Author Topic: your definition of scratch cooking  (Read 4769 times)

Dicey

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Re: your definition of scratch cooking
« Reply #50 on: March 11, 2020, 12:16:25 AM »
There's a knack to making tortillas and so far I haven't figured it out. I totally count store-bought tortillas as an ingredient.

Malcat

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Re: your definition of scratch cooking
« Reply #51 on: March 11, 2020, 06:03:47 AM »
There's a knack to making tortillas and so far I haven't figured it out. I totally count store-bought tortillas as an ingredient.

I just started making them, and I find that even when they come out like total shit, they're still infinitely better than the store bought ones that I find taste exactly like the plastic bag they come in.

I don't make bread though. I'm not a baker at all, so on the very rare occasions that I buy bread a few times a year, I consider it an ingredient as well.


Sugaree

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Re: your definition of scratch cooking
« Reply #52 on: March 11, 2020, 06:43:59 AM »
There's a knack to making tortillas and so far I haven't figured it out. I totally count store-bought tortillas as an ingredient.

Mine don't quite come out like what most people think of as tortillas.  More like the the tortillas that you get with a baleada in Honduras.  Thicker, but not as thick as that thing that Taco Bell calls a chalupa.

Dicey

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Re: your definition of scratch cooking
« Reply #53 on: March 11, 2020, 07:12:05 AM »
@Malkynn, @ Sugaree, do either of you have any tips for successful tortilla making? For ex, do you use a press or roller?

Malcat

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Re: your definition of scratch cooking
« Reply #54 on: March 11, 2020, 07:18:27 AM »
@Malkynn, @ Sugaree, do either of you have any tips for successful tortilla making? For ex, do you use a press or roller?

I use an asian style noodle roller, which is a small, plain wood cylinder shape a little thicker than an inch, it gets them paper thin. I didn't have any kind of roller the first few times because I don't bake at all, so I used a wine bottle, which worked pretty well. lol.
I use hot water, as hot as the tap will go, and make sure to rest the dough for awhile.

The ones I made last night were crappier than normal, it was a shitty recipe that didn't call for baking powder and only had the dough rest for 8 minutes, but even then, they were better than plastic bag tortillas.

ETA: my roller looks like this and cost me about a dollar
https://www.twin-city.ca/products/asian-style-rolling-pin-12
« Last Edit: March 11, 2020, 07:20:22 AM by Malkynn »

OtherJen

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Re: your definition of scratch cooking
« Reply #55 on: March 11, 2020, 07:24:15 AM »
@Malkynn, @ Sugaree, do either of you have any tips for successful tortilla making? For ex, do you use a press or roller?

I use an asian style noodle roller, which is a small, plain wood cylinder shape a little thicker than an inch, it gets them paper thin. I didn't have any kind of roller the first few times because I don't bake at all, so I used a wine bottle, which worked pretty well. lol.
I use hot water, as hot as the tap will go, and make sure to rest the dough for awhile.

The ones I made last night were crappier than normal, it was a shitty recipe that didn't call for baking powder and only had the dough rest for 8 minutes, but even then, they were better than plastic bag tortillas.

ETA: my roller looks like this and cost me about a dollar
https://www.twin-city.ca/products/asian-style-rolling-pin-12

Is this for corn or wheat flour tortillas? I only make corn ones and have never added baking powder, but my grandmotherís recipe for flour tortillas calls for that and lard or shortening. I agree that hot water is essential. I add very hot water to the masa harina and knead the dough for several minutes as soon as itís cool enough to handle.

Depending on where you live, you may be able to find a fairly inexpensive tortilla press. Alternatively, you can roll the masa into balls, place each between two pieces of wax paper, and flatten it under a pie plate.

Sugaree

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Re: your definition of scratch cooking
« Reply #56 on: March 11, 2020, 07:31:16 AM »
I just use a French-style rolling pin and roll them out pressed between either parchment paper or a large ziplock bag that's had the sides cut out of. 

Malcat

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Re: your definition of scratch cooking
« Reply #57 on: March 11, 2020, 07:38:48 AM »
@Malkynn, @ Sugaree, do either of you have any tips for successful tortilla making? For ex, do you use a press or roller?

I use an asian style noodle roller, which is a small, plain wood cylinder shape a little thicker than an inch, it gets them paper thin. I didn't have any kind of roller the first few times because I don't bake at all, so I used a wine bottle, which worked pretty well. lol.
I use hot water, as hot as the tap will go, and make sure to rest the dough for awhile.

The ones I made last night were crappier than normal, it was a shitty recipe that didn't call for baking powder and only had the dough rest for 8 minutes, but even then, they were better than plastic bag tortillas.

ETA: my roller looks like this and cost me about a dollar
https://www.twin-city.ca/products/asian-style-rolling-pin-12

Is this for corn or wheat flour tortillas? I only make corn ones and have never added baking powder, but my grandmotherís recipe for flour tortillas calls for that and lard or shortening. I agree that hot water is essential. I add very hot water to the masa harina and knead the dough for several minutes as soon as itís cool enough to handle.

Depending on where you live, you may be able to find a fairly inexpensive tortilla press. Alternatively, you can roll the masa into balls, place each between two pieces of wax paper, and flatten it under a pie plate.

flour, and I typically use oil because I don't have any other use for shortening or lard