Author Topic: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?  (Read 6290 times)

geraltofrivia

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Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« on: July 23, 2017, 09:35:08 AM »
Hello. First off I apologize for the length of this post

So basically I was accepted into an expensive dental school on the east coast. After 4 years I'd be in the ditch around 430k. With my undergrad expenses that would be 460k. Not really a fun way to start at 28  (I'm 23 right now). Another issue is that through introspection I found myself to be somewhat introverted. I'm not shy by any stretch and can definitely carry a conversation, make eye contact, etc., it's just that I enjoy solitude somewhat more. That being said, I'm somewhat despondent at the thought of having to pander to patients who may at times be needy or sentimental. I have a pretty aggressive personality and often argue when argued with and this is probably a terrible character for a dentist. Should I stick it through and accept my place at this dental school or change careers? As immature as it sounds, I applied to dental school solely at the thought of being rich. Having gained more maturity, I know that dentists are guaranteed this style of existence, especially in the more urban areas that I prefer to live in.

Now I'm at a complete and utter loss. I'm 23 (24 soon) and still living with my parents. I always do well on tests (SAT, DAT, GRE) and have a pretty high gpa, but my lack of vision always leaves me in my parent's house wondering what I should do. It's pathetic but I realize that I'm a fairly materialistic person. I always put my 100% in anything I do and I like giving people their money's worth if I'm being paid to do something. I've been a tutor for almost eight years and it's something I enjoy doing but I can't see myself making a full-time career out of being a teacher. I was thinking of going into business but I heard the hours are murderous in the field that interests me more than the others: accounting.

Here are possible careers I've been considering and the issues I have with them

1. High-school teacher (possible community college) - I actually like teaching a bit and I've been teaching both younger children and teenagers since I was 16/17 but I'm not sure about the pay and job security. I would definitely try to teach one of the sciences of mathematics.

2. Accounting (tax route) - Pros: High opportunity for advancement, stable salary, crucial in all businesses  Cons: Job loss if the tax code is simplified?, automation threats? I don't have much of anything in terms of a business-like background so not sure how easily I could find a master's program that would take me in

3. Dentist - Pros: Excellent job security; more-or-less guaranteed high salary, great hours   Cons: Dealing with *some* irascible patients, dealing with people afraid to even look at you, INSANE debt that I would carry over into my mid-30s.

Just the three I've been mulling over. Are there any other jobs that would suit me?

My strengths: quantitative stuff (science, math),  Strong reading comprehension/verbal skills (I enjoy reading and my vocabulary is pretty fancy ha), good problem solver

Weaknesses: A bit indifferent to human emotions (not much of a philanthropist, but I am a nice enough person that will help others when I see an opportunity, more out of a sense of doing the right thing than being genuinely sympathetic), somewhat of an A-type personality and arrogant when working.


My big fears are the threats of automation and job security in general. Thanks for any advice and all advice is very much appreciated

« Last Edit: July 23, 2017, 09:39:48 AM by geraltofrivia »

GizmoTX

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2017, 09:41:23 AM »
What is your undergrad degree?

digitalfusion

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2017, 10:40:30 AM »
I encourage you to look at the desire to be a dentist further before making any choices.  Obviously you need to be interested in it, and have a desire to help people.  I don't necessarily agree with your attitude towards arguing.  It may be worse to be in a position where you are subservient to others instead of being independent as a dentist with no boss over you.  Dentists can often make some money, and if you don't want to talk to patients, although its longer, apply for oral surgery residency where the patents are more asleep then awake while you work, plus more $$.  You would need to be extremely diligent in paying off the debt when getting out of school, and the problem is buying a practice or starting a practice from scratch is expensive as well.  If you get a job at a practice when you get out, live like your still a student for a few years, you can make some significant progress if your willing to consider the sacrifice.  There are also many different specialties that pay well if your not specifically interested in teeth but still want to help people. physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy all get paid high, but again, more talking with patients.  Perhaps you want to take the MCAT and do med school / anesthesia.

geraltofrivia

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2017, 10:42:14 AM »
natural science - and that's part of my problem also. It was a very vague degree that basically set you up to go to medical school or dental school. I took classes like:

General Bio
General Chem
Organic Chemistry
Physics
Vertebrate Physio w/ lab
Advanced Microbiology w/ lab
Advanced Microanatomy
Neuroscience
Vertebrate Anatomy
Research and Design
Environmental Science

Some others but can't recall off the top of my head

MrsWolfeRN

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2017, 10:52:24 AM »
You could consider becoming a pharmacist. They make six figures and the degree should be just as challenging as dental school but with a lower price tag and possibly shorter time frame, and your undergrad degree is perfect. There is some patient interaction but not as intense as being a doctor or nurse.

geraltofrivia

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2017, 10:58:10 AM »
I've heard that a lot of pharmacists are struggling big time right now and my uncle is a pharmacist too. He says that dentistry is better but I don't know. He's in Georgia and I'm in Massachusetts so different areas I guess. I was thinking about applying to some of these highly ranked 1-year accounting programs like Texas A&M since they don't really ask for any prerequisites.

Malum Prohibitum

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2017, 11:00:09 AM »
Out of the three you posted - no contest.  Be a dentist.

geraltofrivia

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2017, 11:02:52 AM »
Even for 460k debt? That number just messes with my head in so many ways. Not doubting you but was just wondering why you would say that.

dandarc

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2017, 11:15:51 AM »
Where did you come up with that number?

Average student debt for dentists seems to be $250K or so, but you can find ways to do it for less.

GizmoTX

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2017, 11:17:05 AM »
You should be (have been) shadowing possible career choices & paths. Talk to many people doing everything you are considering & widen your search. You don't want to spend another 1-4 years plus loans to find yourself in the same position you are in today.

geraltofrivia

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #10 on: July 23, 2017, 11:49:53 AM »
Where did you come up with that number?

Average student debt for dentists seems to be $250K or so, but you can find ways to do it for less.

What you said is true. Unfortunately, I didn't do much volunteering so most of the state schools didn't really bother with my application. My grades and DAT were all high so the private schools like Boston, NYU, and Columbia took interest. Another downside is that private schools on the east coast are pretty expensive. I made the mistake of not applying all over the country. NYU, Columbia, and Boston, etc. are all 400k + easily.

Cassie

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #11 on: July 23, 2017, 11:54:45 AM »
Chiropractors make a ton of $ and I am guessing that the schooling is less $.

hops

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #12 on: July 23, 2017, 12:09:35 PM »
Chiropractors make a ton of $ and I am guessing that the schooling is less $.

What do you consider a ton? Here's the Bureau of Labor Statistics data. (Anecdotally, I know several chiropractors who never earned the kind of money they anticipated and later turned to MLM schemes to supplement their income.)

https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/chiropractors.htm

The outlook is much brighter for dentists, provided they can find markets that aren't on track to become over-saturated:

https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/dentists.htm

OP, have you ever taken a look at the dental sub-forum of Student Doctor Network or the forums at DentalTown.com? They might be able to provide some guidance.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2017, 01:00:50 PM by hops »

cchrissyy

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #13 on: July 23, 2017, 12:43:40 PM »
how about a masters of nursing? you can do that in just 2-3 years, much lower cost, and the salaries and benefits are high, you can do the job anywhere nationwide.  You don't have to be much of a people person, you can be the no-nonsense type who works in ICU or surgery.    Heck, how about certified nurse anestesia?  very high demand, high pay, and no socializing with patients  http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Nurse_Anesthetist_(CRNA)/Salary

mozar

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #14 on: July 23, 2017, 01:10:44 PM »
I can speak to accounting. Yes it is being automated, but there will always be work for CPA's even 20+ years from now (if you want to work that long).
Get this book: https://www.amazon.com/Wiley-CPAexcel-Review-April-Study/dp/1119369916/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1500836411&sr=8-1&keywords=financial+accounting+cpa

It's the financial accounting portion of the CPA. If you feel like you can do the questions you can take some really cheap community college classes to fulfill the the hours requirement (in my state its 150 hours). Take the classes, pass the CPA exam and voila you can get any job anywhere for however many hours you want to work full time or part time or contract. You can choose to work for a the big 4 for a couple years (of murderous hours fame) but it will be over quickly and you'll have something nice to put on your resume.

For personality I don't think it really matters what kind of job you work in but if you are a good problem solver consider computer science.

Cassie

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #15 on: July 23, 2017, 02:44:10 PM »
The chiropractors I know have all owned a one person practice. In 1993 in a town of 50k/people LCOL area he made 100k year.  Here mine makes 300k/year in a population of 450k/people. Of course the general info you posted includes all parts of the country and many that are working for others thus it is dragging the averages down.

La Bibliotecaria Feroz

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #16 on: July 23, 2017, 02:50:58 PM »
Have you considered the option of taking a year off (while working, obv.) so that you can consider a less expensive route to dental school?

geraltofrivia

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #17 on: July 23, 2017, 04:02:00 PM »
Some interesting suggestions I read thus far.

1. I don't think I could ever be a nurse.

2. Chiropractor sounds like a way more economically feasible and lucrative route than this expensive dental school I was accepted into. Just not as certain about the job availability but I guess with determination, it's a job that can be easy to land if I extend my search to a nationwide level

3. Accounting - thanks for that info and I  have always feared automation. If I were to go the tax route and become a CPA (I would 100% become a CPA since I'm a fairly good test-taker and know how to study effectively, even with that 18-month window). I was thinking about applying to Texas' A&M school since it's fairly well known and doesn't require much of a background. I think I prefer tax over audit just because of the lower/non-existent amount of travel. Is tax a safe route for the future if the tax code is simplified?

4. Above this post, thanks for the suggestion of waiting and it was something I was considering as well. With my gpa and DAT I think I could take the year off to volunteer and shadow more to strengthen my application. Many of the state schools I applied to told me that my application was very strong but my volunteer hours were lacking (there were no volunteer hours ha). One even told me to apply again next year. The only thing that worries me is that I would be applying June 2018 when the next cycle opens up (I'll be 25) and matriculate in August 2019 probably (where I'll be 26). And when all is said and done I would be 29. If I go on to this expensive school now I would be 27 by the time I'm finished. In 2 years I wonder if working would make up the price difference. I don't know honestly.

Dee18

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #18 on: July 23, 2017, 04:19:50 PM »
The key for reasonable tuition is usually to go to a state school where you are a legal resident.  Where I live tuition for a state resident is $26,000.  For everyone else it's $60,000.  You could get through with only $150,000 debt, or less.  But that still doesn't resolve the issue of whether you want to be a dentist. 

hops

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #19 on: July 23, 2017, 04:31:37 PM »
The chiropractors I know have all owned a one person practice. In 1993 in a town of 50k/people LCOL area he made 100k year.  Here mine makes 300k/year in a population of 450k/people. Of course the general info you posted includes all parts of the country and many that are working for others thus it is dragging the averages down.

Of course there will be some who earn more than the rest, but I'd caution that it's unrealistic to pursue that field thinking your income will equal or surpass that of the average medical doctor. You will have to work harder and smarter (and in some cases, shadier) to make bigger money in the chiropractic field than in dentistry.

I like frugalparagon's idea and shadowing, as Gizmo mentioned, is extremely important. While diving deeper to determine whether this is the right career for you, I'd also check out forums specific to dentistry and dental school for ideas on minimizing cost and aggressively repaying student loans.

Grogounet

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #20 on: July 23, 2017, 05:00:42 PM »
One of the greatest advice I have received throughout the years:
"money aside (loans and salary), what would you like to do?"

Why? Because it forces ppl to think of what they want to bring to this world and what they are made of/for.

So let me know ask you then...

digitalfusion

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #21 on: July 23, 2017, 05:04:21 PM »
For what it is worth I was in a similar situation with respect to Pa school and Age. I was 25 and wouldn't finish till 27 while my peers I had graduated high school with were already working and living life. It was a lot of pressure. Now I've blown most of them away. So DO NOT let the age thing get you. It is worth it and if you can do it for half the price by waiting a year it's absolutely worth it.
I would not consider chiro unless you are ready to get in the trenches and fight for your life. Jobs when you get out pay very low and your basically like an intern being abused by the owner in most places. Just look up some chiro boards at the suffering. I know a few guys who almost hung it up because the practices almost went under. And all of them complain about insurance--- one of the best reasons to stay dental is no or minimal insurance issues. If you were going to consider chiro I would suggest you look into neurophysiology monitoring in the OR. Pays good and it's a job where your on your own. But very sedentary and looking at a computer for 8 hours straight. It's a niche job that a lot of chiro have gone into, but it's also possible to do it as a non chiro by going into short programs and on the job training to do it. Worth looking into if chillin is more your thing.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2017, 05:08:53 PM by digitalfusion »

digitalfusion

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #22 on: July 23, 2017, 05:12:21 PM »
One of the greatest advice I have received throughout the years:
"money aside (loans and salary), what would you like to do?"

Why? Because it forces ppl to think of what they want to bring to this world and what they are made of/for.

So let me know ask you then...

I also agree with this. Right now I have a job I really don't like but it pays well and after 6 years I don't think I can take it anymore. ( I also have an open post discussing this in this section) so I think it is very important to do what you like and are interested in as well. Also look at the work environment you will be in and if it suits your personality. CPA might be good but again you may have bosses or supervisors that you rub shoulders with and if your not able to handle confrontation it might be best to look for a job that you like where you are more of your own boss.

cchrissyy

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #23 on: July 23, 2017, 05:28:15 PM »
I'm in a HCOL area (san fransisco) and I have real knowledge of chiropractor's office finances. Not just talk but seen actual financial records with my own eyes. It is VERY LOW pay, as in "the receptionist makes as much as the doctor does". I wouldn't recommend anybody spend a day in professional school that paid off so little.

bugbaby

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #24 on: July 23, 2017, 10:42:07 PM »
Between Chiro and Dentist, definitely dentist. And if you're as smart and driven as you say, you'll go where the bucks are and will do just fine.

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Jaayse

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #25 on: July 23, 2017, 11:04:49 PM »
Just an observation from an average person who has gone to the dentist, if you're worried about talking to the patients, I think the hygienist is the one who does most of the socializing. 

Every time I have been the dentist himself only came in at the end to go over the paperwork and give me the end results of either, your teeth look great see you again in a year or you have a cavity, we will schedule you an appointment at the front desk.  When I would go in for a cavity, I was mostly sitting there with his hand in my mouth... really hard to talk to him then.  I wouldn't give up on it for this reason alone, but it sounds like you're more worried about the debt.  If that is the case, run the simulation of you going to the school, and working at 27 vs you waiting for a state school and working at 29 using average salaries in urban areas.  If your fear is more that dentistry isn't your calling, then some more introspection is needed and keep in mind that many people don't know what they want to do for work (including me), but we all just keep on moving forward.

dess1313

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #26 on: July 24, 2017, 01:30:30 AM »
Some interesting suggestions I read thus far.

1. I don't think I could ever be a nurse.

2. Chiropractor sounds like a way more economically feasible and lucrative route than this expensive dental school I was accepted into. Just not as certain about the job availability but I guess with determination, it's a job that can be easy to land if I extend my search to a nationwide level

3. Accounting - thanks for that info and I  have always feared automation. If I were to go the tax route and become a CPA (I would 100% become a CPA since I'm a fairly good test-taker and know how to study effectively, even with that 18-month window). I was thinking about applying to Texas' A&M school since it's fairly well known and doesn't require much of a background. I think I prefer tax over audit just because of the lower/non-existent amount of travel. Is tax a safe route for the future if the tax code is simplified?

4. Above this post, thanks for the suggestion of waiting and it was something I was considering as well. With my gpa and DAT I think I could take the year off to volunteer and shadow more to strengthen my application. Many of the state schools I applied to told me that my application was very strong but my volunteer hours were lacking (there were no volunteer hours ha). One even told me to apply again next year. The only thing that worries me is that I would be applying June 2018 when the next cycle opens up (I'll be 25) and matriculate in August 2019 probably (where I'll be 26). And when all is said and done I would be 29. If I go on to this expensive school now I would be 27 by the time I'm finished. In 2 years I wonder if working would make up the price difference. I don't know honestly.


I agree with waiting a year if you are unsure and have good grades/tests.  Go job shadow at a local dental office, and accounting office.  Apply to in state, and local lower cost schools.  see if any locally have waiting lists that would be available if people backed out letting you in earlier than waiting till next year.  Most dentists that make the big $$$ run their own office, so are you prepared/have the temperament to manage staff, and run a business like that?  Jumping in to deep water of $400k unsure of your career choice is not a great place to be.

Also, something i heard, and can vouch for is a saying i hard while actually at a dental office as a person was job shadowing.  It was from the head dentist himself  "You can either save lives, or have a life."  I'm in the 24/7 medical field in a job similar to nursing, and i save lives.  I work weekends, holidays, nights, etc etc etc.  Jobs like CPA, and dental are jobs where you can have a life.  Most of its monday to friday.  Occasional weekends depending on how high ranking you are, and the season.  but you get to better dictate hours and have office hours.  you get to have a life.  Is something like that very important to you?

tsmith321

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #27 on: July 24, 2017, 12:07:56 PM »
So i have an interesting take on this:

My wife is a dentist and i am a teacher.  My first question is why didn't you or can't you apply to a state dental school.  My wife went to a NY state dental school and came out of school owing 180k.  That is not terrible compared to other schools.  Once you graduate, you will have the option of completing a residency, working for another dentist, or joining/starting your own private practice.  There is also the option of joining the military, and have them pay for school for years of service.

My wife opted to join a practice as an associate dentist, and became a partner 3 years later.  This has worked out great for our family.  I would highly suggest becoming or at least have an option of owning a business.  I will tell you that you MUST be dedicated to the art of dentistry if you truly want a career in this field.  It is not something to pursue if you are unsure about your goals.  You are going to have to dedicate at least 4 years to nothing but studying, but in the end it pays off.

Now in terms of teaching; teaching is a calling.  You do not going into teaching for the money, nor will you make a lot of money.  There are obvious perks, like summers off, school holidays etc.  Be careful of the school districts.  Being in a school with a difficult administration, can cause someone to pursue other fields.

 I would really think hard about your decisions, you are definitely at a crossroads.  I view dental school as a long term investment that will pay serious financial dividends. Teaching while rewarding, can really burn you out.  (Depending on age you teach, subject, administration)

To put it this way, to see the career paths my wife and i took, and how they have gone; If I was smart enough, I would much rather be in her situation.  She earns a great salary, works 4 days a week, is her own boss, and loves what she does. 

Last thing:  We were able to pay off her dental school loans and my masters degree (private university) in 7 years.  So it doesn't take that long...

Hope this rant helps you!

startingsmall

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #28 on: July 24, 2017, 01:01:22 PM »
I absolutely would not take on $430k in debt for a dental career that you don't seem very interested in. Take a year off, spend some time at a dental office (shadowing or working) and reapply to cheaper schools while deciding if that's really something you want to do.

Mgmny

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #29 on: July 24, 2017, 01:11:56 PM »
I saw you throw around columbia dental a few times earlier. Is that the school you were accepted into? If that's the case, don't liek 95% of their graduates go into a specialty? So, you really won't be done training in 4 years.... If it's one ofthe other schools, i have no experience with them.

Cassie

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #30 on: July 24, 2017, 01:31:46 PM »
When I was in grad school in 1992 dentists had the highest suicide rate. The reason was that most wanted to be doctors but could not get into med school so dentistry was a 2nd choice. Then after a number of years they were bored to death being really tooth carpenters. 

iris lily

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #31 on: July 24, 2017, 02:04:12 PM »
Chiropractors make a ton of $ and I am guessing that the schooling is less $.
no, they dont as a whole. Some might make bank,  ut the ones I know are out there hawking multi level marketing schemes.

Pharmacy was for decades a ticket to a $100,000 job,  but no longer. Our friend who teaches at a pharmacy school says all of the grads no longer have jobs before they get oit  of school. That market has cooled.

« Last Edit: July 24, 2017, 02:07:06 PM by iris lily »

Larsg

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #32 on: July 24, 2017, 03:45:30 PM »
I think that Dentists can potentially become health care rockstars of the future now that people are finally beginning to pay attention to how much dental care and health matter to ones overall health - e.g. internal infection leading to inflammation, heard disease, etc. The Dentists are also changing, being far more client focused, offering pain free services that target those who fear the dentist and can make a real impact on this populations health - especially an aging population. I love my Dentist - he is excellent at what he does, offers an array of services that are basically pain and hassle free. His staff does most of the interaction with the patience and I only talk with the dentist in depth when we have to come up with a plan - I'm in my 50's now so you have the do clean up work for old fillings, determine if any cosmetic work desired, deal with aging  bite issues, etc. Then his staff manages all of the "softer" relationship stuff and he hires very well so it's a shock to say but I enjoy going to this office. That said, If the people working there were not passionate about what they do, I would not want them over the chair putting tools in my mouth of any kind. So aside form the debt, make sure you understand that this an area where you can have a real impact on the the heart of people and their long term attitudes about taking care of their teeth.

There will be hassles with healthcare and reimbursement processes although I have seen some of the high end dentists get around she be accepting no insurance, taking all payments upfront or using a lender service but they have best in class claims processing services so they will process a claim for you with your insurance, work to maximize your reimbursement and have the check sent directly to you. One savvy Dentist here is Seattle has been successful in getting reimbursement checks out to you within a couple weeks, amazing - Dr Brian McKay for those of you in Seattle. he is downtown. look him up online. He has  great blog and has an outstanding team to work with - http://www.acld.com. They treat patience very well and their costs are surprising reasonable. If I were to become a Dentist, I would follow this model so pls check it out.

As to all of the other things you mentioned, they seem pretty tedious and if you are an Analytical Introvert and do not want to take on being a dentist, I challenge you to think bigger. Think AI - Artificial Intelligence/Robotics, etc. Plenty of opportunity to apply in Healthcare and every other function so I would be checking in advanced education here and all of the possibilities. You are still very young so Try to combine your personality, with some passion in an area that is highly paid that will be relevant for years to come. This seems like a space where you could make some big bucks during your earning years, drop in an out as an independent consultant/contractor, and retire young!

Best of Luck!

Cassie

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #33 on: July 24, 2017, 05:29:48 PM »
i wonder if some areas are just saturated with chiropractors so it would depend on if you are willing to move. I have lived in 6 different states with towns varying from big to small. Because I was a career counselor I always ask people I meet about their jobs including pay. The online resources for each state or even the US as a whole can be very misleading. The most successful ones I have seen have a small one person besides the chiropractor. They give people a good discount that pay cash and don't use their insurance. They also don't pad the bill so they don't bill for an office visit.  They just bill for what they do such as an adjustment. The chiro mills that bill for everything under the sun and try to put you on a treatment plan are ripoffs. A good chiro will say you know when you need to come so just call. When you find someone good you stay loyal and tell others about it.  These  are the types of offices that are making bank. Also their malpractice is low because it is really hard to injure someone unless you are a complete moron.

geraltofrivia

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #34 on: July 24, 2017, 06:47:50 PM »
@digitalfusion - You're probably right in saying that the wait is probably worth it. I would still be young at 29. At this point I think waiting an year and exploring my options and strengthening my dental application with more volunteer hours will get me into a cheaper school if I still think dental is the right route for me.

@babybug - I'm book smart but I often doubt myself and screw myself over

@dess1313 - Yeah I'm definitely a bit materialistic and my leisure time is definitely important to me. But I'm also willing to work hard for that leisure time. I was thinking of just working for someone as a dentist. Not too keen with the prospects of owning a business and the obligations that come with it.

@tsmith321 - I actually did apply to my state schools and I even spoke to them on the phone regarding my rejection. They said my grades were all exceptional blah blah but that my volunteering was lacking (because I had none hehe). I'm too much of a coward to join the military unfortunately. And the transitioning to a partner route sounds like the safest bet. I'd be willing to take a reduced salary to make that work if need be. And on teaching, it's probably what I enjoy the most but I also have an ego that keeps telling me to do something more acclaimed in society's view (as pathetic as that sounds).  And your rant was VERY helpful. Nice to hear from someone who's been through the hell of student loans and powered through it. Good luck to you and your wife.

@Cassie - Ha I couldn't care less about not being considered a doctor. Seems like an extremely stupid thing to commit suicide over. If I was a dentist, I would 100% consider myself a doctor because that's what I would be.


iris lily

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #35 on: July 24, 2017, 09:30:47 PM »
i wonder if some areas are just saturated with chiropractors so it would depend on if you are willing to move. I have lived in 6 different states with towns varying from big to small. Because I was a career counselor I always ask people I meet about their jobs including pay. The online resources for each state or even the US as a whole can be very misleading. The most successful ones I have seen have a small one person besides the chiropractor. They give people a good discount that pay cash and don't use their insurance. They also don't pad the bill so they don't bill for an office visit.  They just bill for what they do such as an adjustment. The chiro mills that bill for everything under the sun and try to put you on a treatment plan are ripoffs. A good chiro will say you know when you need to come so just call. When you find someone good you stay loyal and tell others about it.  These  are the types of offices that are making bank. Also their malpractice is low because it is really hard to injure someone unless you are a complete moron.

We've had long discussions here about chiros, and some find them trustworthy. I dont, their trwining is suspect, and wouldn't visit them. I do understand that in some instances they can do some good, but I would rather go to other allied health practitioners. But all of that said, sure, some are making money. dH's cousin from Switzerland is one of those mega millionaire chiros who teaches other chiros  about add on services. He got his dr. Degree here in the States, made his millions, and "retired" back in Switzerland,  but he still runs a few of the seminars to make chiros rich.

Civex

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #36 on: July 25, 2017, 09:07:11 PM »
Can you waitlist your seat at the private school for next year and spend the next year strengthening your application/reapplying to state schools? I would guess if you were accepted into your state school, you would graduate with half the debt, and dentistry is a pretty stable career choice. From what I've seen, most solid students are successful on their second application to a state school.

For volunteering, maybe check into local high schools about tutoring high schools students in STEM subjects-it sounds like you already are an accomplished tutor, have a solid background in science, and this would provide you with the needed volunteering experience.

I didn't do the math, but I would expect the opportunity cost of one years wages vs 2x the school debt for likely the same earning potential would largely be in favor of taking an extra year.

slappy

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Re: Turning down dental school to pursue another career?
« Reply #37 on: July 26, 2017, 06:07:34 AM »
If you feel your personality can be aggressive, do not consider chiropractic. I've gone to chiropractors my whole life, and their personality is very important. The good ones treat patients like family. My current chiro gives me a hug after every visit. I think it's kind of strange, but whatever. I like him and I like going there.  My previous chiro was similar but I left because of the aforementioned MLM hawking. Also my previous chiropractor only worked four days per week. Good for her for making her own schedule, but it didn't work for me.