Author Topic: Best careers!(?)  (Read 9767 times)

resy

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Best careers!(?)
« on: September 04, 2014, 05:17:13 PM »
I want to hear about your careers, specifically if they make (or potential) 50k or more per year.
Odd question, I know but I'm at a crossroads in my life. Late 20's and after 9 years of being a single parent and having  basic survival be my priority, I am finally at a point in my life where I have the option to go to school and get a carrer.

THINGS TO CONSIDER:

-Turning 29 in a few months so idk if it will be more difficult to start a career now (?)
-Needs to be balanced, cant sacrice the time away from my kid studing/learning, tuition costs, etc just to come out making say $15 an hourly
-I'm smart, quick learning, super responsible, auto motivated, great people skills so I feel I can do just about anything! Although I shy away from complex math (not that ots particularly hard, i just get anxious thinking of say the world coming to an end because I did the damn math wrong and now I'm being sued by everyone and their grandmas plus the whole "i ended the world" thing on my conscious). I do like budgets, personal finance type of math though!
-Love helping people (hippie at heart). Ultimate goal of FI is to dedicate my life to helping super poor people, (kids and elders specially) so something that ties into that would be a bonus

Suggestions?!

Bikesy

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2014, 05:35:22 PM »
I'm about your age and have a business management degree.  Like you I have great people skills.  I started my career as an assistant manager at a major retailer making around 50k.  I worked there for 4 years and when I quit I was making 65k.  Lots of interaction with people, both employees and customers.  I really enjoyed it for the first 3.5 years!

Best of luck!

zataks

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2014, 05:42:56 PM »
Water plant operator reporting in!  It takes a little studying and very low up front costs to pass state exams (~$100/exam) to get to a level where anyone will hire you.  Once you have the basic exams, you can start getting experience operating drinking water treatment plants or distribution systems (think municipal water pipes or municipal filtration facilities). 

In many areas the job pays decently; I lived in an area where COL as almost pegged to the national average and with basic certifications and no experience was making $12/hour.  After a cumulative 28months experience (some of it was seasonal) I changed employers and started the new job at over $14/hour.  By passing exams and working hard after 5 years I was making over $19/hour ($50k/years with OT) then I applied to a job in a higher COL area but the pay more than scaled with COL so now base is about $40/hour ($100k+/year with OT).  Plus government benefits. 

The same goes for waste water operations, plant mechanics, instrument technicians.  I highly recommend the field because it's decent, important work (without people like me, you don't have tap water or flushable toilets) and pay and benefits are good.

lakemom

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2014, 05:45:23 PM »
Possibly no additional education needed:  start an eldercare business.  Either an elder daycare center OR an inhome service.  Skills needed:  loads of compassion, ability to screen and hire others with the same, business skills (ie, cashflow, bookkeeping, hiring/firing, etc.).  An industry that is expected to grow by leaps and bounds over the next 20 years as the boomers age beyond the 'active retirement' years.

Rein1987

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2014, 05:57:42 PM »

-Turning 29 in a few months so idk if it will be more difficult to start a career now (?)


My husband went back to graduate school at the age of 28 and spent all his savings for the tuition. It's not late at all. Right after his graduate school, his income doubled.

t-rymz

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2014, 06:11:01 PM »
Can you program? Maybe learn Ruby on Rails or Django and make some nice money coding. You don't even need a degree for a lot of it.

If you get a degree, I vote for engineering. Awesome careers there. (I'm in chemical engineering)

Workinghard

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2014, 06:14:18 PM »
Nursing

YoungInvestor

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2014, 06:19:27 PM »
Couple things we would need to know:

1) Anything you particularly enjoy?
2) Do you already have any qualifications that could help you get something?
3) What have you been doing up to now? Being a parent, no matter how involved it might be, is not something you put on a resume.

Psychstache

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2014, 06:23:37 PM »
Sounds like someone needs to look into being a school psychologist

http://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/school-psychologist

Great job, kid hours friendly, public service, lots of job opportunities, 5th grade level math ceiling. It has it all!

resy

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #9 on: September 04, 2014, 06:34:29 PM »
Couple things we would need to know:

1) Anything you particularly enjoy?
2) Do you already have any qualifications that could help you get something?
3) What have you been doing up to now? Being a parent, no matter how involved it might be, is not something you put on a resume.

Hey! So...

1) I enjoy lots of things (which is actually a problem for this scenario as it makes it hard to narrow down stuff) I enjoy leatning about science (anatomy and cellular is really cool), personal finance, i like to make things with my hands and am not afraid of hard work, I'm very into introspective stuff/thinking too (psychology)....i could go on.
2) Bilingual (spanish/english) fluently on both ends.
3) I have had a small (think me and 2 helpers on average) high end house cleaning business. I am really really good at it and when I was super motivated I did amost get to 50k but after so long I've lost interest and my body is getting tired and achy. I dont wish to own a cleaning company and purely manage,nuh uh.

scottish

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #10 on: September 04, 2014, 08:07:22 PM »
Electrical engineer here.      If you like designing and building things, there's always lots of work.    Salaries go way over $50K with experience and the benefits are pretty solid.   

There are lots of opportunities to start your own company if you're so inclined.      And you generally get to work with people even when you're at entry level (despite the common perception that engineers are technocratic nerds who like their computers more than their colleagues).

The only real downside is you have to watch out for Dilbert-like workplaces.

Bill

mozar

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #11 on: September 04, 2014, 08:32:34 PM »
accounting/ bookkeeping is a solid choice. multiplication is as complicated as it gets. though if you want to get a cpa you need some low level algebra. not so great if you need to be social though, but is super 9-5 hours. If you have great people skills sales could work.

NathanDrake

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #12 on: September 04, 2014, 09:43:25 PM »
Electrical engineer here.      If you like designing and building things, there's always lots of work.    Salaries go way over $50K with experience and the benefits are pretty solid.   

There are lots of opportunities to start your own company if you're so inclined.      And you generally get to work with people even when you're at entry level (despite the common perception that engineers are technocratic nerds who like their computers more than their colleagues).

The only real downside is you have to watch out for Dilbert-like workplaces.

Bill

EE here too -- just curious what area you are in? Looking to maybe switch jobs, but EE is so broad that I'm not sure where I should start looking or if I should stay within my industry (Aerospace).

resy

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #13 on: September 04, 2014, 10:56:57 PM »
Water plant operator reporting in!  It takes a little studying and very low up front costs to pass state exams (~$100/exam) to get to a level where anyone will hire you.  Once you have the basic exams, you can start getting experience operating drinking water treatment plants or distribution systems (think municipal water pipes or municipal filtration facilities). 

In many areas the job pays decently; I lived in an area where COL as almost pegged to the national average and with basic certifications and no experience was making $12/hour.  After a cumulative 28months experience (some of it was seasonal) I changed employers and started the new job at over $14/hour.  By passing exams and working hard after 5 years I was making over $19/hour ($50k/years with OT) then I applied to a job in a higher COL area but the pay more than scaled with COL so now base is about $40/hour ($100k+/year with OT).  Plus government benefits. 

The same goes for waste water operations, plant mechanics, instrument technicians.  I highly recommend the field because it's decent, important work (without people like me, you don't have tap water or flushable toilets) and pay and benefits are good.

Whatvare the qualifications to get into a field like this?

MBot

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #14 on: September 04, 2014, 10:58:58 PM »
I'd watch what salaries are like in your area and what certifications they require, but in Canada ultrasound technologists are university-educated and start at a good salary. I am a cardiac one.

People all day, but you also complete a definite task, some physics/math, constant learning/upgrading but you do the same test every day. If you like variety can get into doing different subspecialties. Edit: you mentioned anatomy and you do get to see cool anatomy and think big-picture about how things work together in the body.

 General ultrasound from a 4-year program or cardiac ultrasound techs from a graduate program start at an easy $28-30 an hour. Salary maxes out at about $40/hour but if you go clinic/faster you can make more. Possibility for eventual management in some hospitals.

Caveat - May just be a shorter program or more poorly paid where you are. In the States some is similar/better but some are lousy areas and pay $18/hour.

One gig they paid my travel and hotel - I made $32/echo and booked every half hour. $64/hour. Now I work for $30/hour but I can walk to work, do one every 45 minutes, and have much less stress on my body.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2014, 11:01:14 PM by MBot »

resy

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #15 on: September 04, 2014, 10:59:49 PM »
I'm about your age and have a business management degree.  Like you I have great people skills.  I started my career as an assistant manager at a major retailer making around 50k.  I worked there for 4 years and when I quit I was making 65k.  Lots of interaction with people, both employees and customers.  I really enjoyed it for the first 3.5 years!

Best of luck!

First 3.5 years huh? What happened after? Have you switched/moved up? I often hear negative things about getting a business degree because "too many ppm are getting them" (or so they say) what is your opinion? Do you have a ton of competition and the like?

resy

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #16 on: September 04, 2014, 11:03:37 PM »
I'd watch what salaries are like in your area and what certifications they require, but in Canada ultrasound technologists are university-educated and start at a good salary. I am a cardiac one.

People all day, but you also complete a definite task, some physics/math, constant learning/upgrading but you do the same test every day. If you like variety can get into doing different subspecialties. Edit: you mentioned anatomy and you do get to see cool anatomy and think big-picture about how things work together in the body.

 General ultrasound from a 4-year program or cardiac ultrasound techs from a graduate program start at an easy $28-30 an hour. Salary maxes out at about $40/hour but if you go clinic/faster you can make more. Possibility for eventual management in some hospitals.

Caveat - May just be a shorter program or more poorly paid where you are. In the States some is similar/better but some are lousy areas and pay $18/hour.

One gig they paid my travel and hotel - I made $32/echo and booked every half hour. $64/hour. Now I work for $30/hour but I can walk to work, do one every 45 minutes, and have much less stress on my body.

I've heard medical tech stuff is really booming (ultrasound, mri, etc), what is the general work environment for you?

MBot

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #17 on: September 04, 2014, 11:13:05 PM »
MRI is more training but starts at $40/hour here. Lots of opportunity. And great pay. 

Tons of jobs in most fields. General ultrasound techs are being hired full-time out of the gate most places.  Cardiac is usually PT to start with FT after a couple years working multiple places.

I LOVE what I do. Cardiac ultrasound is awesome. If it was my only degree I would have gone general tho.

Here we have gov sites like Ontario Job Futures that show data for job distribution, salary, projected growth or decline etc. do you have access to the same?

resy

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #18 on: September 05, 2014, 10:08:36 AM »
MRI is more training but starts at $40/hour here. Lots of opportunity. And great pay. 

Tons of jobs in most fields. General ultrasound techs are being hired full-time out of the gate most places.  Cardiac is usually PT to start with FT after a couple years working multiple places.

I LOVE what I do. Cardiac ultrasound is awesome. If it was my only degree I would have gone general tho.

Here we have gov sites like Ontario Job Futures that show data for job distribution, salary, projected growth or decline etc. do you have access to the same?

Yes, I do! And in addition I also have access to a database with tons of this info through my community college. The only thing lacking is the more intimate, unbiased outlook of what certain careers are really like. Honestly, lots of things look good on paper, not so much in real life...

SailAway

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #19 on: September 05, 2014, 10:36:24 AM »
Are you in good shape? I'm a paramedic and DH is a firefighter/EMT. We each make about 55k with experience. Good benefits including pensions.

Medic requires 18-24 months of part-time school. FF is all on-the-job training although it's harder to get the job initially.

If you enjoy helping people and deal with stress well it may be something to look into. Depends on how the job market is in your area.

diymark

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #20 on: September 05, 2014, 11:52:04 AM »
As I come to a close on a 30+ year career in engineering (software) I have an alternative perspective that might surprise some people. I would not recommend going into a technology field like I did. You'll always have to spend time in school to keep your skills up to date and there will always be a new graduate coming into the field with current skills at a cheaper salary. I think several posters sent the right message....service jobs. It can't be outsourced and they're typically are very stable. It could be a caregiver, construction worker, retail sales, or supporting infrastructure (i.e. residential plumber). Any job that can be accomplished over a wire, will be. That means your tax accountant, financial adviser, computer programmer, even a doctor (it is happening already..there is an app for that). It's going to be tough for the next gen. I don't admire those of you who are just starting.

resy

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #21 on: September 05, 2014, 01:05:47 PM »
As I come to a close on a 30+ year career in engineering (software) I have an alternative perspective that might surprise some people. I would not recommend going into a technology field like I did. You'll always have to spend time in school to keep your skills up to date and there will always be a new graduate coming into the field with current skills at a cheaper salary. I think several posters sent the right message....service jobs. It can't be outsourced and they're typically are very stable. It could be a caregiver, construction worker, retail sales, or supporting infrastructure (i.e. residential plumber). Any job that can be accomplished over a wire, will be. That means your tax accountant, financial adviser, computer programmer, even a doctor (it is happening already..there is an app for that). It's going to be tough for the next gen. I don't admire those of you who are just starting.

Wow, that is really interesting perspective specially since I am coming from a service infustry (self employed house cleaner). There are many things I enjoy about my work but it is physically draining and the income is pretty capped....

Krum312

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #22 on: September 05, 2014, 01:53:59 PM »
I recently turned 30 and started a program at a local community college for a radiologic technologist, or x-ray tech. I enjoy the service industry, working with and helping people. The community college program has a great reputation and does not cost an arm and a leg. Only six weeks into the first semester, I will start clinicals and get hands on hospital experience. The program will give me that education as well as the experience to succeed in a career as a radiologic technologist. The field has a high growth rate and there are many opportunities for growth and development. With certification in radiology, I can increase my opportunities with education and certifications with CT, MRI, sonography, radiation therapy, or nuclear medicine. Income can be dependent on the cost of living in your area. I would look into the area community colleges. The field is in high demand so the programs can be be very competitive. Some programs recommend or even require job shadow experience. Enjoy your search.
"Do what you love and the money will follow"

Gone Fishing

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #23 on: September 05, 2014, 02:19:41 PM »
Have you explored bi-lingual opportunities?  Your community might be covered up in bi-lingual qualified people, but I can assure you everywhere is not.  If that is the case, a move to a different area may present several opportunities, many of which may carry a premium for the skill. 

TheNorwegianGuy

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #24 on: September 05, 2014, 03:22:44 PM »
If I had wanted to go for FIRE and if I had known that early in my life I would have done what a buddy of mine did. With no education he got himself a job working on a offshore platform, just washing and working in the cantine. He works 2 weeks on and then have 4 weeks of and earns over $100 000 a year. The two weeks he is on food and everything is paid for. The four weeks he is of, he works and earns money on his passion of making music. If he really wanted to he could become FIRE in a very young age, without having any student dept or having wasted five years in university.

darkadams00

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #25 on: September 05, 2014, 03:40:12 PM »
Data scientist--I spend most of my days working with medium-sized data (15-50M rows), performing mathematical analysis on insurance claim, bank account/wire transfer, and tax return data, depending on the client's industry. My work helps clients identify fraudsters. This saves the client a lot of money (think tens of millions of $) and penalizes bad guys.

The prerequisites are good math and programming skills as well as good project management and communication skills. The work is about 70% behind a computer screen, about 20% in internal meetings, and 10% in client-facing meetings. A master's degree is required. Most of the folks of my floor (~90 people) have multiple graduate degrees. Salary is definitely commensurate with the level of education and expertise required.


Bikesy

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #26 on: September 05, 2014, 05:50:41 PM »
I'm about your age and have a business management degree.  Like you I have great people skills.  I started my career as an assistant manager at a major retailer making around 50k.  I worked there for 4 years and when I quit I was making 65k.  Lots of interaction with people, both employees and customers.  I really enjoyed it for the first 3.5 years!

Best of luck!

First 3.5 years huh? What happened after? Have you switched/moved up? I often hear negative things about getting a business degree because "too many ppm are getting them" (or so they say) what is your opinion? Do you have a ton of competition and the like?

The company I worked for has had some struggles the past year or so.  They started asking for too much with too little resources.  I always told myself I would do it as long as I enjoyed it.  At the point I stopped enjoying it I left.  I got a new job as an operations manager for a major company.  I now make around 100k per year.  As for the business degree, it's good enough to get you the interview.  The one thing I didn't like was that I didn't have a clear career path after school.  One of my roommates was an accounting major and knew exactly what to do and where to go after we graduated.  I definitely envied him in that regard.  If you truly have great people skills learn how to ace interviews and you will get most any job you want.  I'm smart but not the smartest; however, I can interview like a champ, and that has served me well.  My best skills are not teachable, they must be bought.  That's why competition doesn't usually bother me.  Employers can teach someone technical skills, they can't teach someone how to be a leader.

resy

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #27 on: September 05, 2014, 06:27:42 PM »
I'm about your age and have a business management degree.  Like you I have great people skills.  I started my career as an assistant manager at a major retailer making around 50k.  I worked there for 4 years and when I quit I was making 65k.  Lots of interaction with people, both employees and customers.  I really enjoyed it for the first 3.5 years!

Best of luck!

First 3.5 years huh? What happened after? Have you switched/moved up? I often hear negative things about getting a business degree because "too many ppm are getting them" (or so they say) what is your opinion? Do you have a ton of competition and the like?

The company I worked for has had some struggles the past year or so.  They started asking for too much with too little resources.  I always told myself I would do it as long as I enjoyed it.  At the point I stopped enjoying it I left.  I got a new job as an operations manager for a major company.  I now make around 100k per year.  As for the business degree, it's good enough to get you the interview.  The one thing I didn't like was that I didn't have a clear career path after school.  One of my roommates was an accounting major and knew exactly what to do and where to go after we graduated.  I definitely envied him in that regard.  If you truly have great people skills learn how to ace interviews and you will get most any job you want.  I'm smart but not the smartest; however, I can interview like a champ, and that has served me well.  My best skills are not teachable, they must be bought.  That's why competition doesn't usually bother me.  Employers can teach someone technical skills, they can't teach someone how to be a leader.

That makes sense to me. As a house cleaner, although its often looked down on, i have learned MANY things in the past 10 years that I wonder how my now husband(newlywed) doesnt know with an operations management degree. I know how to mutli task like there's no tomorrow, bargain and assert myself with clients while maintaining myself likeable, i learned ways to manage people and other skills that as you say, cant be bought.

mozar

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #28 on: September 05, 2014, 08:49:02 PM »
As an accountant, I am basically biding my time until technology takes over, but I think one starting now would have another solid 5-10 years before it's all automated and by then you would be an accounting superstar and either you will be in demand because you have experience or if you have to retrain, companies will see your technical training as a good background.

resy

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #29 on: September 05, 2014, 09:42:10 PM »
As an accountant, I am basically biding my time until technology takes over, but I think one starting now would have another solid 5-10 years before it's all automated and by then you would be an accounting superstar and either you will be in demand because you have experience or if you have to retrain, companies will see your technical training as a good background.

How outsourced do you seriously think accounting might become in the following decade? Do you already see signs of it? Accounting is def something i have seriously considered

scottish

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #30 on: September 06, 2014, 07:13:06 AM »


EE here too -- just curious what area you are in? Looking to maybe switch jobs, but EE is so broad that I'm not sure where I should start looking or if I should stay within my industry (Aerospace).

I started in defense contracting - not unlike aerospace - back in the 80's but I switched to telecoms in time for the ".com" boom.

Dibbels81

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #31 on: September 06, 2014, 07:23:16 AM »
Check out Physical Therapy assistant.  It only requires a two year associates degree, and depending on location, can pay 50k plus.  Your Spanish background will be your meal ticket into the field, as that's in huge demand right now with the booming Latino community.  Here's a salary map:

http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes312021.htm

mozar

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #32 on: September 07, 2014, 09:57:33 AM »
The number of accounting positions is supposed to grow over the next decade. But it depends on what you are doing. There are different professions with hierarchies of jobs.
Operations: 1. Bookkeeping 2. Accounts Payable and Accounts Receivable jobs 3. Tax accountants 4. People who can do both AR, AP 5. Financial Reporting 6. Supervisors 7. Managers 8. CFO
Audit: First year, Second year, Supervisors, Managers, Partners
Tax: First year, Second year, Supervisors, Managers, Partners
Jobs that are currently being automated: AP/AR, some book keeping, basic tax accounting (like Turbo Tax).
Like manufacturing the repetitive tasks are being automated first. Then it will start moving up. All the other jobs will be around for awhile but increasingly the jobs will go to people who have trained to assist the software. For example in the AP dept at my job, it's all automated but they still need someone to check on the automation, make sure it worked, and do detailed analysis if a transaction didn't process correctly. And then an auditor comes to check on the software and the person who runs the software.
I hope that makes sense.

Albert

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #33 on: September 07, 2014, 10:33:12 AM »
External audit will always be around, it's required by law for public companies, and it will be done by humans not some smart program. I have a friend who used to do it for one of the big four accounting firms. A lot of money but also insane hours and stress. It's a good thing to write in your CV, but few people last longer than 5-6 years there.

I'm a chemist myself working in R&D. I wouldn't suggest that route to students unless they are really good at it. Competition is large and the number of jobs available is slowly going down in Europe at least. Some of it due to automation, but mostly because of outsourcing to China/India.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2014, 10:36:30 AM by Albert »

resy

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #34 on: September 07, 2014, 11:39:15 AM »
Such a bummer that our economy and politics are at a place where young, aspiring professional-to-be have to consider outsourcing so much.

mozar

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Re: Best careers!(?)
« Reply #35 on: September 07, 2014, 02:19:01 PM »
The economy is always changing, so you have to keep training. So far new and different jobs keep getting created as old ones get automated/outsourced.
To become an external auditor you need 150 college credits in order to be hired. But operations is easier to get into. I think in about 15 years external audit will be automated, and assisted by a person. Once everything else is automated, it will just be software checking software.