Author Topic: Two weeks notice (Dilemma now Update)  (Read 4238 times)

Easye418

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Two weeks notice (Dilemma now Update)
« on: September 14, 2016, 11:48:57 AM »
To add on to my other topic, so I accepted the position.  Now I have to give my two weeks notice.  My official start date will be October 3rd.  I take my drug screen tomorrow.  Should I give my two weeks notice on Friday or wait till Monday?  Technically, two weeks would be from this Friday.  Any one have a good template?

(Aligned to the right)
Your Name
Address
Contact Details
(Aligned on the left)
Employer's Name
Job Title
Business Name
Business Address
Date
Dear Employers' Name,

Please accept this letter as my formal resignation from the role of (your role) at (business). As per my employment contract, I am giving you 2 weeks notice and my last day will be on the (2 weeks from current date).

I would like to thank you and the other team members for the opportunities and support I have been given while working at (business) over the last 5 years. I have enjoyed working with the team at (business) and wish you and the team members success in the future. (Again optional, if you have had a good experience with the business explain why, and at the end wish the business success)

Yours Sincerely,
Your Name
« Last Edit: September 15, 2016, 08:10:11 AM by Easye418 »

v8rx7guy

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Re: Two weeks notice?
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2016, 11:53:34 AM »
 I would wait until Monday because you are working thru the final friday (the 30th) which is two "work weeks" from Monday.  This is, of course, assuming you work Monday-Friday typically.  Be prepared for the company to tell you that you are done and to pack up the same day you give your two weeks... happens all the time.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2016, 11:55:38 AM by v8rx7guy »

Easye418

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Re: Two weeks notice?
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2016, 11:58:12 AM »
I would wait until Monday because you are working thru the final friday (the 30th) which is two "work weeks" from Monday.  This is, of course, assuming you work Monday-Friday typically.  Be prepared for the company to tell you that you are done and to pack up the same day you give your two weeks... happens all the time.

Okay,  I was going to do it on Monday, however, I saw this clause for my vacation time:

"Pay any unused accrued vacation provided that the employee provides a two week written notice, subject to applicable state law requirements or"

I don't think my company is going to screw me over, but I want to follow the book and leave in good terms.

Is it considered two work weeks or two actual weeks?

Edit:  I am going to give it on Friday morning to be safe.  I don't want to lose out on 60 hours of vacation time
« Last Edit: September 14, 2016, 12:01:01 PM by Easye418 »

JLee

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Re: Two weeks notice?
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2016, 12:00:28 PM »
I would wait until Monday because you are working thru the final friday (the 30th) which is two "work weeks" from Monday.  This is, of course, assuming you work Monday-Friday typically.  Be prepared for the company to tell you that you are done and to pack up the same day you give your two weeks... happens all the time.

Okay,  I was going to do it on Monday, however, I saw this clause for my vacation time:

"Pay any unused accrued vacation provided that the employee provides a two week written notice, subject to applicable state law requirements or"

I don't think my company is going to screw me over, but I want to follow the book and leave in good terms.

Is it considered two work weeks or two actual weeks?

I'm not sure, but I would lean towards the conservative side and go for two full weeks.

v8rx7guy

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Re: Two weeks notice?
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2016, 12:01:44 PM »
I would wait until Monday because you are working thru the final friday (the 30th) which is two "work weeks" from Monday.  This is, of course, assuming you work Monday-Friday typically.  Be prepared for the company to tell you that you are done and to pack up the same day you give your two weeks... happens all the time.

Okay,  I was going to do it on Monday, however, I saw this clause for my vacation time:

"Pay any unused accrued vacation provided that the employee provides a two week written notice, subject to applicable state law requirements or"

I don't think my company is going to screw me over, but I want to follow the book and leave in good terms.

Is it considered two work weeks or two actual weeks?

Well then, that's new information. If that makes you feel more comfortable, follow the calendar and give your two weeks on Friday.  I really don't think it makes that big of a difference...

Easye418

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Re: Two weeks notice?
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2016, 12:02:59 PM »
On another note, what is the protocol about talking about my new position?  Should I talk freely about the company I am going to or should I just say I am moving on to a new opportunity?

Axecleaver

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Re: Two weeks notice?
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2016, 12:07:30 PM »
Always leave it vague, never specify where you're going. I've heard of offers being rescinded when a boss calls their contacts at New Corp to deep-six your offer. Happens a lot especially if you're in a very insular industry. You should provide a personal email address for people to keep in touch with you, that's generally accepted practice and helps you keep your networking in place.

Easye418

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Re: Two weeks notice?
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2016, 12:14:26 PM »
Always leave it vague, never specify where you're going. I've heard of offers being rescinded when a boss calls their contacts at New Corp to deep-six your offer. Happens a lot especially if you're in a very insular industry. You should provide a personal email address for people to keep in touch with you, that's generally accepted practice and helps you keep your networking in place.

Thanks, I think I will do that.  Maybe I will share that on the last day where I am going or not at all.

If asked, I will just keep it to "I am taking a new position with a company in the area".
« Last Edit: September 14, 2016, 12:16:35 PM by Easye418 »

plog

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Re: Two weeks notice?
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2016, 02:02:49 PM »
Do it on a Friday, 1-2 hours before you go home.

1.  This just lowers the awkwardness level.  You get the weekend to personally notify any coworkers you are close with and spread the word informally.

2.  You may be done working for that company at that moment.  Many companies say, 'Resignation accepted, no two weeks necessary, please leave now.'.  You get credit for the 2 weeks, they just don't want you around because they fear your unknown intentions.  For this reason, get your personal items in order, grab contact info for people you might want to talk to later and then hand in your resignation.


terran

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Re: Two weeks notice?
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2016, 02:10:22 PM »
For this reason, get your personal items in order, grab contact info for people you might want to talk to later and then hand in your resignation.

But don't email contact info to yourself. I seem to remember a thread here or on the bogleheads forum about some guy getting sued by his former company after he emailed himself client contact info when leaving a job.

Easye418

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Re: Two weeks notice?
« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2016, 02:14:25 PM »
Do it on a Friday, 1-2 hours before you go home.

1.  This just lowers the awkwardness level.  You get the weekend to personally notify any coworkers you are close with and spread the word informally.

2.  You may be done working for that company at that moment.  Many companies say, 'Resignation accepted, no two weeks necessary, please leave now.'.  You get credit for the 2 weeks, they just don't want you around because they fear your unknown intentions.  For this reason, get your personal items in order, grab contact info for people you might want to talk to later and then hand in your resignation.


For this reason, get your personal items in order, grab contact info for people you might want to talk to later and then hand in your resignation.

But don't email contact info to yourself. I seem to remember a thread here or on the bogleheads forum about some guy getting sued by his former company after he emailed himself client contact info when leaving a job.

Yes, I will handle all of this accordingly, most likely tomorrow.  Then Friday, I will have my letter ready and give it to my boss, Friday at 2PM.  I really respect my boss that I report to so I don't want to just drop it on him.

I have a Doc appointment Friday at 4PM so I have to leave early, I am going to cover that off with my boss tomorrow.  Not the best timing, but I can't miss it.  Should I possibly give it to him earlier?

LeRainDrop

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Re: Two weeks notice?
« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2016, 02:32:51 PM »
Please read this advice from Alison Green at Ask A Manager.  She is spot on.  Workplace issues are her forte.  There are actually a lot of MMM-ers who read/comment on her askamanager.org blog regularly.

http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2015/10/19/everything-you-need-to-know-about-resigning

Easye418

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Re: Two weeks notice (Dilemma now Update)
« Reply #12 on: September 15, 2016, 08:11:04 AM »
Ugh, my boss just told me that he will be out of the office tomorrow.  I don't want to blindside him and I definitely want to resign to him.

Do I give him the letter today at 3PM?

Also, for documentation purposes, how should I word it?  Using today's date, using tomorrow's date, for 09/30?
« Last Edit: September 15, 2016, 08:18:56 AM by Easye418 »

Axecleaver

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Re: Two weeks notice (Dilemma now Update)
« Reply #13 on: September 15, 2016, 08:47:03 AM »
Make it for today, and provide a "last day." You can keep the Friday date of 9/30 as your last day. Always, always resign in person. Good luck!

ZiziPB

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Re: Two weeks notice (Dilemma now Update)
« Reply #14 on: September 15, 2016, 09:24:26 AM »
Ugh, my boss just told me that he will be out of the office tomorrow.  I don't want to blindside him and I definitely want to resign to him.

Do I give him the letter today at 3PM?

Also, for documentation purposes, how should I word it?  Using today's date, using tomorrow's date, for 09/30?

I would talk to your manager in person before the end of the day.  As part of the conversation, ask what you need to provide in writing to document the process.

dividendman

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Re: Two weeks notice (Dilemma now Update)
« Reply #15 on: September 15, 2016, 09:25:03 AM »
The body of the letter shouldn't have any thanking or personal info on what you're going to do. I have resigned several times from numerous positions and have had many people who report to me resign over the years and:

"The intent of this letter is to inform you of my resignation effective September 30th 2016."

Works just fine.

You owe them nothing (not even the two weeks, if you want to make it a couple days shy of two weeks that's fine too).

LeRainDrop

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Re: Two weeks notice (Dilemma now Update)
« Reply #16 on: September 15, 2016, 01:11:41 PM »
Ugh, my boss just told me that he will be out of the office tomorrow.  I don't want to blindside him and I definitely want to resign to him.

Do I give him the letter today at 3PM?

Also, for documentation purposes, how should I word it?  Using today's date, using tomorrow's date, for 09/30?

Please, did you read this excellent advice from Alison?  What you need to do is SPEAK to him first, and then if he wants a confirming letter, give it to him after you talk.  Date it whichever date you actually hand it over.  The best wording is in Alison's advice column.

Please read this advice from Alison Green at Ask A Manager.  She is spot on.  Workplace issues are her forte.  There are actually a lot of MMM-ers who read/comment on her askamanager.org blog regularly.

http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2015/10/19/everything-you-need-to-know-about-resigning


Easye418

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Re: Two weeks notice (Dilemma now Update)
« Reply #17 on: September 15, 2016, 07:31:20 PM »
Turned in letter. Boss was shocked but happy. It's just the relationship we have, went very smoothly.

Primm

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Re: Two weeks notice (Dilemma now Update)
« Reply #18 on: September 15, 2016, 07:45:31 PM »
Is it not a "thing" where you live to provide your current employer as a referee for a potential new job? I've never had a job change where my manager hasn't known about the offer almost before I did, or at least been asking regularly "have you heard anything from <potential new employer> yet?" So no resignation I've ever written has been a surprise.

Or am I an exception and just never realised it?

HydroJim

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Re: Two weeks notice (Dilemma now Update)
« Reply #19 on: September 16, 2016, 07:30:16 AM »
Is it not a "thing" where you live to provide your current employer as a referee for a potential new job? I've never had a job change where my manager hasn't known about the offer almost before I did, or at least been asking regularly "have you heard anything from <potential new employer> yet?" So no resignation I've ever written has been a surprise.

Or am I an exception and just never realised it?

Wow, I've never heard of that. I think only if you're applying to another opportunity within the same company would you ever tell your boss. Even then, seems like it could make things awkward. In my experience, I've never indicated to any boss that I'm leaving until I know the start date of my new job.

LeRainDrop

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Re: Two weeks notice (Dilemma now Update)
« Reply #20 on: September 16, 2016, 09:58:20 AM »
Hi, Primm, it's very common to ask that your current employer not be contacted by the prospective employer since most people don't want their current employer to know about their job search.  In some cases, if your current employer becomes aware that you are looking for a new job, then your current employment is put at risk, as they could decide to fire you for that reason (assuming you're an employee at-will, which is most common in the US).  Of course, there can be circumstances that make it reasonable for your current manager to know of your job search, but that's more the exception than the norm.  Ideal references in the US would be people who previously managed your work and who would speak very positively about your performance.

Primm

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Re: Two weeks notice (Dilemma now Update)
« Reply #21 on: September 17, 2016, 05:22:51 AM »
Maybe it's because here (at least when I've been on selection panels) we select an applicant, then check references, then offer them the job. They decline (or references don't check out which rarely happens) then we move to the next person on the list.

So the current employer doesn't find out you're looking until you are offered the position.

How do you manage if you've been in a job for a long time then? Case in point - I've just changed jobs (well, given notice and start in a few weeks). I've been working where I am for 10 years now, so my referees are my manager and my director.

LeRainDrop

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Re: Two weeks notice (Dilemma now Update)
« Reply #22 on: September 17, 2016, 03:27:16 PM »
Maybe it's because here (at least when I've been on selection panels) we select an applicant, then check references, then offer them the job. They decline (or references don't check out which rarely happens) then we move to the next person on the list.

So the current employer doesn't find out you're looking until you are offered the position.

Ah, yes, that's one way to do it here.  An employer can give an offer contingent on a final reference check.  In that case, perhaps they checked your other references, and then wait to check with your current employer until after the offer is already given.

Quote
How do you manage if you've been in a job for a long time then? Case in point - I've just changed jobs (well, given notice and start in a few weeks). I've been working where I am for 10 years now, so my referees are my manager and my director.

Yeah, this is really hard.  I was at my last employer for nine years, so I had the same issue.  In those cases, typically you would have had more than one manager over the years, so you would ask people who used to manage you but no longer do.  Sometimes those people have left your current employer, so there's no concern about having them be a reference.  Other times, they are still with your current employer but just no longer manage you.  Hopefully you've developed a good enough relationship with them that they'd be willing to give the reference and keep your confidentiality.  This latter situation is not uncommon because these managers are typically already in your favor and want what's best for you, even if that means losing you to another employer.  In some instances, you may have a work environment with multiple concurrent managers (like I was an attorney at a big law firm and had multiple partners supervising my work), and then you may pick some of the more trustworthy managers to be a reference for you.  Yes, you're telling certain people at your current employer that you're looking for another job, but you're only keeping it within a trusted circle and not telling HR or the-powers-that-be at your current employer.  It can be awkward, no doubt.