Author Topic: Was offered a job that I was tempting in but I still need to fill out a job app.  (Read 2902 times)

RedMaple

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The job application asks to list my earnings from previous jobs. Previous jobs paid 1.5 when I worked over 40 hours, and I always worked over 40 hours. Current job doesn't pay 1.5 (and I will always be working over 40 hours). Would it be sufficient if I took my annual salary from previous jobs and divided by 2080? Is this a reasonable calculation to make? I can prove the total amounts with a w-2, so technically I'm not lying.

SwordGuy

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Leave the $ fields blank.  It's none of their business.

If they ask, tell them that you should be paid your market worth to the company, and your market worth to other companies in years past has no bearing on that.

RedMaple

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Leave the $ fields blank.  It's none of their business.

If they ask, tell them that you should be paid your market worth to the company, and your market worth to other companies in years past has no bearing on that.


What if they pressure me to put a number?

pbkmaine

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As long as you can explain how you got the numbers, you will be fine with the method you discussed.


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MDM

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Leave the $ fields blank.  It's none of their business.

If they ask, tell them that you should be paid your market worth to the company, and your market worth to other companies in years past has no bearing on that.


What if they pressure me to put a number?

Read http://www.kalzumeus.com/2012/01/23/salary-negotiation/ first.

RedMaple

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Leave the $ fields blank.  It's none of their business.

If they ask, tell them that you should be paid your market worth to the company, and your market worth to other companies in years past has no bearing on that.


What if they pressure me to put a number?

Read http://www.kalzumeus.com/2012/01/23/salary-negotiation/ first.

Thanks! I'll check it out.

LeRainDrop

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Alison at "Ask A Manager" addresses this issue, as well:  http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2014/01/29/how-to-respond-to-employer-requests-for-your-salary-history

Like SwordGuy said, I would leave the $ fields blank.  Then when they follow-up with you, use Alison's strategies to sidestep the question.

RedMaple

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Alison at "Ask A Manager" addresses this issue, as well:  http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2014/01/29/how-to-respond-to-employer-requests-for-your-salary-history

Like SwordGuy said, I would leave the $ fields blank.  Then when they follow-up with you, use Alison's strategies to sidestep the question.

Thanks for the link

Guesl982374

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If they refuse to accept the application unless you put in a number (even after all the sidestepping attempts) then fill in the honest answer from past jobs but be clear on what you are willing to accept/what your market rate is.

My past example: A recruiter claimed they wouldn't pass along my resume unless I gave them what I am being paid after days of side stepping attempts on my part. I clearly articulated that I know I am significantly below market at my current pay of $'xx'K but would not be willing to take a job for market rate which I believe is $'abc'K. Typically these questions get ask to make sure that 1) the employer isn't wasting their time if they can't afford the recruit or 2) the recruit isn't at the right level for a specific job.