Author Topic: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation  (Read 17205 times)

CCCA

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 625
  • Location: Bay Area, California
  • born before the 80's
    • FI programming
Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« on: August 29, 2018, 12:27:42 AM »
We scored a 3 night stay at a resort in Sedona, AZ for $50 ($150 upfront - $100 visa card when we attend the presentation) in a few weeks.  I know it's no obligation to purchase and there is literally no way in hell we'd ever agree to purchase a timeshare, but people keep warning us about high pressure sales tactics and the presentations dragging on way too long. 


So with that in mind,
1) who's done one of these timeshare presentations?
2) what has your experience been?
3) what are your best tips to keep the presentation moving along and getting out of there with a minimum of pain?
4) what are some good and effective lines for indicating your utter lack of interest?

Edited to add: it's with Diamond Resorts International, if anyone has particular experience with that company.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2018, 10:51:45 AM by CCCA »

boarder42

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8095
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2018, 04:37:38 AM »
For me it's always easy to say no I do these all the time. There is a required amount of time you are giving up when you decide to do these usually 90 minutes. So watch the time and at the end of 90 mins. Request to leave and receive your gift card bc you're not interested.  I've done diamond before. It wasn't that bad the lady tried to make us feel like crap for wasting her time when we said times up. But other than that I enjoy them. Best one I ever did was Marriott. It was on our honeymoon told the rep that when we walked in and she said are you going to buy today we said no. So she said I've got to act like I'm selling you so let's go to my office and I'll give you some local tips for the area then we'll tour a room and you can leave.

Dave1442397

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1307
  • Location: NJ
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2018, 05:21:10 AM »
We've stayed at two Marriott resorts for $150 per stay. One in Orlando for four nights, and one in Myrtle Beach for five nights.

The Orlando sales guy asked up front if we were interested in buying. We said no, and we were out of there in fifteen minutes.

The Myrtle Beach guy had us sit through the presentation, which was maybe a half hour, and then told me I had a good poker face, because he'd seen no reaction throughout the spiel. No pressure there either - we just said we weren't interested and left.


simonsez

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1049
  • Age: 35
  • Location: Midwest
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2018, 09:25:13 AM »
I think the biggest mistake that someone who has no intention of buying anything is they are too nice.

I've only done two but each time it was a 1 on 1 (well 1 on 2 if you count DW and me) rather than a group presentation.  In fact, I wouldn't even call it a presentation but more so a guided tour of the grounds and a specific unit.  The salesperson will be happy to show you this and that over the course of up to several hours because their training tells them the longer they have you on the line - the better their odds of a sale.  But if you take up more of their time and ultimately waste theirs, that's not ideal.  I was too nice my first go around and felt bad after it dawned on me that the salesperson must've really thought they had a sale in the bag after the amount of time spent with us.

Be direct, be complimentary and nice enough to have a respectful and pleasant time - it is fairly interesting to see different places and what they have to offer - but really being honest and respectful of the salesperson's time is what matters. 

If they know they have no shot of selling you anything, they will break off sooner to give you whatever freebies to get you out the door so they can try to end the day with a sale.

charis

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2324
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2018, 09:32:23 AM »
If they give a you a hard time after you say no, have your spouse leave to "take a call."  After a couple of minutes, have him return and say that there's been a death in the family and you have to leave.  Pick up your gift on the way out. 

Lanthiriel

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 803
  • Location: Portlandia
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2018, 10:33:35 AM »
I did one in Vegas that was supposed to be 90 minutes and took 5 hours. I agree with the advice of not being too nice. They clearly thought we were interested because we were too engaged in the presentation. We went through two additional rounds of sales people after our initial person. The last guy actually straight up yelled at us for "being a fucking waste of time." But we did get cheap show tickets, so that was nice. I don't think I'd do it again.

mm1970

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 9005
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2018, 10:36:07 AM »
We scored a 3 night stay at a resort in Sedona, AZ for $50 ($150 upfront - $100 visa card when we attend the presentation) in a few weeks.  I know it's no obligation to purchase and there is literally no way in hell we'd ever agree to purchase a timeshare, but people keep warning us about high pressure sales tactics and the presentations dragging on way too long. 


So with that in mind,
1) who's done one of these timeshare presentations?
2) what has your experience been?
3) what are your best tips to keep the presentation moving along and getting out of there with a minimum of pain?
4) what are some good and effect lines for indicating your utter lack of interest?

Edited to add: it's with Diamond Resorts International, if anyone has particular experience with that company.
I've not done one of those but one of my coworkers have.  We just sat politely through it and when it was over we said "thanks" and left.

If it helps, we stayed at a Diamond Resorts site once, I think (Palm Springs).  It was a condo with plenty of space for the 4 of us to sleep, a great pool, and decent pool-side food.  Quite nice and about the same price as a hotel room, so a great deal for the 2 nights.  The only downside is that they were way understaffed as far as cleaning goes, so we weren't able to check in until quite a bit of time after check in time.  And the dishwasher in the unit was leaky. 

So, why get a timeshare when you can rent others timeshares?  I know we all know this.

CCCA

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 625
  • Location: Bay Area, California
  • born before the 80's
    • FI programming
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2018, 11:25:35 AM »
thanks everyone who responded so far.  I think we'll probably make it clear (firmly and often) that we have no intention of buying anything and just came for the heavily discounted stay. 


Hopefully we're not stuck there for 5 hours!  yikes.




boarder42

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8095
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2018, 11:33:47 AM »
thanks everyone who responded so far.  I think we'll probably make it clear (firmly and often) that we have no intention of buying anything and just came for the heavily discounted stay. 


Hopefully we're not stuck there for 5 hours!  yikes.

You are the only reason you'd be there 5 hours you can leave after the agreed to time 90 or 60 mins or whatever

charis

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2324
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2018, 12:11:00 PM »
thanks everyone who responded so far.  I think we'll probably make it clear (firmly and often) that we have no intention of buying anything and just came for the heavily discounted stay. 


Hopefully we're not stuck there for 5 hours!  yikes.

You are the only reason you'd be there 5 hours you can leave after the agreed to time 90 or 60 mins or whatever

Exactly, if you are there for 5 hours (or even 2), it's because you haven't left.  A little secret, everyone says they aren't intending to buy, that's built into their sales tactic.  I've been to a few presentations (when I was young - it's absolutely not worth my time anymore) and they were never ended by the salesperson.  You actually have to get up and leave. 

pdxbator

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 229
  • Location: Portland, Oregon
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2018, 12:19:21 PM »
Please follow up with this! I'd like to go to Sedona in March and would be interested in staying somewhere.

boarder42

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8095
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2018, 01:20:53 PM »
Please follow up with this! I'd like to go to Sedona in March and would be interested in staying somewhere.

i'd hope you plan to stay somewhere.  its hard to stay nowhere.  physics typically prevents it.

Curmudgeon

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 41
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #12 on: August 29, 2018, 01:42:41 PM »
I used to get calls/mailings for stuff like this all the time.  But I didn't have the time to spend, so I never replied (or ended the discussion promptly if it was a phone call).  As a result, I think I got taken off the 'lists', because I don't get these offers anymore.  But now I've got time, and I should be in the target demographic for these offers.  How do I trigger getting my name back on the 'list'? 

boarder42

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8095
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #13 on: August 29, 2018, 01:53:18 PM »
I used to get calls/mailings for stuff like this all the time.  But I didn't have the time to spend, so I never replied (or ended the discussion promptly if it was a phone call).  As a result, I think I got taken off the 'lists', because I don't get these offers anymore.  But now I've got time, and I should be in the target demographic for these offers.  How do I trigger getting my name back on the 'list'?

you can actually call marriott and ask what promos they have act like you missed a call from them- i think they allow 5 lifetime before they just assume you're never going to buy. You can also go onto https://www.diamondresorts.com/deals/

and see they have promos there - i assume you could do this with different companies and get back on their lists again.

katsiki

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1831
  • Age: 41
  • Location: La.
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #14 on: August 29, 2018, 01:57:01 PM »
This is probably not the MMM answer but I wouldn't go.  Not worth the hassle and BS.  These salespeople are worse than the worst car salesmen.

boarder42

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8095
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #15 on: August 29, 2018, 02:01:51 PM »
i'll go ahead and tell my "horror" story - i actually found it entertaining and it got me alot of extra points but some people would be super pissed and never do timeshare presentations again - i'm a cheap ass so i'll do them all the time depending on the offer.

we took one for vegas at Hilton vacations club back in 2012.  We were sitting at the pool the morning before we had our appt. being classy passing a bag of wine back and forth.  so we were pretty tipsy heading in.  But i typically still carry myself pretty well prior to my blackout state which i didnt get to b/c i remember all of this.  anyways.  we go in tell them we're just there for the free nights and our dude says awesome we'll get thru this quickly and we're rolling thru and then they bring in the "ringer" to try and hard sell us we say we're not interested he doesnt listen and keeps trying different things ...

Finally he turns to my wife who happens to have a huge gash on her forehead from a wakeboard accident 2 weeks before where she had to get 30 stitches.  and he asks her "Now how did you really get that gash on your head" insuating i beat my wife. 

Now i'm not sure what his expectation was here - oh whoops you caught me i'll spend 50k on your timeshare now! but we promptly ended the meeting called the manager over - they gave us more free shit i was diamond with hilton hotels at the time i called them up and they gave me 100k more free HHonors points and we left but WTF that guy was thinking i dont know.  I look back and laugh at it bc how many times has that worked for him before.  I also received a phone call saying he'd been fired 2 weeks later.

Some may fhind this a bad story but i think its hilarious and it scored me a ton of bonus stuff.

CCCA

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 625
  • Location: Bay Area, California
  • born before the 80's
    • FI programming
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #16 on: August 29, 2018, 02:56:15 PM »
i'll go ahead and tell my "horror" story - i actually found it entertaining and it got me alot of extra points but some people would be super pissed and never do timeshare presentations again - i'm a cheap ass so i'll do them all the time depending on the offer.

we took one for vegas at Hilton vacations club back in 2012.  We were sitting at the pool the morning before we had our appt. being classy passing a bag of wine back and forth.  so we were pretty tipsy heading in.  But i typically still carry myself pretty well prior to my blackout state which i didnt get to b/c i remember all of this.  anyways.  we go in tell them we're just there for the free nights and our dude says awesome we'll get thru this quickly and we're rolling thru and then they bring in the "ringer" to try and hard sell us we say we're not interested he doesnt listen and keeps trying different things ...

Finally he turns to my wife who happens to have a huge gash on her forehead from a wakeboard accident 2 weeks before where she had to get 30 stitches.  and he asks her "Now how did you really get that gash on your head" insuating i beat my wife. 

Now i'm not sure what his expectation was here - oh whoops you caught me i'll spend 50k on your timeshare now! but we promptly ended the meeting called the manager over - they gave us more free shit i was diamond with hilton hotels at the time i called them up and they gave me 100k more free HHonors points and we left but WTF that guy was thinking i dont know.  I look back and laugh at it bc how many times has that worked for him before.  I also received a phone call saying he'd been fired 2 weeks later.

Some may fhind this a bad story but i think its hilarious and it scored me a ton of bonus stuff.


In making the reservation and scheduling the presentation time (2 separate calls), they've told me 4 times that I cannot drink or be drunk during the presentation or they will make us pay for our rooms.  Seems like that (going to these things drunk) is apparently a thing.

boarder42

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8095
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #17 on: August 29, 2018, 05:18:25 PM »
i'll go ahead and tell my "horror" story - i actually found it entertaining and it got me alot of extra points but some people would be super pissed and never do timeshare presentations again - i'm a cheap ass so i'll do them all the time depending on the offer.

we took one for vegas at Hilton vacations club back in 2012.  We were sitting at the pool the morning before we had our appt. being classy passing a bag of wine back and forth.  so we were pretty tipsy heading in.  But i typically still carry myself pretty well prior to my blackout state which i didnt get to b/c i remember all of this.  anyways.  we go in tell them we're just there for the free nights and our dude says awesome we'll get thru this quickly and we're rolling thru and then they bring in the "ringer" to try and hard sell us we say we're not interested he doesnt listen and keeps trying different things ...

Finally he turns to my wife who happens to have a huge gash on her forehead from a wakeboard accident 2 weeks before where she had to get 30 stitches.  and he asks her "Now how did you really get that gash on your head" insuating i beat my wife. 

Now i'm not sure what his expectation was here - oh whoops you caught me i'll spend 50k on your timeshare now! but we promptly ended the meeting called the manager over - they gave us more free shit i was diamond with hilton hotels at the time i called them up and they gave me 100k more free HHonors points and we left but WTF that guy was thinking i dont know.  I look back and laugh at it bc how many times has that worked for him before.  I also received a phone call saying he'd been fired 2 weeks later.

Some may fhind this a bad story but i think its hilarious and it scored me a ton of bonus stuff.


In making the reservation and scheduling the presentation time (2 separate calls), they've told me 4 times that I cannot drink or be drunk during the presentation or they will make us pay for our rooms.  Seems like that (going to these things drunk) is apparently a thing.

Prove I'm drunk.

the_fixer

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1166
  • Location: Colorado
  • mind on my money money on my mind
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #18 on: August 29, 2018, 08:22:20 PM »
My wife got sucked into attending one and when they were saying what a great investment it was I pulled up all of the listings of the time shares they were trying to sell that were listed for almost nothing and they asked us to leave :)

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk


elliha

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 447
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #19 on: August 30, 2018, 01:47:08 AM »
I would if it is possible schedule something that happens after the presentation so that I would not be tempted to be nice and let them go on talking too long. "Thanks for your presenation, I am sorry we have to leave now for x. We have been looking forward to doing x for several weeks now so we are quite excited. Bye!"

boarder42

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8095
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #20 on: August 30, 2018, 04:22:59 AM »
My wife got sucked into attending one and when they were saying what a great investment it was I pulled up all of the listings of the time shares they were trying to sell that were listed for almost nothing and they asked us to leave :)

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

Buying second hand or inheriting a time share since the upfront cost is so tiny compared to buying new can actually be worth it for a savvy traveler who uses it properly. After extensive research I chose to inherit my grandfather's time share with my dad so I'm protected if they do something stupid I can just take my name off the lease and let it die with my dad. But for an example. Again ignoring upfront cost to purchase. We're going to stay 7 nights ocean front on Kauai for around 700 dollars in a 3 bedroom condo based on the annual cost of points. You can't even find that on Airbnb or VRBO. 

So while they have a bad stigma due to sales tactics and the fact they aren't worth what they sell them to you for when you try to resell. They are worth buying second hand if youve done your research and know how to use it

talltexan

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4453
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #21 on: August 30, 2018, 08:10:56 AM »
My wife and I got sucked into one of these at Myrtle beach. She is nice, and indulged the salesman quite a bit. I absent-mindedly mentioned that we were a little tight on cash because of some "litigation on another real estate transaction", and that seemed to end things really quickly.

I wasn't being strategic, tt was true, we'd sold our home two years earlier and were just settling a law suit from the buyers in that case. But it sure made me sound like a high-risk client to the salesman. You're welcome to use that line if you need an extra tool to shut things down.

HipGnosis

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1682
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #22 on: August 30, 2018, 10:31:59 AM »
Ask three questions;
How long do I have to be here to get the gift card?
How much are the fees and when do they end?
Is your buy-back policy in writing?

Repeat as necessary.

robartsd

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3348
  • Location: Sacramento, CA
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #23 on: August 30, 2018, 11:37:38 AM »
I've only been to one on property presentation. The offer was 2 nights, but we got 4 by requesting Monday and Tuesday nights during an off peak time (early May) - they extended so we could attend a presentation Friday morning. We enjoyed our 4 night stay then attended the presentation.

IIRC there was only one other couple at the presentation. The presentation started with a video about the properties in the group (the timeshare on offer had 4 or 5 resorts in Nevada, mostly around lake Tahoe - members could schedule any week at any of the properties - the stay and presentation were at what I believe is the least desirable of the Tahoe properties). In the one on one sales after the video, they asked questions on how important taking an annual vacation is to our family. They talked up how easy it is to transfer into timeshare exchange programs and how desirable the properties you're buying into are making it easy to go anywhere you want. They glossed over the fees (annual maintenance for the property, fees to use exchanges).

Looking at the fees it was clear to me that we generally wouldn't get enough value from joining to be worth the fees even if the buy in was $0. If you do think a timeshare will be any value to you, look to pick it up cheap from someone just trying to escape the overhead. Our relatively easy exit from the presentation we attended was saying we weren't interested at this time because we were currently shopping for our first home. I think the salesperson easily realized it wasn't worth competing with another big purchase that was not related to vacations.

We also once attended a presentation in town that offered a voucher for later travel. They claimed that there would be not pressure, but in actuality they used high pressure sales techniques (mostly tonight only discounts). The voucher had so many hoops to jump through we didn't end up using it. At least we didn't spend anything but gas and time on that one.

CCCA

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 625
  • Location: Bay Area, California
  • born before the 80's
    • FI programming
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #24 on: August 30, 2018, 11:55:05 AM »
awesome tips and stories so far. Keep em coming!


boarder42

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8095
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #25 on: August 30, 2018, 01:36:43 PM »
I've only been to one on property presentation. The offer was 2 nights, but we got 4 by requesting Monday and Tuesday nights during an off peak time (early May) - they extended so we could attend a presentation Friday morning. We enjoyed our 4 night stay then attended the presentation.

IIRC there was only one other couple at the presentation. The presentation started with a video about the properties in the group (the timeshare on offer had 4 or 5 resorts in Nevada, mostly around lake Tahoe - members could schedule any week at any of the properties - the stay and presentation were at what I believe is the least desirable of the Tahoe properties). In the one on one sales after the video, they asked questions on how important taking an annual vacation is to our family. They talked up how easy it is to transfer into timeshare exchange programs and how desirable the properties you're buying into are making it easy to go anywhere you want. They glossed over the fees (annual maintenance for the property, fees to use exchanges).

Looking at the fees it was clear to me that we generally wouldn't get enough value from joining to be worth the fees even if the buy in was $0. If you do think a timeshare will be any value to you, look to pick it up cheap from someone just trying to escape the overhead. Our relatively easy exit from the presentation we attended was saying we weren't interested at this time because we were currently shopping for our first home. I think the salesperson easily realized it wasn't worth competing with another big purchase that was not related to vacations.

We also once attended a presentation in town that offered a voucher for later travel. They claimed that there would be not pressure, but in actuality they used high pressure sales techniques (mostly tonight only discounts). The voucher had so many hoops to jump through we didn't end up using it. At least we didn't spend anything but gas and time on that one.

this is a really good point NEVER take offers that are with a voucher b/c of the hoops to jump thru make sure you get your benefits at the same time as the presentation.

Cassie

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6980
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #26 on: August 30, 2018, 11:59:54 PM »
If you leave before being officially released they will charge you for the nights you stayed.  After being insulted etc we finally were released. Would never do it again.

Goldielocks

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6978
  • Location: BC
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #27 on: August 31, 2018, 05:02:18 PM »
I did one in Vegas that was supposed to be 90 minutes and took 5 hours. I agree with the advice of not being too nice. They clearly thought we were interested because we were too engaged in the presentation. We went through two additional rounds of sales people after our initial person. The last guy actually straight up yelled at us for "being a fucking waste of time." But we did get cheap show tickets, so that was nice. I don't think I'd do it again.
We do a timeshare presentation every few years.  I am interested in their business model and sales techniques, from an observational interest point of view.

Like lantririel, we did a Vegas one last time.  Because we were owners elsewhere (don't ask), we were promised no videos / trapped in a room, etc.

What actually happened:

1.  Met, signed in, and recieved a personal sales person.
2. Did the property and apartment tour, ate a free lunch at the restaurant with the sales person.
3.  Sat down for a video -- we stood up and started to leave, but they said it was not the cattle call one (we were one of two in the room, and it was short).
4.  Declined formally in the sales room.
5.  Had to talk to the guy's manager, and declined again.  She kept showing better and better offers.  "here is one that was returned to us and I can offer it to you for 35% less than the best price I already showed you". And they kept leaving and making you wait 10minutes for the next person, but then it was the same person, etc.  Lots of waiting.  Lots of repeated no.  Good sales techniques for making you buy.  (some people call this agressive, but it wasn't pushy, just very compelling and I knew it was not a good deal while they said it, too, so I respect the technique).
6 .  Then we had to go to the "used / after market sales" guy.  Now the places were over 70% lower than woman upstairs -- still no.  This last ditch guy was rude after we said no for the second time.
7. Finally get passed to the "gift" room.  A long wait for the person to process our "gift -- Circ de Soleil tickets.

We left after about 3.5 hours, expecting the 90 minute to 2 hours.

But -- the circe de soliel -- on a weeknight, ended up upgrading at the venue for free to inner ring premier seats.  Wow.  :-) Amazing.

What would have helped -- go to here. www.TUG2.NET  print off the resale by owner values for the place you are visiting / surrounding area.   Bring this page with you.

After about 20 minutes, bring out the resale sheet and show your first sales person -- can you beat $3k on a unit and $500 per year of maintenance fees?  That is the going rate here...repeat with   " I am not interested at this time".."No".. "How about you ask your manager"...?   

Etc. and so on.    It will allow you to progress through the levels faster, anyway, if you bring your homework.

MrThatsDifferent

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2176
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #28 on: September 01, 2018, 08:38:52 AM »
I did this in Orlando to get half price tickets to Universal Studios. Was it worth 90 minutes of my time? Yes. Was it torturous? Absolutely. They will make you stay the whole time no matter what and my goodness the sales tactics! Every single one in the book. Hereís how you survive, become curious about what they do and how they do it. Observe everything. But insist that there is no way that you can afford it even though they will try to make it affordable. Donít pretend youíre interested, the goal is to get them to spend their energy on another sucker and give up on you. They are such scams, itís amazing to me that people sign.

spicykissa

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 158
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #29 on: September 02, 2018, 02:45:10 AM »
My parents did this when I was kid for discounted Disney World tickets. My brother threw a fit (like crying, rolling on the ground, complete meltdown) after awhile, because it was so boring, which I think helped get us out faster. So perhaps if you have an unruly child you could borrow, that might help?

jj2

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 17
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #30 on: September 02, 2018, 09:57:02 PM »
My wife and i sat through a timeshare presentation in Sedona several years ago.  This was an eye opening experience for both of us as we had never been through this before and were quite naive.  Neither of us really understood that the 'gift' being offered came with strings attached.  the resort was great and the salespeople were (of course) very nice.  We actually signed up for a trial 2 year 'membership' but never actually used it because we couldn't find any places we wanted to go.  Luckily, that was the end of it, and i consider it a good learning experience (yet another). 

Even though we got some good freebies (nice hotel, jeep tour), I would never do it again

But, that Sedona area - wow!  Stunning.

Telecaster

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2601
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #31 on: September 02, 2018, 10:07:32 PM »
My wife and I did it one time with Wyndam.    Gawd it was horrible.  I went in with an open mind, in that I was willing to listen to the guy's pitch.  But financially it doesn't make a lick of sense.  Then the guy became a total douchebag.  We wound up with $200 or something, but it was also 1.5 hours out of our vacation.  Never again.   

MrThatsDifferent

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2176
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #32 on: September 03, 2018, 05:34:16 AM »
My wife and I did it one time with Wyndam.    Gawd it was horrible.  I went in with an open mind, in that I was willing to listen to the guy's pitch.  But financially it doesn't make a lick of sense.  Then the guy became a total douchebag.  We wound up with $200 or something, but it was also 1.5 hours out of our vacation.  Never again.

Yeah, they become quite mean when you donít sign up. Classic sales bullying. We did something nice for you, you owe us! Now, agree to our financially irresponsible offer!

MrSal

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 889
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #33 on: September 03, 2018, 06:14:05 PM »
errr.... just say no?

I dont see, no matter what tactics they use - unless it involves blackmail in where their pointing a gun to your SO - how is it hard to deny something that you know before hand does not make sense.

I have been to 3-4 of these... while in the first one i had fun trying to retort their arguments with math and finance...  the others i just didnt care and kept saying thanks but no thanks. got out of there faster than the first few times.

CCCA

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 625
  • Location: Bay Area, California
  • born before the 80's
    • FI programming
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #34 on: September 05, 2018, 01:22:25 PM »
errr.... just say no?

I dont see, no matter what tactics they use - unless it involves blackmail in where their pointing a gun to your SO - how is it hard to deny something that you know before hand does not make sense.

I have been to 3-4 of these... while in the first one i had fun trying to retort their arguments with math and finance...  the others i just didnt care and kept saying thanks but no thanks. got out of there faster than the first few times.


Yeah, we'll definitely say no.  I think more of the question is how to say no, i.e. what are the best and most effective ways to do it.  My wife and I aren't the most forceful of personalities (generally polite and quiet) so understanding what works and what doesn't will definitely help us be more effective in our refusals. 


Anyway, thanks to everyone for their stories and suggestions.  very fun to read.  I'll let you know how it goes (still a few more weeks till our trip).

Davnasty

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2673
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #35 on: September 05, 2018, 02:11:44 PM »
When we did one of these we went way over the time limit but they had picked us up from another location so we couldn't just walk out, plus we wanted our gift card. We did try to move it along but they just kept using the "Ok, we'll let you go but just one more thing". We probably would have gotten out a little faster if we had been more forceful and pointed out the stated time limit. Saying you have something scheduled right after the normal allotted time is probably a good tactic.

One other thing I thought was interesting, there seemed to be a lot of people in the room who were signing up. I still wonder if that many people really end up buying or if they were planted to show us how happy everyone else was to purchase. And if they were legit buyers, did they pay the $999 (actually it may have been $0+annual fees, can't remember/wasn't listening) we finally got offered or did they pay the initial price of $30,000? Bad deal either way, but if they paid more than they had too? Ouch.

ABC123

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 263
  • Location: Nashville
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #36 on: September 05, 2018, 02:12:00 PM »
When I was a kid my parents used to go to time share presentations.  I remember going to one with them, I think it was in Orlando, and after the guy was done they of course said no.  He kept on and on, and they finally told him they had planned to say no all along.  The guy went off on them.  How dare you come here and waste my time when you aren't even willing to consider it, blah blah blah.  It was pretty funny.  They still got the free park tickets, or whatever they got that time.

acroy

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1699
  • Age: 43
  • Location: Dallas TX
    • SWAMI
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #37 on: September 05, 2018, 02:48:09 PM »
my advise would be cancel the trip. Too much time and hassle. Pay your own way on vaca.

I've sat through a few of these in years past for the bennies, just kept saying no, but still, it wasted almost half a day of my life.

SummerLovin

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 64
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #38 on: September 05, 2018, 04:03:02 PM »
I've owned a timeshare for nearly 20 years and overpaid initially, it was still worth keeping.  If I had it to do over again, I would buy on secondary market. 
I've attended many presentations over the years since they are always looking to "upgrade" my ownership.
* Tell them upfront that you are only there for the freebies.
* Tell them you are not interested, and don't want to waste any more of their time or yours.
* Having 2 of you could work in your favor, you can play good cop, bad cop- "honey I told you this was a rip off" and start an argument, with dirty looks.
* Say you have something to do immediately after, if you can't lie then schedule something. (Make sure your presentation time is scheduled beforehand otherwise they might offer to put you in another slot)
* Go in with the costs of similar timeshares on the secondary market
*  Ask them why you'd pay for a timeshare when you can use that money to put down on a rental property, and gain equity
*  Ask to see the next manager in the chain
* Never tell them you can't afford it because they will find a way to get your "payments" low enough that you might consider it
I used to enjoy going to see the tactics, but now it's just tedious and the "gifts" are not worth my time.

What is your time worth? Only you can decide that.  Good Luck!

katsiki

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1831
  • Age: 41
  • Location: La.
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #39 on: September 05, 2018, 07:15:32 PM »
my advise would be cancel the trip. Too much time and hassle. Pay your own way on vaca.

I've sat through a few of these in years past for the bennies, just kept saying no, but still, it wasted almost half a day of my life.
+1.  Totally agree.  Oh yea, I said that last week.

boarder42

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8095
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #40 on: September 05, 2018, 07:36:42 PM »
my advise would be cancel the trip. Too much time and hassle. Pay your own way on vaca.

I've sat through a few of these in years past for the bennies, just kept saying no, but still, it wasted almost half a day of my life.
+1.  Totally agree.  Oh yea, I said that last week.

How much do you earn working. In most cases youre sacrificing 3 hours of total time for 2 people for 150 or more in value that's 50 bucks an hour. As many people as hate their jobs around here. This is a pretty easy way to make a quick buck.

CCCA

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 625
  • Location: Bay Area, California
  • born before the 80's
    • FI programming
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #41 on: September 05, 2018, 10:05:42 PM »
my advise would be cancel the trip. Too much time and hassle. Pay your own way on vaca.

I've sat through a few of these in years past for the bennies, just kept saying no, but still, it wasted almost half a day of my life.
+1.  Totally agree.  Oh yea, I said that last week.

How much do you earn working. In most cases youre sacrificing 3 hours of total time for 2 people for 150 or more in value that's 50 bucks an hour. As many people as hate their jobs around here. This is a pretty easy way to make a quick buck.


we will get a $100 gift card while also getting our 3 night stay at a resort in Sedona for free.  Assuming conservatively the cost is about $150/night, we are getting a $550 value for a 1.5 - 2hr presentation that will range somewhere between amused indifference to painfully frustrating.

zolotiyeruki

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4221
  • Location: State: Denial
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #42 on: September 06, 2018, 06:53:44 AM »
We did it once.  Here's what we learned:

1) leave once you've hit the allotted time
2) if you have options for your gift, get the one that you receive immediately, i.e. NOT a voucher.
3) be firm and say no.  And no.  And no.

The price they quoted us was something like $26,000 plus over $1000/year in maintenance fees for one week per year at a mid-tier place.  The funny thing is that just a year or two earlier, we had rented one of those timeshares for a week, and it only cost us about $1,300 for a full condo that slept our family of 8 and included a full kitchen.

The maintenance fees astound me.  If you assume that the up-front payment covers the capital cost of the building, that means that the company gets $52,000 per year in maintenance fees for a two-bedroom condo.  That's more than enough to rebuild the entire thing from the studs out, and still have plenty left over.  Sure, they have a cleaning crew, and maintenance for the common areas, but it's not that much.

robartsd

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3348
  • Location: Sacramento, CA
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #43 on: September 06, 2018, 11:38:46 AM »
The maintenance fees astound me.  If you assume that the up-front payment covers the capital cost of the building, that means that the company gets $52,000 per year in maintenance fees for a two-bedroom condo.  That's more than enough to rebuild the entire thing from the studs out, and still have plenty left over.  Sure, they have a cleaning crew, and maintenance for the common areas, but it's not that much.
Yep, the maintenance costs tend to be comparable to the price a savvy shopper can get booking a stay directly - just low enough that if you actually use it regularly it makes sense to keep it, but not low enough that it makes sense to buy it.

zolotiyeruki

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4221
  • Location: State: Denial
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #44 on: September 06, 2018, 12:25:54 PM »
The maintenance fees astound me.  If you assume that the up-front payment covers the capital cost of the building, that means that the company gets $52,000 per year in maintenance fees for a two-bedroom condo.  That's more than enough to rebuild the entire thing from the studs out, and still have plenty left over.  Sure, they have a cleaning crew, and maintenance for the common areas, but it's not that much.
Yep, the maintenance costs tend to be comparable to the price a savvy shopper can get booking a stay directly - just low enough that if you actually use it regularly it makes sense to keep it, but not low enough that it makes sense to buy it.
But once you factor in the opportunity cost of the $26k, the numbers are terrible.  If you assume 7% returns in the market, the timeshare now costs you ($1000/yr maintenance + $1,400 foregone returns) = $2400 for a week of accommodations.

EconDiva

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1180
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #45 on: September 06, 2018, 12:43:36 PM »
I've only done 2 of these I think.

The last one in Aruba was horrible.  I was willing not to go but they said we were getting $100 dinner gift cards each.  I was hesitant as I didn't want to spend 2 hours there.  They told us it was 90 minutes but I estimated a bit over 2 hours just knowing it would take longer.

Well it took about 4.  And they argued we would get $50 gift cards for dinner instead of $100.  I hate being less than nice to people but I had to be the one to stand up in our group and argue against it because it wasn't what we were told.  I would have much rather spent the time enjoying Aruba and pay for my dinner that night than spend 4 hours with those people.  And they were so rude about the gift card thing at the end.  I was upfront at the beginning and say how much I paid to stay there and prefer to travel for free so I'm not buying.  Said that in Cancun and they still put the pressure on as always but I just keep repeating the same thing about traveling for free/close to free and thus not being interested.

Curmudgeon

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 41
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #46 on: September 06, 2018, 01:57:30 PM »
The maintenance fees astound me.  If you assume that the up-front payment covers the capital cost of the building, that means that the company gets $52,000 per year in maintenance fees for a two-bedroom condo.  That's more than enough to rebuild the entire thing from the studs out, and still have plenty left over.  Sure, they have a cleaning crew, and maintenance for the common areas, but it's not that much.
Yep, the maintenance costs tend to be comparable to the price a savvy shopper can get booking a stay directly - just low enough that if you actually use it regularly it makes sense to keep it, but not low enough that it makes sense to buy it.
But once you factor in the opportunity cost of the $26k, the numbers are terrible.  If you assume 7% returns in the market, the timeshare now costs you ($1000/yr maintenance + $1,400 foregone returns) = $2400 for a week of accommodations.

This reminds me of the last time I went to one of these, 30ish years ago... The salesman started off trying to sell it to me as an investment.  But I pointed out that I had seen lots of second-hand timeshares for sale at lower price than what he was quoting, so I asked how it could possibly be a good investment if the price went down after you bought it.  He then switched to say "You don't buy this as in investment, you buy it as a place to spend quality time - you're buying the experience!"  I then pointed out that for about the cost of the yearly maintenance + booking fees, we could afford to just rent a place wherever we wanted, he said "Yeah, but it's not about just getting a vacation, it's an investment.  At which point I stared at him while his brain caught up to the fact that he had just come full circle and contradicted himself, and he sheepishly ruffled through some papers on his desk.  The presentation ended very shortly after that.

robartsd

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3348
  • Location: Sacramento, CA
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #47 on: September 07, 2018, 09:42:54 AM »
But once you factor in the opportunity cost of the $26k, the numbers are terrible.  If you assume 7% returns in the market, the timeshare now costs you ($1000/yr maintenance + $1,400 foregone returns) = $2400 for a week of accommodations.
Exactly what I said, the costs are too high to justify the purchase. However, once it is owned, the opportunity cost switches from the original sale price to the fair market value on the secondary market minus seller transaction costs. As soon as you buy, you loose the difference.

MrSal

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 889
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #48 on: September 07, 2018, 04:33:53 PM »
errr.... just say no?

I dont see, no matter what tactics they use - unless it involves blackmail in where their pointing a gun to your SO - how is it hard to deny something that you know before hand does not make sense.

I have been to 3-4 of these... while in the first one i had fun trying to retort their arguments with math and finance...  the others i just didnt care and kept saying thanks but no thanks. got out of there faster than the first few times.


Yeah, we'll definitely say no.  I think more of the question is how to say no, i.e. what are the best and most effective ways to do it.  My wife and I aren't the most forceful of personalities (generally polite and quiet) so understanding what works and what doesn't will definitely help us be more effective in our refusals. 


Anyway, thanks to everyone for their stories and suggestions.  very fun to read.  I'll let you know how it goes (still a few more weeks till our trip).

I undestand your position, but if you try to be polite and give reasons not to go for it, they will always come back with a solution - Sales 101. I did it the first time and they kept coming back at me with a solution. "Oh you dont have money? Here's a loan for only 120$ month" and so forth ... it's best to say... Sorry but I am not interested at all. I'm here for the freebie and am not interested in the offer. Thank you.


I'm a red panda

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8202
  • Location: United States
Re: Tips for surviving a timeshare presentation
« Reply #49 on: September 07, 2018, 06:58:00 PM »
This is probably not the MMM answer but I wouldn't go.  Not worth the hassle and BS.  These salespeople are worse than the worst car salesmen.

I couldn't tell you what Pete things; but a lot of what he espouses is about maximizing happiness.  I wouldn't subject myself to this BS.  Unless I was getting a hotel and flight comped in Fiji, I'd just rather pay the vacation myself.

We were recently at a nice place in Missouri, and they called us a few times about the timeshare in exchange for like $500 in theme park tickets.  We were going to sacrifice one of the sets of adults, but they told us ALL occupants had to be there for the 3 hours.  - 4 adults, 1 infant, 1 toddler, and 3 children? NO WAY.  They told us "oh we specialize in kids, they'll love it".  I have a hard time believing that...