and it's the way to go. At least while the kid is young, they will have to sleep on the table/bed setup(big bed still). Unless they wanted to still sleep in a tent!

They have the lowest towing resistance and only dropped the MPG by a few in a Jeep Grand Cherokee. I could set it up in about 2 minutes(no really). It had 2 types of heat, AC, refrigerator(Propane, 12V or 120v), microwave(removed it for extra space), hot water heater, outdoor shower... I loved it.

My car camping tent is now a Gazelle T4 Pop-Up Portable Camping Hub Tent from Amazon. This thing sets up also in about 2 minutes and it's badass.

This is what we are thinking too, with our son being 7 currently, we (hope) we have at least 3 or 4 more years where he doesn't mind hanging out with Mom & Dad on camping trips, so now is the time.

Thanks for the tip on the Cherokee, I haven't really considered those as a possible towing vehicle. 

Did yours have any type of toilet in it?  It seems like the hard sided pop up with 2 beds and a toilet are hard to find.  I know adding a cassette tolet is an option, but it sounds messy and awkward..where would you put it?  I don't think the microwave would be of that much use either, I've never had one in the last 20 years of camping, so I don't think it is necessary.

The Fake Cheap

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #13 on: August 06, 2020, 12:55:46 PM »
Hey OP!  You might read through this recent similar thread.  The OP there came to the conclusion that they would combine some tent camping with renting remote cabins for less commitment, less expense and maximum fun.  (Then a whole lot of people kept posting after the OP came to a conclusion, I haven’t read everything after that...) Your family of course has its own needs and preferences, but you might find the conversation useful.

https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/ask-a-mustachian/how-to-have-family-adventures-without-a-truck-and-trailer/

For us, we’re late 30s, no kids (I’m sure kids change the scenario).  We have been camping 4 out of the past 5 weekends. What is making it doable is reducing the variables and keeping things packed as much as possible. For food, we’ve just lowered our expectations.  We got a little stove that quickly boils water and an assortment of backpacking food, and “regular” grocery store quick cooking food.  We often have sausages, s’mores over a fire, cooked on a roasting stick the first evening, and after that we’ll have quick cooking food with fresh veggies and fruit.  This means almost no need for a cooler/ice/all-that-planning. No hauling lots of cooking gear. No greasy mess.  No standing over a fire. And you always have quick coffee/tea/got chocolate.  For me it has eliminated the weight of that planning and shopping (especially with COVID) and allowed us a lot more enjoyment.

I have read that thread with great interest, it seems like me and that OP are in a similar spot.  I just like the mobility of being able to go where we want to go with a trailer, booking a cabin for a few nights is ok, it is cheaper no question, but it is something to consider.

We do have a propane camping stove which I love, making eggs and coffee when camping it's the best!  We do tend to keep our meals fairly simple when camping, but yes we do bring a large cooler with us. 

ontheway2

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #14 on: August 06, 2020, 01:00:58 PM »
With the teardrop campers - consider what you will do if you are caught far from home with a rainy 1-2 day period.

A teardrop works great for one or two people. Relax on the bed until the rain stops. Kids change the calculus a little.

Not the OP but since I mentioned teardrops, the campers from Rustic I'm looking at have a dinette and room for a tv. They are smaller than the Rockwoods (half the length) but much easier to pull because of it and able to be pulled by a 1500-2k limit vehicle. If there was multiple days of rain expected, I wouldn't go camping

https://www.rustictrailteardrops.com/kodiak-stealth/

https://www.rustictrailteardrops.com/papa-bear/

The Fake Cheap

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #15 on: August 06, 2020, 01:04:02 PM »
I've been looking at the Rustic Teardrop campers. I want something that can be towed with a 2k limit vehicle, but I also want hardside as one of my issues with tents is rain. I do not want to deal with fabric. I also have concerns about wildlife and know some place require or strongly recommend hardsided campers. I don't have one though to be able to recommend it or talk about the transition

Animals are a bit of a concern for me as well.  Each night we carefully pack up anything food related back into the car, which is a pain.  We were lucky last year, we accidentally left something, a bag of chips I think, in our screen tent and an animal (racoon I'm guessing) was able to get in without tearing the thing to shreds.  I would also rather be in something hard sided in case a bear wonders onto our site. Although bears are not really an issue around here, but they are present. 

The Fake Cheap

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #16 on: August 06, 2020, 01:11:47 PM »
With the teardrop campers - consider what you will do if you are caught far from home with a rainy 1-2 day period.

A teardrop works great for one or two people. Relax on the bed until the rain stops. Kids change the calculus a little.

Not the OP but since I mentioned teardrops, the campers from Rustic I'm looking at have a dinette and room for a tv. They are smaller than the Rockwoods (half the length) but much easier to pull because of it and able to be pulled by a 1500-2k limit vehicle. If there was multiple days of rain expected, I wouldn't go camping

https://www.rustictrailteardrops.com/kodiak-stealth/

https://www.rustictrailteardrops.com/papa-bear/

Those look really cool, would be great for 2, but it seems like they don't make one with a second bed.  Also missing a heater, which probably wouldn't be that hard to add.  The price is right too!

ontheway2

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #17 on: August 06, 2020, 02:06:57 PM »
With the teardrop campers - consider what you will do if you are caught far from home with a rainy 1-2 day period.

A teardrop works great for one or two people. Relax on the bed until the rain stops. Kids change the calculus a little.

Not the OP but since I mentioned teardrops, the campers from Rustic I'm looking at have a dinette and room for a tv. They are smaller than the Rockwoods (half the length) but much easier to pull because of it and able to be pulled by a 1500-2k limit vehicle. If there was multiple days of rain expected, I wouldn't go camping

https://www.rustictrailteardrops.com/kodiak-stealth/

https://www.rustictrailteardrops.com/papa-bear/

Those look really cool, would be great for 2, but it seems like they don't make one with a second bed.  Also missing a heater, which probably wouldn't be that hard to add.  The price is right too!

They are hand built and semi-customizable. It's a small company that just passed 500 camper built. There's actually a lady that bought one to use as a food/coffee truck completely customized. I'm in the south and planned to just bring a small space heater, but a second bed is definitely a consideration. I know they've done a toddler bunk in one before, but I'm not sure if they could put a 5 ft fold down bed in the front or something or not
« Last Edit: August 06, 2020, 02:15:06 PM by ontheway2 »

401Killer

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #18 on: August 07, 2020, 03:38:27 AM »
I can't recommend enough the hard side pop up campers. I had a Rockwood A122BH and it's the way to go. At least while the kid is young, they will have to sleep on the table/bed setup(big bed still). Unless they wanted to still sleep in a tent!

They have the lowest towing resistance and only dropped the MPG by a few in a Jeep Grand Cherokee. I could set it up in about 2 minutes(no really). It had 2 types of heat, AC, refrigerator(Propane, 12V or 120v), microwave(removed it for extra space), hot water heater, outdoor shower... I loved it.

My car camping tent is now a Gazelle T4 Pop-Up Portable Camping Hub Tent from Amazon. This thing sets up also in about 2 minutes and it's badass.

This is what we are thinking too, with our son being 7 currently, we (hope) we have at least 3 or 4 more years where he doesn't mind hanging out with Mom & Dad on camping trips, so now is the time.

Thanks for the tip on the Cherokee, I haven't really considered those as a possible towing vehicle. 

Did yours have any type of toilet in it?  It seems like the hard sided pop up with 2 beds and a toilet are hard to find.  I know adding a cassette tolet is an option, but it sounds messy and awkward..where would you put it?  I don't think the microwave would be of that much use either, I've never had one in the last 20 years of camping, so I don't think it is necessary.

You definitely don't need something as big as a Jeep GC to pull a camper like that. It came with a Cassette toilet. I never found having a bathroom inside the camper really that important personally. Every camp site has facilities and when it's dark guys can go anywhere! But for a family and their comfort it's really just a personal option. The shower option is kind of a big deal for me though. To be able to take one whenever I wanted was nice. It was an outside shower, so I bought a free standing wall setup and made a nice little enclosed room on the side of the camper. I changed the water nozzle to a low flow 0.5gph head and with the 6gal water heater you could stand there forever.

My setup whether it was with one of my small campers or tents were VERY minimal. I would setup my camper and have chairs out and sitting in 10 minutes of pulling up. I LOVED watching families and couples with their crazy massive tents, full kitchen tables and hanging kitchen utensil racks, camp brand this, camp brand that, 7 totes that they would rifle through and pull nothing they needed out of em... They would cook breakfast and the amount of dishes, trash and crap they would dirty and consume was astonishing.

I'm a ninja with it comes to buying stuff like this, esp off Craigslist. I bought that Rockwood A122BH on craigslist from a young couple who had it for 1 month and used it once. I got it for $9500, I think they paid over $14k for it! I owned it 2 years and sold it for $10,000! My first camper was a Coachman Clipper 17BH. It was brand new stickered at $14,700 at the General RV. I bought it for $10,400! Owned it a few years and sold it for $9000. The markup on campers at dealers(new and used) is out of control.

Dammit... I really need to get out into the woods.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2020, 03:43:59 AM by 401Killer »

Just Joe

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #19 on: August 11, 2020, 07:41:44 AM »
Brought home a late-80s popup over the weekend. 10ft, sleeps eight. Have set it up twice now in the driveway. Takes ten minutes or so.

Weighs 1200 lbs and our V6 SUV pulls it without effort. Stopping is noticeably longer so plan ahead. No brakes on the trailer. Working through things like new tires and missing screws, and whatnot. No glaring issues. Needs a bath and waterproofing. No leaks in weekend rains though I see evidence of leakage at some past in one of the roof corners. Wrinkled wall paper.

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #20 on: August 11, 2020, 07:44:10 AM »
Brought home a late-80s popup over the weekend. 10ft, sleeps eight. Have set it up twice now in the driveway. Takes ten minutes or so.

Weighs 1200 lbs and our V6 SUV pulls it without effort. Stopping is noticeably longer so plan ahead. No brakes on the trailer. Working through things like new tires and missing screws, and whatnot. No glaring issues. Needs a bath and waterproofing. No leaks in weekend rains though I see evidence of leakage at some past in one of the roof corners. Wrinkled wall paper.
Since you're the person who provided the "Pop Up Princess" link, I know you've had plenty of inspiration. Is it too early to register a request for before-and-after pictures?

Just Joe

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #21 on: August 11, 2020, 08:33:48 AM »
Our before/current pictures would be of a bone stock late 1980s popup camper in good condition.

Our after pictures will be of a cleaner late 1980s popup camper with new tires and updated peel stick "luxury vinyl" floor from leftover tiles we have. Original brown linoleum floor is good but very 1975. Surely it must have looked dated when the camper was new? Even cleaned it looks dirty. :)

Will add LED rope lighting around the inside of the roof and under the awning. Reused from cheap salvaged HF solar sidewalk lights powered with a $10 12V converter and a $2 toggle switch. Might even put the inside lights and outside lights on separate toggle switches! ;) Perhaps light the end beds with LEDs on a dimmer for fun. We like ambient lighting that has good coverage but is dim and yellow like a candle at night. Cozy. No disco strobe effects.

The interior of this popup is in really good condition so DW and I think we'll just keep it original for the time being for simplicity. Drapes would be first to be replaced. Should the camper begin to show it's age we'll do something fancier.

Will likely buy a can of paint and brush paint the visible portions of the frame (rear bumper) and trailer tongue where the paint is showing its age. The propane tanks need a little paint too.  Rear bumper needs a little de-bending. ;)

Thought about adding USB ports to charge with but we have a travel battery that will get the job done just as well. 4 device charges per travel battery charge. We mostly carry our phone cameras and a little AM/FM/Shortwave radio.

 

tomorrowsomewherenew

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Re: Tent to a trailer
« Reply #22 on: August 15, 2020, 08:48:20 PM »
We used to tent camp a lot. That got old so we bought a super light weight trailer. Fiberglass trailers are pretty widely available. We ended up buying a Trillium and it weighs about 1200lbs unloaded. We pull it with our Volvo S60 (Camry-sized sedan). We found out that all the Volvos have fantastic towing capacities for their size, and were quite cheap when buying used.