Author Topic: What does your monthly grocery list look like?  (Read 24351 times)

CanuckExpat

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #50 on: August 14, 2014, 04:41:58 PM »
I'm glad to see so many people moving away from this type of thinking - eating meat at every meal is, as a general rule, one of the most environmentally destructive things a person can do, even with the "better" styles of farming.

I like the taste of meat as much as the next person, maybe more; when cooking I find it handy to to think of meat as seasoning or adding extra flavor to a meal, not as the main ingredient. This is a better choice for your wallet, your health, and the planet. It's pretty common in most of the worlds cuisine.

TVP is great (Mr PoP doesn't realize it when I use it to extend ground meat and it's awesome for vegetarian tacos, chili, etc), but definitely do NOT buy from that link.  In the bulk bins at our Whole Foods it's $2.69/lb.  The stuff on that link is about 2.5x more expensive than Whole Foods. 

Edited when I realized it was a 4-pack.  Price wasn't quite as ridiculous as it first seemed, but still way overpriced.

Yes, I buy it bulk from Sprouts much cheaper than that as well. I just included the link because I like Bob's Red Mill brand and didn't know if everyone had regular access to hippy food like bulk TVP :)

Zikoris

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #51 on: August 14, 2014, 07:31:44 PM »
Quote
I like the taste of meat as much as the next person, maybe more; when cooking I find it handy to to think of meat as seasoning or adding extra flavor to a meal, not as the main ingredient. This is a better choice for your wallet, your health, and the planet. It's pretty common in most of the worlds cuisine.

Bad wording on my part I guess - I meant meals planned around meat the way most North Americans do. Slab-style :)

JoyBlogette

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #52 on: August 14, 2014, 07:50:56 PM »
Since, I cant eat dairy, or things high in starch or sugar, elimating meat is quite hard when you cant eat bread or rice.

Breakfast is eggs, and either bacon or sausage, with the occasional corend beef, or as my wife likes to do on saturdays blueberry pancakes (which taste good but dont agree with my body)

You will love this!
Banana Pancakes: 1 banana + 2 eggs.  Mash together until smooth.  Fry them up like pancakes (they will be thin).  So delish they don't even need syrup.

Quantum Warrior

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #53 on: October 05, 2014, 07:20:42 AM »
I'm about to make my first big Costco run today as an aspiring Mustachian. It is just me and my girlfriend, girlfriend is an accountant and I am graduating college in December, hopefully working 5 minutes from home at a cool ad agency. Each week, we require about 42 meals plus snacks, and we are trying to slim down a bit. My WEEKLY grocery expenses are the following:

Breakfast: We each have 1 orange, 1 banana, and a handful of nuts
1 bunch of bananas (about 10): $1.50
10 navel oranges ($0.69 each): $6.90
1-2 lbs raw almonds: $0.85*
1-2 lbs roasted cashews: $1.25*

Lunch + Dinner:
- White rice: every 6 months, we get a big 20 lb bag from the Chinese market, which is like 300+ servings, $18 per bag, at 300 servings per bag, which is about 6 cents a serving, plus 21 servings so about: $1.26 per week
- Meat, usually 3 lbs of pork at the Chinese market, diced and marinated in Chinese BBQ sauce overnight, $2.50 per pound, plus the $3 jar of sauce, good for about 21 meals (lunch + some dinners all 7 days), is about: $10.50 per week
- 2 lb bag of carrots, which I roast with a lot of spices: $2.79
- (substitute for carrots on some weeks) Various peppers (poblano, red bell, green) and onions, which I sautee: $3*
- 4 cans of beans, $0.60 each: $2.40, but I usually buy them on bulk when they're on sale for less than 50 cents each, so an average of $2 per week

Snacks/Miscellaneous stock items:
Snacking fruits/items: $3
Occasional clearance rack steals: $3
Stock items (toiletries, etc): $4

$36, for 42 meals + snacks and living items, less than $1 per meal, not too shabby, but I'd like to improve it. How can I do this?

*I buy these items for super cheap by bagging them in the self-service isles, and instead of writing the number of the actual product (i.e. almonds for $7.99/lb), I write the numbers of dirt cheap products like rolled oats, for $1.25/lb, and do the self-checkout so no cashier can check it. Is this unethical? There's always a huge surplus of the items I take, and a friend who works at this supermarket tells me they end up throwing them out anyway, wasting money, so I feel no shame in taking them at a "discount".

expatartist

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #54 on: October 05, 2014, 07:33:02 AM »
*I buy these items for super cheap by bagging them in the self-service isles, and instead of writing the number of the actual product (i.e. almonds for $7.99/lb), I write the numbers of dirt cheap products like rolled oats, for $1.25/lb, and do the self-checkout so no cashier can check it. Is this unethical? There's always a huge surplus of the items I take, and a friend who works at this supermarket tells me they end up throwing them out anyway, wasting money, so I feel no shame in taking them at a "discount".

Your shopping list is meticulously planned out, congratulations.
However re. the deliberate 'mis-labeling', you are stealing, no question about it.

tracylayton

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #55 on: October 05, 2014, 08:50:16 AM »
Cliff bars are expensive...anything else he might eat? I don't buy organic, so I save money there, but that may be important to you. I bought a 5 pound whole chicken for $0.99/per pound. I will skin it (hate to do!) and slow cook it in the crockpot with carrots and onions. Then I will carve it up and have enough tasty chicken for several meals...chicken tacos, chicken salad, etc. Not very healthy, but I will buy a pound of Eckrich sausage ($2.49) and cook it in the oven. I try to keep the meat portion of the dinner to no more than $5.00 unless we're having steaks.

JeffC

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #56 on: October 05, 2014, 09:05:57 AM »
A few suggestions:

Beef is at a very high price these days.  I've found that for a lot of things that you would use ground beef for, ground pork is actually tastier and is about half the price.  The beef price spike isn't supposed to fix itself for about two more years, so I wouldn't plan on that coming down anytime soon.

Learn to cook the cheap cuts of meat.  Chicken leg quarters are the cheapest cut and they are delicious if you give them enough time in the oven or pot to fall off the bone. Then make stock out of said bones and freeze it for use later.   Pork shoulder is usually about $2-3 a pound where I live and it is very delicious and versatile to use all week if you make carnitas out of it.

As many are saying, cutting down on meat would be a good thing for your pocketbook as well as the environment, and your health.  Clearly you care a lot about healthy food choices and even if you are on a paleo diet, that seems like a lot of meat and not a lot of veggies.  Taking a lunch to work is way easier if there isn't meat that can spoil.  I tend to go vegetarian for breakfast(organic eggs+veggies) and lunch, but I am not by any means a vegetarian. Try bringing a salad or something else vegetarian to work and store a giant Costco jar of mixed nuts there for protein. You would save 50 bucks per month or more right there. Costco carries Dubliner cheese which is made from grass-fed cow milk and is very cheap there considering the quality.  I take a few sticks of that also for protein at work. 

I don't fault you at all for going organic.  I'm the same way.  I started growing my own veggies and wouldn't ever consider dumping a bunch of chemicals on my food, so why was I ok with others doing that to the food I was buying? We all have different opinions on that but I'd rather find my savings elsewhere, usually just figuring out how to use less of the expensive things and more of the cheap things.  Sticking to the "Clean 15" (http://www.pbs.org/wnet/need-to-know/health/the-dirty-dozen-and-clean-15-of-produce/616/)(the things that aren't conventionally grown with lots of chemicals), is a great way to eat a low amount of chemicals and also keep it affordable.

sunnyca

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #57 on: October 05, 2014, 05:21:03 PM »
I don't really have a monthly grocery list, since I tend to buy in bulk and online when things are on sale.

Just a couple of suggestions- I'm not sure where you live, but ethnic supermarkets have produce at ridiculously low prices during their weekly sales. 

Re: meat- for the ground beef, I'm not sure what you're making it with, but can you maybe stretch it out a bit more by adding more veggies/grains/lentils/etc to whatever you're making? 

Instead of salmon, are you open to trying other EFA-rich varieties?  Wild mackerel, for example, is super tasty and less than half the cost at the Korean supermarkets I frequent.  You can get frozen filets or fresh for significantly less.

I'd also check around online for staples and baby food.  Quite often Amazon or Vitacost can be a lot cheaper, especially if you do a subscribe and save.

blub

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #58 on: October 05, 2014, 08:11:58 PM »
1-2 lbs raw almonds: $0.85*
1-2 lbs roasted cashews: $1.25*

*I buy these items for super cheap by bagging them in the self-service isles, and instead of writing the number of the actual product (i.e. almonds for $7.99/lb), I write the numbers of dirt cheap products like rolled oats, for $1.25/lb, and do the self-checkout so no cashier can check it. Is this unethical? There's always a huge surplus of the items I take, and a friend who works at this supermarket tells me they end up throwing them out anyway, wasting money, so I feel no shame in taking them at a "discount".

Was just about to ask where you can get prices like that, and... oh. You are scum.

aschmidt2930

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #59 on: October 05, 2014, 10:08:35 PM »
Woah, that's a ton of meat and dairy!  In the name of balance, health, and cash savings I would recommend going heavier on produce (Carrots, Bananas, sweet potatoes, all very cheap) and getting some of your protein from beans and whole wheat pasta instead. 

skinnyindy

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #60 on: October 06, 2014, 04:06:29 AM »
My suggestion is to eat the cheaper meals more often.  For example the salmon and chicken meals cost more so eat them less often.  However I think you are doing great overall and I think you can cut only so much considering your choices ( which I agree with) AND you are going to have a baby!  We have six in our family and we run up to $1200 at times.  One last thing, does your son like sweet potato?  It might be good to puree and add to veggies.  What about giving him taste tests where you add in more and more fruit until he likes it?  He might like to use a popsicle stick to stir and taste with.  Good luck!

Shropskr

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #61 on: October 06, 2014, 10:29:15 AM »
Clifbars are also often found at Target for under $0.99 each in the multipacks.  My kids eat these on weekends for breakfast so mom can sleep in.  Well worth it to me.

windypig

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #62 on: October 06, 2014, 10:47:03 AM »
*I buy these items for super cheap by bagging them in the self-service isles, and instead of writing the number of the actual product (i.e. almonds for $7.99/lb), I write the numbers of dirt cheap products like rolled oats, for $1.25/lb, and do the self-checkout so no cashier can check it. Is this unethical? There's always a huge surplus of the items I take, and a friend who works at this supermarket tells me they end up throwing them out anyway, wasting money, so I feel no shame in taking them at a "discount".

Theft, plain and simple. You know it and the fact that you offer up a rationalization for it is just your guilty conscious seeking justification. You should stop, if not for ethical reasons, for self-preservation, you will get caught eventually.

MountainGal

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #63 on: October 06, 2014, 03:35:06 PM »
For the second month in a row, next week I will spend $200 instead of the usual $330/mo average.  I stopped buying vitamins (though I used to use BOGO coupons), diet soda, a ton of meat, expensive pistachios, too many different cheeses, etc.  Last month I made my own blue cheese dressing.  This month I'll use up whatever other dressings are lurking in our fridge.  I also slowed wayyyyyyy down on my stockpiling, which is pretty much depleted at this point.

It is just DH and me, and I try and cook low carb.  DH does buy his own lunch items such as jerky, dried veggies and veggie chips.  He buys take out for us on Friday nights, averaging about $100/mo.  He does fill in the blanks during the month by purchasing fresh produce or eggs, etc.

A grocery list sample:

$40 approx in fresh produce
3 types of cheeses
pork OR beef roast
large pack chicken breasts
ground beef
ground turkey
2 packages bacon
package of pepperoni
boneless lamb OR scallops OR shrimp
chorizo
low carb tortillas-2 packages
various canned items such as chicken, tuna, beans, soup, veggies
recipe specific items such as whole green chilies, enchilada sauce, Sriracha, artichokes
condiments and spices as needed-vinegar (also used for cleaning), mustard, etc.
sunflower seeds for snacks
Eggs-30 pack
low carb yogurt-5
butter, cottage cheese, sour cream-if needed
oils-canola and olive
frozen-store brand cauliflower, okra, etc.
HBAs, cleaning products, TP

I save an average of 28% buying sale items, and using e and paper coupons.

And to think I used to spend $550+ for the two of us before the recession.  :(  The money saved is being thrown at my remaining school loan.

Goldielocks

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #64 on: October 07, 2014, 02:54:03 AM »
Since this thread has been refreshed, I thought to add in a couple of new thoughts.

The organic meat is not nearly the killer that the misc. Crackers, packaged items are at $75.

If you shop Safeway, and will continue to buy packaged items, even peanut butter or yogurt, then you need to keep a price book and only buy when on sale.  Safeway is a major high low retailer and cheaper than the others due to loss leaders, but only if you price book and buy on the lowest quarterly or annual prices. Buying apple sauce on most trips means you are overpaying by 30%.

When weekly shopping, have a list in mind of items that are staples and low cost.  Eg 5lb apples and bananas but not other fruit, cabbage rutabaga, sweet potatoes, carrots, etc but not other veggies. Milk but not yogurt, etc.  Think in terms of price per serving or meal.  Meat under xx per lb, etc.  Then give a mental budget for other "treat" items each trip and have all these other items rung up separately.  Pay cash for those to ensure you don't go over your budget.  The first time I had to put something back when at the register was eye opening to a new behavior.

Lastly, I believe Lucerne milk uses no bovine growth hormone in the non organic milk too. Check it out.  Think about why you are buying organic dairy.  There is a quality difference with some of the smaller producers but as organic has become larger, so has the pool of cows a major organic dairy pulls from.  Maybe you actually want single farm milk?




PS.

Potatoes, chick peas and lentils  from dried and oatmeal, polenta, and pasta work for me for my carb fix to reduce pricy fresh veggies and meat.  I need to be careful of rice and bread (yeast) too.


Credaholic

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #65 on: October 12, 2014, 11:55:27 PM »
OP chiming back in here. Everyone's responses here have been so useful (minus the misdemeanor) and have hopefully had a good impact on our bottom line. I haven't been able to track our grocery purchases to the penny like I wanted to this month (our second child was born, so life is hectic) but I'm roughly keeping it to 1 monthly $100 Costco trip and weekly $50 produce/etc. trips which keeps us in line with my budget goal. I realized our freezer is so stocked full that I don't need to buy any meat at all for at least another month. I've also cut our meat serving size down some (for instance one package of ground beef which used to feed us two meals is now feeding us three) and hiding that fact from DH by making more hearty stir fry type meals where he doesn't even notice. I fried 4 small pork chops a few weeks ago with the intent of using two in a meal later that week. DH got to them before I could serve him and took two for himself in one sitting! I ate the other, and then saved the remaining one, chopped it up and made pork fried rice later that week with brown rice and veggies, and it happily served both of us without either of us feeling deprived. Interesting how that works! I could easily argue that our protein intake wasn't out of whack before, and that we are in very good health so must be eating pretty well, but seeing how easy it's been to cut the portions back a little makes me realize again that doing better than most of America isn't saying much, and there's always room to kick ass more, so thanks for the face punches.

I also instituted meatless Monday last week. DH says, "Aren't Mondays already bad enough?!" But he happily ate his delicious home made macaroni and cheese.

I can't remember if I said before, but I rely on frozen veggies a lot - especially when it's not harvesting season! I've read that frozen veggies can be fresher than the fresh veggies you get at the supermarket because they're flash frozen almost immediately upon being picked. Agree or disagree? Also seem very cost effective.

And meal planning is probably saving my sanity right now, not just my budget. We've eaten at home and avoided take out almost entirely since baby was born. I'm going to give myself a little kudos for that one, because preparing meals is not easy with two under two! It helps a ton knowing what I'm making and what needs to be done.

GardenFun

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #66 on: October 13, 2014, 06:55:52 AM »
I've also cut our meat serving size down some (for instance one package of ground beef which used to feed us two meals is now feeding us three) and hiding that fact from DH by making more hearty stir fry type meals where he doesn't even notice. I fried 4 small pork chops a few weeks ago with the intent of using two in a meal later that week. DH got to them before I could serve him and took two for himself in one sitting! I ate the other, and then saved the remaining one, chopped it up and made pork fried rice later that week with brown rice and veggies, and it happily served both of us without either of us feeling deprived. Interesting how that works!


Congratulations on the new baby!  Recently discovered this thread and found the suggestions interesting.  My husband comes from a meat-eating family (one time we had steak dinner at the in-laws where we literally only ate steak).

Here's some ideas that are working for us:

- Nachos/tacos:  Add a can of beans to the ground beef.  Stretches it out without him realizing. 
- Fried Rice:  You already found the benefits of this sneaky trick.
- Shepherd's pie:  Add cubed potatoes or rutabagas in place of some of the meat.
- Enchiladas:  Same as above, replaced some of the meat with shredded/small cube potatoes or beans.
- Beef stroganoff:  Increased the mushroom portion to replace some of the beef.
- Chili:  Added kidney beans to the chili beans, reduced the meat portion. 
- Soups/Stews:  Found that I could cut the amount of meat in 1/3 (cubed) up to 1/2 (ground) without any noticeable change in texture or taste.

Once in a while, he catches on and gets a little grumpy, but then I serve him a classic steak dinner the next night and that makes up for it.  Then I go back to vegetable substitution.  ;-)

rocksinmyhead

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #67 on: October 13, 2014, 07:31:55 AM »
I also instituted meatless Monday last week. DH says, "Aren't Mondays already bad enough?!" But he happily ate his delicious home made macaroni and cheese.

homemade mac and cheese sounds like an AWESOME and positive start to Meatless Mondays, good idea! :)

I've found this thread super helpful too, so I'm glad you started it!

pork chops are a great idea, I got here late but one of the things I was going to mention is that it seemed like you ate a lot of BEEF. pork is way cheaper. pork butt makes awesome pulled pork in the crockpot (to use for tacos, sandwiches, etc.) and it's pretty cheap, definitely one of my faves.

LibrarIan

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #68 on: October 13, 2014, 07:36:37 AM »
Just reading all these posts of people grumbling about smaller meat portions or tricking their SOs into eating less meat (because they'd complain otherwise) is just... sad. Why is meat so important to everyone that somehow a meal isn't a meal without it? I ate meat for 21 years, then quit cold turkey (pardon the bad pun). I hardly noticed, seeing how many choices there are out there and the immediate health improvements and money savings I gained. Maybe I'm just a more go-with-the-flow kind of guy?

Credaholic

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #69 on: October 13, 2014, 08:30:46 AM »
Just reading all these posts of people grumbling about smaller meat portions or tricking their SOs into eating less meat (because they'd complain otherwise) is just... sad. Why is meat so important to everyone that somehow a meal isn't a meal without it? I ate meat for 21 years, then quit cold turkey (pardon the bad pun). I hardly noticed, seeing how many choices there are out there and the immediate health improvements and money savings I gained. Maybe I'm just a more go-with-the-flow kind of guy?

I think for my DH it literally comes down to being hungry. He's a big guy (not horizontally, vertically) who burns a lot of calories all day long. In this situation, people have to relearn how to cook in order to replace meat completely and still be satisfied. And when I say satisfied I mean full, but never mind the fact that many people find meat to be delicious. I'd be pretty dissatisfied if I could never eat brie again. But for those that are less go with the flow regarding their food choices, it's definitely become clear to me that meat can be used as more of a "seasoning" in a meal so you still get the flavor. I'm going to try frying mushrooms in bacon fat tonight to go in our meatless mac and cheese (yeah, I definitely need more meatless meal ideas!)

pork chops are a great idea, I got here late but one of the things I was going to mention is that it seemed like you ate a lot of BEEF. pork is way cheaper. pork butt makes awesome pulled pork in the crockpot (to use for tacos, sandwiches, etc.) and it's pretty cheap, definitely one of my faves.

Considering that DH's fam got together and bought him half a pig for his birthday, we can definitely eat more pork! I know this makes him sound even more meat obsessed, but it's more about being concerned with where his meat comes from.

Which reminds me, I realized we could roast a chicken once a week, eat off it for 3-4 meals, eat another night meatless, and make up the rest with just one package of ground beef, and we'd be eating all of our meat organic for less than $100 a month. Just using this as an example, but I found this to be an encouraging realization!

LibrarIan

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #70 on: October 13, 2014, 08:45:29 AM »
I'm going to try frying mushrooms in bacon fat tonight to go in our meatless mac and cheese (yeah, I definitely need more meatless meal ideas!).

While I think meatless days are certainly a good move for many reasons, you're not technically going completely meatless if you're using something like bacon fat to fry with. A vegetable shortening would certainly do the trick and make it a real meatless meal.

rocksinmyhead

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #71 on: October 13, 2014, 09:16:02 AM »
pork chops are a great idea, I got here late but one of the things I was going to mention is that it seemed like you ate a lot of BEEF. pork is way cheaper. pork butt makes awesome pulled pork in the crockpot (to use for tacos, sandwiches, etc.) and it's pretty cheap, definitely one of my faves.

Considering that DH's fam got together and bought him half a pig for his birthday, we can definitely eat more pork! I know this makes him sound even more meat obsessed, but it's more about being concerned with where his meat comes from.

haha, that's awesome!

I'm going to try frying mushrooms in bacon fat tonight to go in our meatless mac and cheese (yeah, I definitely need more meatless meal ideas!).

While I think meatless days are certainly a good move for many reasons, you're not technically going completely meatless if you're using something like bacon fat to fry with. A vegetable shortening would certainly do the trick and make it a real meatless meal.

I don't know, if the primary reason you're interested in meatless days is financial (vs. health or ethical reasons), I think this is a great idea. assuming you'll still eat bacon semi-regularly, the bacon fat is free, and adds a tasty, meaty flavor. yummmmm.

Aphalite

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #72 on: October 13, 2014, 09:54:43 AM »
OP chiming back in here. Everyone's responses here have been so useful (minus the misdemeanor) and have hopefully had a good impact on our bottom line. I haven't been able to track our grocery purchases to the penny like I wanted to this month (our second child was born, so life is hectic) but I'm roughly keeping it to 1 monthly $100 Costco trip and weekly $50 produce/etc. trips which keeps us in line with my budget goal. I realized our freezer is so stocked full that I don't need to buy any meat at all for at least another month. I've also cut our meat serving size down some (for instance one package of ground beef which used to feed us two meals is now feeding us three) and hiding that fact from DH by making more hearty stir fry type meals where he doesn't even notice. I fried 4 small pork chops a few weeks ago with the intent of using two in a meal later that week. DH got to them before I could serve him and took two for himself in one sitting! I ate the other, and then saved the remaining one, chopped it up and made pork fried rice later that week with brown rice and veggies, and it happily served both of us without either of us feeling deprived. Interesting how that works! I could easily argue that our protein intake wasn't out of whack before, and that we are in very good health so must be eating pretty well, but seeing how easy it's been to cut the portions back a little makes me realize again that doing better than most of America isn't saying much, and there's always room to kick ass more, so thanks for the face punches.

I also instituted meatless Monday last week. DH says, "Aren't Mondays already bad enough?!" But he happily ate his delicious home made macaroni and cheese.

I can't remember if I said before, but I rely on frozen veggies a lot - especially when it's not harvesting season! I've read that frozen veggies can be fresher than the fresh veggies you get at the supermarket because they're flash frozen almost immediately upon being picked. Agree or disagree? Also seem very cost effective.

And meal planning is probably saving my sanity right now, not just my budget. We've eaten at home and avoided take out almost entirely since baby was born. I'm going to give myself a little kudos for that one, because preparing meals is not easy with two under two! It helps a ton knowing what I'm making and what needs to be done.

OP, just wanted to contribute a few things that might not have been said -

As far as frozen veggies, most of the time they are fresher and more nutritious than what you can get at the grocery store, with the exception of shopping in season vegetables (for example, if you grab a head of cauliflower in the summer, it's probably not very fresh) - logically speaking, produce that's in season tends to actually be a lot cheaper (more supply), so it helps both your health and your wallet

As to your assertion that milk helps GERD - while drinking a glass of milk to relieve heartburn may initially ease the discomfort of GERD, milk triggers production of stomach acid later, so it's actually a pretty vicious cycle you're subjecting yourself too. The best thing to drink is always water. To help GERD, the best thing to eat is vegetables (very basic) whereas meat (which is very acidic) usually makes it worse. That's why you usually see meat served with a side of vegetables.

I find that the thing I like most about eating meat is that umami/glutamate feeling. One way to substitute for that on meatless meals is to use glutamate substitutes, such as soy sauce, stock (make it at home with leftover chicken carcasses, it's a cinch and if you boil it down enough it's very low effort to use - think boullion cubes), or tomatoes. Also, combine those elements with low cost protein such as roti chicken or salmon will boost the "meat" profile of those proteins and also save you money over beef products

One thing you could do to reduce portion on meat is make a large cassarole - my wife makes a killer mexican lasagna with corn tortillas, homemade enchilada sauce (spiked with some fish sauce), 1/2 shredded chicken, kale, 2 cans black beans, and tons of aromatics. I crave it and ask her to make it every other week. For reference, I'm a 6'5 215lb dude, so I tend to eat a lot as well, but that will last me 6 meals.

Aphalite

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #73 on: October 13, 2014, 09:56:48 AM »
Oh, also, invest in an immersion circulator so you can purchase tougher cuts of meat such as chuck or ribs. Beef short ribs are probably my favorite cut of meat lately because of how tender you can make it with a slow cook via slow cooker/sous vide style of cooking. The taste is beefier than a 5x as pricey filet too

Mother Fussbudget

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #74 on: October 13, 2014, 11:13:14 AM »
CostCo two essential household appliances: 
Rice Cooker (acts as rice cooker, slow cooker, steamer), and/or
Electric Pressure Cooker (similar functions, but cooks FAST, and GREAT for beans).

I cooked SO MANY meals with just the Rice cooker - especially with it's slow-cook function - that the non-stick coating is shot (after 4 years).  Just got a Cuisinart pressure cooker ($70), and LOVE that it can cook in 1/3 the time of the rice cooker for those nights when I don't think ahead, or get surprised by an additional mouth-to-feed at the last minute.   

I buy bulk pinto beans, and bags of rice (brown and white) at Costco.  I make pressure cooked boston baked beans, then use the 3 cups of the marinate to 1 cup of water to make rice - mix in the pre-cooked beans, and have great meals for a week.  I use 1 quart ziploc bags and the straw technique to remove air, and freeze them flat.  Break into quarters, and put into reusable plastic sandwich boxes. 

Stellar

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #75 on: October 17, 2014, 12:01:13 PM »
You guys have really intricate lists for groceries. :)   

I see organic all over the website.  Am I really killing myself and my family spending $1/lb on HEB seasoned chicken leg quarters?  :-o

Allie

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #76 on: October 17, 2014, 11:34:26 PM »
Also, just because DH eats a lot of meat, doesn't mean you have to.  I'll give DH 6-8 oz of steak and I'll eat 2-3 with lots of veggies/rice.  That way I can get 1-2 lunches out of my leftovers. 

Some ideas that have worked for me to cut down on meat in meals:

ground beef/pork in pasta (e.g., spaghetti with meat sauce, mac-n-cheese with ground beef seasoned with taco seasoning or ground pork seasoned with Italian sausage seasoning)
stir fry
soups/stews - 1lb of meat in 6-8 servings of soup and I "beef it up" with beans, potatoes, or rice

And, sometimes, I make myself something completely different if I'm just not in the mood for meat.  Or I'll make meatless pasta and cook him meatloaf on the side and won't eat it.

+1 to this

My husband enjoys meat with his dinner.  Because I am weirdo picky (not for animal rights reasons) I haven't eaten red meat for as long as I can remember.  Because I do most of the cooking, my husband has gotten to enjoy most of my meatless meals.  But, I can cook a roast or stew with the best of them.  I make meat for the hubbie and a meatless meal that he can eat as a side for me.  I'll eat a burrito with veggies and beans and he will add grilled chicken to his or I'll roast some veggies with cheese and he will eat that with a steak.  If you really like meat too, then obviously this isn't the way to go, but if you enjoy lentils in a stew as much or better than hunks of beef, make a stew with both and give the meat to your guy.

Also, depending on where you live, you may want to consider supplementing your meat in other ways.  We fish and hunt.  This year is a shameful anomaly because our freezer is empty, but we usually get most of our protien from the wild.  Having to butcher a wild animal may be weird for some people, but I imagine it is probably as healthy as organic meat from a farm.  Plus, you know how it was treated after it was slaughtered.  To be fair, my husband does the land mammal butchering.  If you don't have time with the baby (we had a new one last year and didn't get out) you may be able to find a hunter or fisherman who has a freezer that's over flowing and is willing to pass off some of the bounty or barter.  It never hurts to ask. We gave away garabage bags full of salmon and halibut to friends during my first pregnancy.

Finally, there are lots of things you can make yourself.  When you have time, that is!  I am seriously impressed that a baby and a toddler haven't pushed you to eat out all the time.  I find I have better luck passing off my homemade items if I don't try to present them as replacements.  A homemade cliff bar is a flop but a protien ball is a treat.  I get that it isn't a cost savings if you family won't eat it, but there are some subs that may be easier to do if you don't announce they're meant to be a replacement.


2ndTimer

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Re: What does your monthly grocery list look like?
« Reply #77 on: October 18, 2014, 11:24:08 AM »
I think a pig is a great birthday present.  I wish someone would give me one.  Just in case you haven't already found this out, pork bones make great broth.  Better than chicken broth in my opinion.