Author Topic: Water transmission lines through the backyard  (Read 934 times)

jamesbond007

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Water transmission lines through the backyard
« on: November 10, 2021, 12:19:34 PM »
A friend of mine is in contract to purchase a house. The preliminary title report came back, and it is showing water transmission pipelines going right through the backyard. The pipeline map, dated June 1953, shows a 14inch and a 36inch pipeline. It runs through the entire street. Now, these houses were built in 1955. He is concerned. I told him not to worry. But is this really a big deal? FWIW, the report mentioned 14 feet and 36 feet. Those are some HUGE pipes. I am sure it's a typo in the report.


What are the risks, besides easements? How bad can this be? He is concerned that he may not get his loan approved because this? Are his concerns valid? My main question is if the pipeline existed in 1953 and the building constructed in 1955, then did somebody mess up while issuing permits about 75 years ago? Or are the maps incorrectly showing the location?


I thought I'd post it here to educate myself.

therethere

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Re: Water transmission lines through the backyard
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2021, 12:33:13 PM »
That should not be a concern at all. If the line ruptures and affects his property he will get compensated. If they have to do maintenance and enter his property he may also be able to request compensation. No one messed up. Plenty of houses have water pipes and gas lines on their property.

36" pipe sounds huge, but it's possible. He could even have a 36" gas pipe on his property and it likely wouldn't be a permitting issue.

FYI most greenways (think paved pathways and parks in suburbs) have pipelines under them.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2021, 12:35:47 PM by therethere »

jamesbond007

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Re: Water transmission lines through the backyard
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2021, 01:07:16 PM »
That should not be a concern at all. If the line ruptures and affects his property he will get compensated. If they have to do maintenance and enter his property he may also be able to request compensation. No one messed up. Plenty of houses have water pipes and gas lines on their property.

36" pipe sounds huge, but it's possible. He could even have a 36" gas pipe on his property and it likely wouldn't be a permitting issue.

FYI most greenways (think paved pathways and parks in suburbs) have pipelines under them.

Thank you. This friend of mine called the water district and they confirmed that they are not active. They also cautioned that they may be activated any time if there is a need.

Askel

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Re: Water transmission lines through the backyard
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2021, 03:12:03 PM »
If there's any concern about where exactly they are located, call in a MISS DIG or whatever your state equivalent is.  I mark underground fiber optic cables all the time.  We never concern ourselves about who is requesting it or why, we just mark it.   

In theory, we only have to get our spray painted line within 6 feet though. Once you get within 6 feet of our marking- you can only hand dig.

If you can catch the guy doing the marking- you can often get details like how deep it is underground as well.   



trollwithamustache

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Re: Water transmission lines through the backyard
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2021, 04:25:20 PM »
The easement means they cannot build over the water lines. As long as there are no plans for installing an inground pool, it is likely fine.

PDXTabs

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Re: Water transmission lines through the backyard
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2021, 05:28:43 PM »
The easement means they cannot build over the water lines. As long as there are no plans for installing an inground pool, it is likely fine.

Yes, I have a 13 year old house with an easement for the power company and an adjacent business. In the 13 years since the house was built neither have had to use the easement, and it doesn't particularly bother me.

EDITed to add that the easement is called out in the title documentation for my house. I know exactly where it starts and stops.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2021, 05:31:08 PM by PDXTabs »

sonofsven

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Re: Water transmission lines through the backyard
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2021, 09:17:15 AM »
Just posting to say, read your easement carefully. A family member bought raw land recently and assumed the easement meant one thing when in reality it meant another.
The land was cheap, but nonetheless they now have  15 of their land dedicated to a driveway for the neighboring lot because the buyer of that lot could, and did, read the easement correctly.

 

Wow, a phone plan for fifteen bucks!