Author Topic: Wet shaving  (Read 9227 times)

joerice01

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Wet shaving
« on: March 04, 2012, 07:25:41 PM »
In response to the MMM article (http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2012/03/03/guest-post-shaving-lessons-from-grandpa-money-mustache/).
Do any Mustachians wet shave with a straight razor.
Iv'e been interested in trying it and was wondering is there are any savings to be had. Of course the upfront cost is very high compared to the cartridge razor, but then you can maintain it yourself with very little cost for a long time. (+ a new skill learned.)

Any advice/ thoughts Mustachians?

Sparafusile

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abunn3

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2012, 05:34:05 PM »
Before even finding MMM I had the same thought after getting fed up with expensive cartridges. I didn't want to dive right in with a high up front investment cost before knowing if I liked wet shaving or not, so I did some research and found what amounts to a disposable straight razor and, from what I've read, is what they use in barber shops for sanitary reasons. It's worked really well for me so I decided I didn't want to make the more substantial investment for a good quality steel blade.

I have this blade holder by Parker:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002PQZEHQ/ref=oh_o00_s00_i01_details

And I saw this type of blade holder when I went into an Art of Shaving store:
http://www.amazon.com/Dovo-Silver-Handle-Shavette-Straight/dp/B001ASOD86/ref=pd_sbs_hpc_4

I recommend the Feather blades (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002E4VNUG/ref=oh_o06_s00_i00_details) which you can then cut in half and then each blade can cost as little as 19 cents. Don't need to learn the blade maintenance skill (which was going to be devoting too much time to shaving for me), but still earn badassity points for slicing wiskers with what is essentially a scalpel. It's a steep and often bloody learning curve and you'll want to keep a cartridge blade on hand for when you need a quicker shave.

adam

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2012, 08:56:07 AM »
I have been considering this purchase for a while:
http://www.straightrazor.co/product/VSR-WOOTPD013/Buffalo-Horn-Straight-Razor-and-Practice-Razor.html

seems like the cheapest way to get into straight razors.  While I contemplate the quality of a $39 straight razor bundle I continue to shave with my Merkur Safety Razor instead.

Sparafusile

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2012, 11:01:20 AM »

dinko628

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2012, 03:39:29 PM »
Copied from the comment I left on the MMM post:


I was just reading up about this recently (the old-school vs. disposable razor debate) and I came across some articles from http://artofmanliness.com/ that seemed pretty interesting. I was actually going to go the safety razor (and maybe eventually straight razor) way myself once I had some extra cash and used my the last of my current stash of disposable products. It seemed like the mustachian thing to do (a larger investment to get into, but paying huge dividends in the long run).

A few links, for reference:
http://artofmanliness.com/2008/01/04/how-to-shave-like-your-grandpa/
http://artofmanliness.com/2009/10/06/how-to-straight-razor-shave/
http://www.realmenrealstyle.com/learn-to-shave-like-man/
« Last Edit: March 06, 2012, 07:05:33 PM by Sparafusile »

Mike Key

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2012, 05:20:31 AM »
Yup that Art of Manliness article from 2008 introduced me to shaving with a safety razor and the SAVING ARE SIGNIFICANT. There is a little bit of an upfront cost, but over time it's kind of like buying LED or CFL light bulbs.

I eventually switched to a straight razor, and let me tell you what. Easy to maintain and the best shave I've ever had. Continuously out performs those stupid disposables I was always buying.

And it really becomes a ritual/experience. There is a slight learning curve and maybe you spend a little longer doing it, but the feeling afterwards of sure manliness is pretty awesome.

jdchmiel

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2012, 09:35:20 AM »
I must be blessed with my skin.. I use a gillette cartridge system ( sensor excel, same as my dad, it is a hand me down), and only use one blade a year. I shave face wet, every other day in the shower, and make sure to blow the razor dry when I am done with it.. like purse your lips and blow dust out of a computer fan kind of blowing. If I wait more than 1 day between shaves, the hairs get too long and it hurts. Every day seems excessive.. I am a red head so 5 o clock shadow is not too terrible the next day.  Keep the cartridge dry and it stays nice and sharp for a LONG time.  And the generic refills from target / walmart / grocery store work fine :)

orangeclocker

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2012, 02:19:38 PM »
I just signed up to test the Dollar Shave Club. I just loved their marketing video. Yeah, it's not as mustachian as a straight razor but it's better than full disposables.  $3/month for the basic handle/blade package. You get 4 blades per month (double-blades).

Check them out: https://www.dollarshaveclub.com/ref/rrz/c2t3id

Full disclosure - the link contains a referral code. you sign up, I get a month of free blades; you refer your friend, you get a month of free blades.


Forticus

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2015, 05:22:45 AM »
My son asked for a shaving tutorial this morning to get rid of his first mustache down.
I gave him my 4 weeks used disposable (to postpone the cut-tutorial), pointed to our standard soap on the sink and to the water.
Then I got a new disposable for myself and started.
He asked about shaving cream or foam. I guess they discussed it among friends. I told him about my first and second tutorial when my father gave me his cream and aftershave. I never used them since. And as soon as it looked bearable (around 18) I keep a beard, to keep the torture and smell off my (then) soft skin.

And a brush?, my dear son asked.
Boy, you got two healthy hands!

P.S. to those who are afraid of cuts:  cold water on the cut, then stick a small piece of toilet paper on it. Then you walk into the office, upright as a man. Bonus: As long as they shit-chat on you, they don't distract you from work.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2015, 08:48:18 AM by Forticus »

AlwaysLearningToSave

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2015, 06:29:18 AM »
I use an Edwin jagger de8911 safety razor with Crystal blades, a D.R. Harris shaving soap puck, and a cheapo boars hair brush. I switched away from a Mach 3 razor and canned cream because of constant razor burn and ingrown hairs that would leave my neck a bloody mess (literally and in the British pejorative sense).

My shave quality has gone WAY up and the cost per shave WAY down. Buying Mach 3 blades at SAMs club (as cheap as I ever found them) my cost per shave was upwards of 25 cents per shave. I can buy 100 crystal blades online for $12.00. That is almost two years worth of shaving at five shaves per razor, five shaves a week. My cost per shave now is about 5 cents per shave, maybe less.

Be careful because you can blow as much money as you want on wet shaving. But if you make smart choices, it is very mustachian. Buy a sample pack of blades to figure out what works best for you, because there truly is a lot of variation between blades.  Crystal blades are best for me because they are sharp enough to cut my coarse beard but are gentle enough for my sensitive skin.

I suggest investing in a quality shaving soap. They will last far longer than a tub of cream. It takes a little work to get the hang of lathering, but I've had my first pick of shave soap for 4 months now and have hardly made a dent in it. I would not be surprised if I get close to a years worth of shaves out of that soap puck.

spokey doke

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2015, 07:58:42 AM »
I've done straight razors, investing in a high quality razor and all the fixings, read a ton, watched videos, and stayed with it for many weeks...for me, while very appealing philosophically, in practice is was a total PITA for a poorer shave. I have a number of friends who were really into the idea as well and they all bailed too.

While the prices (and designs) of cartridge razors have been ridiculous for some time, there is more than just marketing to their popularity - super easy, comfortable, results.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2015, 08:00:39 AM by spokey doke »

JLee

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2015, 08:02:46 AM »
I use a DE safety razor. The handle was about $30 and I bought a 100 pack of blades for ~$9.  That was almost three years ago and I still have well over half (maybe 2/3) of the blades remaining.

Scandium

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #13 on: July 21, 2015, 08:15:59 AM »
wow, some people are really into this.. I just don't understand why no love for electric razors? TO me it seems cheaper and more convenient. Blades, foams, creams, handles, sharpening.. I don't have time for that hassle! And it turns out my high-quality braun shaver cost less than a straight razor! Turn on, rub on face for 2 min. Done. Does the job, perfectly good shave. Except a handful of times I've never done anything else. I can't imagine taking the time during the week to rub three different creams on my face just to shave. Maybe during the weekend but not on a day to day basis. How do you people have time?

In terms of cost my razor was $130. And that was a bit of a splurge. My previous one lasted 8 years, and could have squeezed more out of it too. New razor blocks are expensive at $35, but in my experience only need one about every 18 - 24 months. And I've gone longer. No foam or creams. Electricity cost? Pennies? So total of less than $1.50/month. Razor amortized is $1.35/month with my 8 year schedule. I think a decent price for extremely convenient shaving with minimal wasted time!

edit; actually the shaver block is only $28, so even cheaper
« Last Edit: July 21, 2015, 08:22:33 AM by Scandium »

Forticus

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #14 on: July 21, 2015, 09:04:39 AM »
I did electric for a couple of years. Don't recall why I dropped it. Perhaps loss of time, fiddling around with power supply and maintanance. On a day to day basis I take an  ... umm ...  "dry wet shave" (?), no soap, no water, just the blade.

Rosbif

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #15 on: July 21, 2015, 09:26:32 AM »
I get the convenience of an electric, but I tried three different ones, all of which gave pretty bad in-growing hairs. Not cool.

Straight razor holder, disposable blades off amazon, soap bowl at 1.75 from the local supermarket. Cost me about 45 bucks for the last five years of shaving. Regular soap will do if you're really pushing the savings. I guess a stropped razor will eventually be cheaper, but the 20 minutes a week are definitely at a premium in my life right now!

Upsides: quality of shave second to none, feeling of "manliness", price, no charging needed, compact.

Downsides: can't shave in the shower without looking, can't shave at the wheel like some crazy people, can't fly with shaving kit in hand luggage any more, takes slightly longer than electric (but not much, once you have the hang of it). Shaving with a shop-bought blade once you've flown somewhere feels terrible.

Scandium

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #16 on: July 21, 2015, 11:42:33 AM »
I get the convenience of an electric, but I tried three different ones, all of which gave pretty bad in-growing hairs. Not cool.

Straight razor holder, disposable blades off amazon, soap bowl at 1.75 from the local supermarket. Cost me about 45 bucks for the last five years of shaving. Regular soap will do if you're really pushing the savings. I guess a stropped razor will eventually be cheaper, but the 20 minutes a week are definitely at a premium in my life right now!

Upsides: quality of shave second to none, feeling of "manliness", price, no charging needed, compact.

Downsides: can't shave in the shower without looking, can't shave at the wheel like some crazy people, can't fly with shaving kit in hand luggage any more, takes slightly longer than electric (but not much, once you have the hang of it). Shaving with a shop-bought blade once you've flown somewhere feels terrible.

yeah I read the art of manliness article and it sounded like a bit of hipster nostalgia. Apparently you're supposed to strop the blade before every shave? Oh sure, I'll get right on that while I try to keep an eye on the baby, buttoning my shirt and being late for a meeting.. And a "good' straight razor is $150-300, all the way up to one that was $1,500!

hm, I've had a few ingrown hairs, but didn't realize it could be due to the razor. Maybe I'm lucky.

AlwaysLearningToSave

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #17 on: July 21, 2015, 12:00:14 PM »
I get the convenience of an electric, but I tried three different ones, all of which gave pretty bad in-growing hairs. Not cool.

Straight razor holder, disposable blades off amazon, soap bowl at 1.75 from the local supermarket. Cost me about 45 bucks for the last five years of shaving. Regular soap will do if you're really pushing the savings. I guess a stropped razor will eventually be cheaper, but the 20 minutes a week are definitely at a premium in my life right now!

Upsides: quality of shave second to none, feeling of "manliness", price, no charging needed, compact.

Downsides: can't shave in the shower without looking, can't shave at the wheel like some crazy people, can't fly with shaving kit in hand luggage any more, takes slightly longer than electric (but not much, once you have the hang of it). Shaving with a shop-bought blade once you've flown somewhere feels terrible.

I agree. Electric razors gave me a poor shave and razor burn / ingrown hairs.  No better than cartridge razors. Since switching to a double edge safety razor, my skin has been clearer than it has ever been before and I get the smoothest shaves I've ever had. No bumps, razor burn, or blood on my shirt collar.

The double edge safety razor is ideal for me because you get the convenience of disposable blades with a shave nearly as good as a straight razor (I'm told... I've never actually used a straight razor). And they are dirt cheap compared to cartridge razors.

AlwaysLearningToSave

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #18 on: July 21, 2015, 12:29:43 PM »
You know that feeling you got after discovering MMM, seeing the light and realizing that most of what you learned about finances was wrong? That feeling of wanting to shake everyone by the head so that they will snap out of it and see the light, too? That feeling of being grateful for having discovered it but irked that it was concealed from you for so long? That feeling of "where has this been my whole life!?!"?

That is how I felt after discovering wet shaving. It's that much better than cartridge razors or electric razors for me. Maybe they aren't too bad for other guys, but shaving was miserable for me until I discovered wet shaving. Now I actually enjoy shaving, get quality shaves, and spend much less money doing it. Where has this been all my life!?!

JLee

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #19 on: July 21, 2015, 03:06:59 PM »
wow, some people are really into this.. I just don't understand why no love for electric razors? TO me it seems cheaper and more convenient. Blades, foams, creams, handles, sharpening.. I don't have time for that hassle! And it turns out my high-quality braun shaver cost less than a straight razor! Turn on, rub on face for 2 min. Done. Does the job, perfectly good shave. Except a handful of times I've never done anything else. I can't imagine taking the time during the week to rub three different creams on my face just to shave. Maybe during the weekend but not on a day to day basis. How do you people have time?

In terms of cost my razor was $130. And that was a bit of a splurge. My previous one lasted 8 years, and could have squeezed more out of it too. New razor blocks are expensive at $35, but in my experience only need one about every 18 - 24 months. And I've gone longer. No foam or creams. Electricity cost? Pennies? So total of less than $1.50/month. Razor amortized is $1.35/month with my 8 year schedule. I think a decent price for extremely convenient shaving with minimal wasted time!

edit; actually the shaver block is only $28, so even cheaper
I have an electric shaver and it tears up my neck if I tried to get a close shave. It's also not remotely "close" as far as shaves go. :(

$1.35/mo for the razor and another $1.16/mo (assuming 24mo replacement) for the block -- but....my handle should last me the rest of my life, let's say I live to 78? That'd be 50 years, and right now I'm getting about 7 years (estimated- I have no idea how many I have left, just more than half) out of $9 in blades...   $32.99 handle, and let's be generous and say $2/yr in blades.  22 cents a month plus shaving cream (or shave in the shower without any).

Either option is far cheaper than going with a Mach 3 cartridge!

JimLahey

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #20 on: July 21, 2015, 10:22:20 PM »
I bought a safety razor last summer. The initial cost for the razor, brush, soap, and 100 blades was around $80. I still have a few packs of blades left. I use Arko shaving soap which is great and inexpensive. I bought a case of it so I should be good on soap for a few years. I use plastic salsa bowls for lathering. Yearly cost should only be about $10 for the blades. It is a longer process but I get a closer shave with little to no irritation.

FIRE me

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Re: Wet shaving
« Reply #21 on: July 21, 2015, 10:45:36 PM »
In response to the MMM article (http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2012/03/03/guest-post-shaving-lessons-from-grandpa-money-mustache/).
Do any Mustachians wet shave with a straight razor.
Iv'e been interested in trying it and was wondering is there are any savings to be had. Of course the upfront cost is very high compared to the cartridge razor, but then you can maintain it yourself with very little cost for a long time. (+ a new skill learned.)

Any advice/ thoughts Mustachians?

I wet shave with disposables. I get 3 to 5 months out of one disposable razor. So I get 3 or 4 years out of a bag of a dozen. I like the green handle Schick ones.

I don't buy shaving cream. I buy cheap Sauve shampoo and put it in a hand soap dispenser, which I use for both hand washing and shaving.

I have a few straight razors that I paid nothing for. They are quite unwieldy. No way I would want a straight razor anywhere near my throat.