Author Topic: Timing the purchase of a new car  (Read 8000 times)

dragonwalker

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Timing the purchase of a new car
« on: December 26, 2015, 09:53:29 PM »
I currently drive a 2009 Honda Civic that currently has 60,000 miles, I got it new. The mileage on the car has been pretty consistent throughout. I'm a pretty conservative driver meaning I take it pretty easy on the car and try my best always to go about 60 or so on the freeway and I keep up with all the regular maintenance. I don't drive daily as I tend to normally bike to work.

This may sound petty but recently by which I mean the past year or so I've felt that I've "deserved" more. Right now I'm 27 and been working at a decent job for the past five years and it just seems everyone at work and their mother has gotten new cars. I know that's a terrible premise to get a car. However, I often I feel like I should live a little before I really have to get to practical down the line.

I don't have a family and I don't have any significant other so now's the time (so my coworkers say). I have been looking around and thought perhaps the Acura ILX may not be to insensible. I've thought that even if I were to do this I'd still like to get a 1-2 year old around 20K miles or less so I'm looking at around $20K. The KBB for my car puts it at about $8.5K. I have the ability to just buy it outright or finance, whichever option the dealer might get me the lowest price on.

My main question is, when is the best time to sell a used car during it's lifecycle? I'm not sure if the depreciation over the next few years will really eat into the value or will it plateau at some point? Although I'm looking at a new car I'm still trying to time it so that it makes sense. I have to say it's not even a sure thing I will get one soon.

I do know that I always had the plan of getting a new car before 10 years or 100K miles whichever comes first because I think at that point the cost of maintenance has a debatable value. No I'm not just talking the mathematical value because I'm sure some math wiz here will figure I should keep my car for the next 30 years but the intangible value of having a car which I won't be judged to harshly on.

Yes what I did just say I'm sure goes against the norms of the goals of the people on this forum but I must say I live to much in a world where I'm judged to much by things like that. I'd like to believe that I don't do it myself but I do, even if subconsciously.

I know I've gone a bit off topic. Maybe someone has dealt with these thoughts before? I'd still like to know about timing of selling the car though. Thanks. 

Exflyboy

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2015, 10:25:23 PM »
You now own the car at about the right time on its depreciation curve. Its reliable, gets the job done and does not cost a lot to maintain.

Also are you FI yet?.. I assume no.

If you get a nicer car what does it do that current one doesn't (nothing). What if you upgrade, what will be the next trinket you feel you deserve?

My advice is to learn to enjoy the fact that your FI will be sooner than it would than if you go buying things you don't need.


JAYSLOL

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2015, 12:13:28 AM »
...so now's the time (so my coworkers say).

What do you do for a living and why do you care what your coworkers think you should do??!!

Your Civic is in it's prime years, it still looks like new, nothing much is going to wear out or need replacing for the next 60k or so and yet during that time (say another 4 or 5 years) it will still hold most of its $8.5k KBB value.  Like only $500 a year depreciation if you take care of it and don't put on crazy loads of miles

You will thank yourself later if you spend a little more time going through and reading MMM's blog and a little less time listening to what coworkers think and drooling over shiny new things "you deserve".

dragonwalker

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2015, 01:04:22 AM »
@jays, I work at a bank and no it's not important that I have a nice car as a function of my job. I just thought it would be nicer to be in something a bit more comfortable. Yes I know it's a luxury.

Honestly I'm 75% sure I won't be getting a new car anytime soon but what do you think about the 10 year or 100K mark to change for a Honda Civic? At that point I'm really not sure because of the rising potential for costs of upkeep. I have been fortunate so far and there haven't been any issues so far aside from regular maintenance on the car. There are starting to be a few cosmetic blemishes developing because I have to park outside which I'm sure will worsen by that time (but yes I understand those won't mechanically effect the car) but I have to draw the line somewhere.

Astatine

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2015, 01:48:19 AM »
Don't do it.

We have a 15 year old Toyota Corolla. We had one year a few years ago when the cost of repairs got ridiculous and I was thinking about getting a newer car (the main reasons for me is reliability and safety - new cars are safer than old if you're in a crash). But, after that one year, the costs of servicing and repairs have gone way down again.

I would not try to second-guess when your car's repairs are going to get expensive. Keep your car as long as possible and if you have 2 years in a row of expensive repairs, then maybe think about getting a newer car, but only then. And older than 1-2 years if/when you do upgrade your car. Let someone else suck up the depreciation cost, not you.

use2betrix

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2015, 06:17:44 AM »
With something like a Honda or Toyota, I'd say 150k should be the bare minimum. Then when you want something "new" you could splurge a bit and get something a few years old and around 30-40k miles even. Used enough to take off some of the hit, but still pretty "new." Now if you really wanted the smartest choice financially, I'd probably go more like 4-5 years old and 60-70k miles.

I am 27 and understand your pain. The smartest thing you can do is buy and keep them as long as possible. You almost always lose selling.

JAYSLOL

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2015, 09:34:18 AM »
@jays, I work at a bank and no it's not important that I have a nice car as a function of my job. I just thought it would be nicer to be in something a bit more comfortable. Yes I know it's a luxury.

Honestly I'm 75% sure I won't be getting a new car anytime soon but what do you think about the 10 year or 100K mark to change for a Honda Civic? At that point I'm really not sure because of the rising potential for costs of upkeep. I have been fortunate so far and there haven't been any issues so far aside from regular maintenance on the car. There are starting to be a few cosmetic blemishes developing because I have to park outside which I'm sure will worsen by that time (but yes I understand those won't mechanically effect the car) but I have to draw the line somewhere.

More comfortable than a basically still brand new car?  Dig a little deeper into the purpose of this place and you might find that you start challenging your assumptions.  I've been there.  Would it actually make you happier to spend this enormous amount of money to upgrade your vehicle?  Why do you feel you need to be more comfortable than you already are?  Would you be happier and healthier with more or less driving designed into your life?  Wait, do you even need a car? 

I've been a "car guy" since I was a really young kid, I mean I'm REALLY into cars.  My parents tell me before I was 3 I could name virtually every car and truck's make and model on the road.  Most the friends I hung out with growing up shared my interest in cars.  I took an automotive apprenticeship program after high school and worked in a couple shops for a few years.  I've also bought a cool car or 2 along the way and spent money upgrading them.  So I understand the desire to have something fun and comfortable to drive that looks awesome.

So after years of living my life revolving around cars, I had a problem.  None of it was making me any happier.  It was also making me a lot poorer, but that's not as important IMO.  So I packed up and volunteered overseas for over a year for something of a change, and I didn't even have a car there.  I came back realizing that the ONLY part of owning a car that I really missed was the freedom of travel it gave me, and that it's that freedom of getting around was the only part of owning a car that made me happy.  All the rest of it was endless wanting of something faster and cooler looking which never actually made me any happier when I did get it because it never felt like enough.  When will it feel like enough for you?

You do need to draw the line somewhere, draw it where it matters - as tool to give you the freedom to go where you want.  That's what my car is for me now, because there are more important things to focus on, and that's all the luxury I'll ever need.

Jack

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #7 on: December 27, 2015, 09:49:19 AM »
Six years old and 60K miles is just about the right age to buy a car, so it's the absolute worst time to sell it!

Honestly I'm 75% sure I won't be getting a new car anytime soon but what do you think about the 10 year or 100K mark to change for a Honda Civic?

Nope. 10 years / 100k is still the prime of the car's life. That might be starting to push it for some shitty Chrysler, but your Honda should be good to go for at least 150K, and on average 200K+.

Only dumbasses sell 100k Hondas, unless there are extenuating circumstances (e.g. selling an S2000 to buy a minivan because you just had triplets or something).
« Last Edit: December 27, 2015, 09:54:51 AM by Jack »

2Birds1Stone

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2015, 10:10:33 AM »
Six years old and 60K miles is just about the right age to buy a car, so it's the absolute worst time to sell it!

This x 100

Bracken_Joy

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #9 on: December 27, 2015, 10:28:59 AM »
OP- FWIW, I think a LOT of people around 27/28 want to buy a new fancy car to feel more "adult" and 'give a gift to themselves'. I'm 26, DH is 27, and MANY of our friends/high school classmates are buying new cars right now. Do you really think 'the masses' tend to have the right idea? 'The masses' are the ones drowning in CC debt, student loans, and auto loans, and feel crushed under the weight of obligation. Instead, look at the purpose of the car. You've been working hard, for half a decade now. That's an achievement, so you feel like you want to be rewarded. Is hedonism really a reward though? You're just pursuing a moving target, and it will always fall short.

If you haven't read it, I highly recommend this post: http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2011/10/22/what-is-hedonic-adaptation-and-how-can-it-turn-you-into-a-sukka/

Blatant

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #10 on: December 27, 2015, 10:47:02 AM »
If you tend to bike to work, how have you managed to put 10k miles a year on a car?

lbmustache

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #11 on: December 27, 2015, 10:55:06 AM »
Read: http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2012/09/18/is-it-convenient-would-i-enjoy-it-wrong-question/

I kind of think you have already made up your mind and wanted people here to justify your choice. Wrong forum. ;)

Also, I think if you maintain your car (wash it, etc.) no one will be judging you for driving a 10yr old Civic.

Bracken_Joy

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #12 on: December 27, 2015, 11:03:34 AM »
Also, I think if you maintain your car (wash it, etc.) no one will be judging you for driving a 10yr old Civic.

A clean and detailed car will always be more impressive than a new dirty one. McDonalds bags on the floor will make even a brand new Tesla look junky.

JAYSLOL

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #13 on: December 27, 2015, 11:11:41 AM »
Read: http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2012/09/18/is-it-convenient-would-i-enjoy-it-wrong-question/

I kind of think you have already made up your mind and wanted people here to justify your choice. Wrong forum. ;)

Also, I think if you maintain your car (wash it, etc.) no one will be judging you for driving a 10yr old Civic.

And anyone who does judge you negatively for owning a used Civic is not worth your time, including potential significant others.

Glenstache

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #14 on: December 27, 2015, 11:23:47 AM »
What is the opportunity cost of the car transition? By opportunity cost, I don't mean just putting the money not spent on a car into an investment. Part of what makes MMM work is the concept of spending money on what will actually make you happier and add value to your life. By and large, this tends to be experiences, not things. If you want to treat yourself, think about things you can do that will make your life better and give you great memories. Take a trip with your SO somewhere special. Take up that hobby you've always been curious about. The point is not so deny ourselves for the sake of an account balance, but to use money as a tool to enjoy our lives more.

Vanguards and Lentils

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #15 on: December 27, 2015, 02:55:21 PM »
Just want to throw in some Epictetus, which relates to the "Hedonic Adaptation" that MMM writes about:

Quote
39. The body is to everyone the measure of the possessions proper for it, just as the foot is of the shoe. If, therefore, you stop at this, you will keep the measure; but if you move beyond it, you must necessarily be carried forward, as down a cliff; as in the case of a shoe, if you go beyond its fitness to the foot, it comes first to be gilded, then purple, and then studded with jewels. For to that which once exceeds a due measure, there is no bound.

A car is meant to get you from A to B. Once it becomes anything more than that to you (a status symbol, a treat for yourself, a way to avoid disdain from your peers), there will be no limit.

However I think the decision for when to replace it from a financial perspective, should be completely separate from this.

Tom Bri

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #16 on: December 27, 2015, 03:18:28 PM »

[/quote]Nope. 10 years / 100k is still the prime of the car's life. That might be starting to push it for some shitty Chrysler, but your Honda should be good to go for at least 150K, and on average 200K+.
[/quote]
THIS! I have the proverbial 'shitty Chrysler', a minivan with <60K miles. It basically sits in the garage now, since I started reading this forum. I have already decided to get rid of the clown car and upgrade to an older, cheaper, more reliable Toyota. Just need to get it sold. I want to get rid of it before the inevitable Chrysler jinx hits.

dragonwalker

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #17 on: December 27, 2015, 03:19:15 PM »
Ok ok, I won't get a new car. I get it, bad idea. I get these phases sometimes and recently it's been happening with more frequency that I think about the car. I'll probably have this talk again at 10 year/100K miles and probably be laughed out the forum, again.

Anyway, anyone know what type of preventative maintenance I should be taking at 60K? So far in the life of the car I've just done regular oil changes, brakes, and tires. I did have the transmission and brake fluids flushed and replaced at 50K.

pbkmaine

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #18 on: December 27, 2015, 03:23:33 PM »
The manual you got with the car should give you a very good idea as to proper maintenance. If you don't have the manual, google it or ask the dealer.


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Exflyboy

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #19 on: December 27, 2015, 03:34:04 PM »
Ok ok, I won't get a new car. I get it, bad idea. I get these phases sometimes and recently it's been happening with more frequency that I think about the car. I'll probably have this talk again at 10 year/100K miles and probably be laughed out the forum, again.

Anyway, anyone know what type of preventative maintenance I should be taking at 60K? So far in the life of the car I've just done regular oil changes, brakes, and tires. I did have the transmission and brake fluids flushed and replaced at 50K.

Right answer.

The most important thing is to know when the timing belt (assuming it has a belt and not a chain) was last changed.. if its due break out the wrenches and change the water pump camshaft and crankshaft seals at the same time as they will always leak at some point,.. usually just after you changed the timing belt..:)

If the engine is interference, if the belt breaks it will smash the open valves into the pistons.. needless to say this is very bad! and very $$$$.

Chenge the oil every 6000miles and you'll be good to go.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2015, 06:13:49 PM by Exflyboy »

JAYSLOL

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #20 on: December 27, 2015, 05:40:46 PM »
Ok ok, I won't get a new car. I get it, bad idea. I get these phases sometimes and recently it's been happening with more frequency that I think about the car. I'll probably have this talk again at 10 year/100K miles and probably be laughed out the forum, again.

Anyway, anyone know what type of preventative maintenance I should be taking at 60K? So far in the life of the car I've just done regular oil changes, brakes, and tires. I did have the transmission and brake fluids flushed and replaced at 50K.

Most important is to keep checking/topping up the oil every time you fill up with fuel.  Make sure it gets changed according to the manual along with the rest of the fluids.  Other than that the best preventative maintenance is to be kind to your car, keep it clean and paint waxed, carpets clean etc.  also avoiding potholes, curbs and off-roading will help to keep your suspension, wheel bearings, steering linkages etc from wearing out due to abuse. 

Drifterrider

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #21 on: December 29, 2015, 11:20:59 AM »

My main question is, when is the best time to sell a used car during it's lifecycle?

The best time is when it no longer has a lifecycle (can't be repaired economically).  If you judge your self worth (or allow others to) based on the car you drive, clothing you wear or house you live in, be prepared to work for the remainder of your life.

A Honda with 60,000 miles has just passed its break in period.  If you take care of it, it will probably last another 200 - 300,000 miles. 

svndezafrohman

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #22 on: December 29, 2015, 11:34:22 AM »
I feel you. A new car would be nice, but that feeling of euphoria will only last a couple day to a couple weeks. Once that passes, the Acura will feel like your old civic.

I am at that phase of wanting a new phone. I have had my samsung S3 for over 3 years now, so looking at all the new phones makes me a little jealous. Then I think about all those people buying the latest phones, just to play games on it, and realize, maybe i don't need a new phone.

Seems like you don't even drive fast, so if its about comfort and the feel of luxury, just buy some nice seat covers!

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #23 on: December 29, 2015, 11:50:09 AM »
The best time is when it no longer has a lifecycle (can't be repaired economically).  If you judge your self worth (or allow others to) based on the car you drive, clothing you wear or house you live in, be prepared to work for the remainder of your life.

A Honda with 60,000 miles has just passed its break in period.  If you take care of it, it will probably last another 200 - 300,000 miles.
Agreed.  And there's one more thing to toss into the equation:  if you do your own maintenance, the costs are very low, even when you get to the 125k-150k mark and a bunch of maintenance items come up at the same time.  For many people, that's the point where "the car can't be repaired economically."  If you're a DIYer (or simply willing to work hard and be a bit adventurous), you can do the maintenance and repair yourself for very little money indeed, and have a car that will go another 100k miles without a hiccup.

My '95 Corolla just hit 200k miles this year.  I changed the timing belt and water pump a couple months back.  Transmission fluid, antifreeze, power steering fluid, brake fluid, and oil changes were easy to do all at the same time, and cost almost nothing.  At this point, there's no major maintenance/repair due for a long time--only oil changes for the next 30k miles.

At the rate things are going, rust is going to kill this car long before any mechanical issues will.

Giro

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #24 on: December 29, 2015, 12:34:08 PM »
I would ask the people you know how much they love their new car once they have it.  I agree that the euphoria only lasts a few days.  After awhile, you are used to it and it's the same as the Honda.

I upgraded my Corolla for a gorgeous luxury car a few years ago.  Within days that new car feeling was gone and as soon as I took the new car in for maintenance the first time, I wanted my Corolla back.  I had a buddy who worked for Toyota and would change my brakes for 5 bucks if I bought the parts.  Yes, FIVE BUCKS.  They were so easy to change.  New fancy car....NOT FIVE BUCKS.

And I'm a car person too.

Gone Fishing

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #25 on: December 29, 2015, 12:43:31 PM »
Sounds like you made the right choice, but just wanted to chime in and say that I ran a 97 Civic to 221k miles over 13 with years with $0, yes $0, in unavoidable repairs and only minimal maintenance (oil changes, spark plugs, brakes, tires) before the engine finally lost compression (probably had something to do with living on the redline for most of its life;).   Not to say other things weren't wrong with it (tired suspension, tired clutch, no A/C, body damage, etc) but up until that point it still ran reliably.  I elected to sell it for parts vs rebuilding the engine which could have yielded another 100k miles fairly easily. 

Just guessing from your age, you've probably been on the job for 5-6 years.  The job is probably still pretty interesting and promotions/raises fairly routine, but the desire to get a nicer car might be the first hint that you are starting to get tired and/or bored with the job.  I've watched my cohort work hard to get ahead and then proceed to chase their tails by buying anything and everything in sight trying to make themselves happy during the limited time they have outside work. It works for a while but they are always after the next "hit", and they love nothing more than watching you do the same to validate their own behavior.  The biggest "luxury" you can buy yourself is the ability to walk from a job when it no longer meets your needs vs being locked in because you spent your money on "stuff" along the way.   

Fishindude

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #26 on: December 29, 2015, 01:06:16 PM »
To give you a little perspective on how long an automobile should last.   My business owns a fleet of approx. (15) Ford F-150 and F-250 pickups.   They are well maintained, serviced and cleaned regularly, and run down the highway week in and week out in all types of weather including snow, slush, salt, etc. loaded with men and tools.  Most go to an employees home each night / weekend and sit outdoors, rarely garaged.

We typically get about 250,000 miles or ten years out of these vehicles.  Routine maintenance and repair items include; oil changes, tires, wipers, radiator and transmission flush, brakes, etc.   Major repairs such as transmission, engine, etc. are rare.

After all of this use, they still look pretty good and we sell them for $3-4000 when we are done with them.
Modern vehicles will last a long time if well cared for.

frugaliknowit

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #27 on: December 29, 2015, 01:08:08 PM »
Forget what others think about your car.  Keep it and enjoy the relative wealth.

JLee

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #28 on: December 29, 2015, 01:15:04 PM »
@jays, I work at a bank and no it's not important that I have a nice car as a function of my job. I just thought it would be nicer to be in something a bit more comfortable. Yes I know it's a luxury.

Honestly I'm 75% sure I won't be getting a new car anytime soon but what do you think about the 10 year or 100K mark to change for a Honda Civic? At that point I'm really not sure because of the rising potential for costs of upkeep. I have been fortunate so far and there haven't been any issues so far aside from regular maintenance on the car. There are starting to be a few cosmetic blemishes developing because I have to park outside which I'm sure will worsen by that time (but yes I understand those won't mechanically effect the car) but I have to draw the line somewhere.

The last car I bought was $6k, model year 2006, and had 126k on it. Yours is good for another decade or longer.

The last vehicle I sold was a '99 Tacoma with almost 283k miles. I still could've kept it but I wanted something different...I sold it for $1000 more than I paid two years prior.

Ok ok, I won't get a new car. I get it, bad idea. I get these phases sometimes and recently it's been happening with more frequency that I think about the car. I'll probably have this talk again at 10 year/100K miles and probably be laughed out the forum, again.

Anyway, anyone know what type of preventative maintenance I should be taking at 60K? So far in the life of the car I've just done regular oil changes, brakes, and tires. I did have the transmission and brake fluids flushed and replaced at 50K.

+1 to others..just do what the manual recommends.

I would ask the people you know how much they love their new car once they have it.  I agree that the euphoria only lasts a few days.  After awhile, you are used to it and it's the same as the Honda.

I upgraded my Corolla for a gorgeous luxury car a few years ago.  Within days that new car feeling was gone and as soon as I took the new car in for maintenance the first time, I wanted my Corolla back.  I had a buddy who worked for Toyota and would change my brakes for 5 bucks if I bought the parts.  Yes, FIVE BUCKS.  They were so easy to change.  New fancy car....NOT FIVE BUCKS.

And I'm a car person too.

I'm a car person as well. It's funny - I have no desire to own a new car. I'm absolutely thrilled with mine (2006 Mazdaspeed6) and honestly can't think of anything I would rather have right now. It's fast enough, it's fun to drive, it was cheap ($6k)...it does everything I want it to do. Would a new WRX be fun? Yup.  Would I enjoy it more than mine? Probably not..and I'd be more worried about people bumping into me in parking lots, I'd be paying more for insurance/registration, and I'd have the constant new-car-depreciation hanging over my head every time I think about it.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2015, 01:19:57 PM by JLee »

TomTX

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #29 on: December 29, 2015, 01:20:03 PM »
This was an ego/social purchase question.

You work at a bank. Money should mean a lot there. Completely max out your 401k and IRA.  That should be almost untouchably impressive. :D


Giro

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #30 on: December 29, 2015, 02:19:03 PM »
This was an ego/social purchase question.

You work at a bank. Money should mean a lot there. Completely max out your 401k and IRA.  That should be almost untouchably impressive. :D

This.  Next time you want to compare yourself to others, compare investment account balances. 


Jack

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #31 on: December 29, 2015, 03:42:13 PM »
I'm a car person as well... Would a new WRX be fun? Yup.  Would I enjoy it more than mine? Probably not..and I'd be more worried about people bumping into me in parking lots, I'd be paying more for insurance/registration, and I'd have the constant new-car-depreciation hanging over my head every time I think about it.

This is a good point. My '90 Miata is more fun than just about any other car, and insurance costs me $79 per six months. Any other similarly-fun car would cost double, triple, or even more to insure... and that's before considering the fact that anything with a loan would require full coverage!

shadowmoss

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #32 on: December 30, 2015, 09:56:45 AM »
This thread was on my mind on Monday when I stepped into a Chevy dealership to trade my 2008 Jeep.  I was trading because the Jeep is not a good fit with my life now.  I bought it new, paid it off early and had the clean title in my pocket.

I walked in, basically said I want a Chevy Spark, stick shift and oh, I happen to have the title to my Jeep out there in my pocket.  I figured the salesman would about wet himself because I didn't say how much I was willing to pay.  Turns out, new Chevy Sparks with manual transmissions are basically not easy to come by.  I ended up with a 2014 Mazda3.  I again remembered this thread and thought, ok, I did the proper Mustachian thing after all.

I was after first, another stick shift, better gas mileage, and 4 door comfortable enough to carry 4 adults and hopefully seats that fold down so I can sleep (live if necessary?) in the car.  Got all I really wanted.  Turns out I apparently ended up with a cool car as well.  Not quite, but almost even trade, and the difference, of course, put on my Southwest credit card for the points.  It will be paid off appropriately.

Jack

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #33 on: December 30, 2015, 06:29:43 PM »
This thread was on my mind on Monday when I stepped into a Chevy dealership to trade my 2008 Jeep.... I ended up with a 2014 Mazda3.  I again remembered this thread and thought, ok, I did the proper Mustachian thing after all.

A 2008 Jeep what? If it was a Wrangler, I'd expect it to be worth more than a 2014 Mazda3. It would have been better if you'd done private-party sales; you'd probably walk away with the mustachian car and cash in your pocket instead of owing. Not to mention, 2014 is too new: you should have gone for a Mazda3 that was older than that (not so old that it was still named "Protege," but older than 2014).

I rate your decision 3 mustaches out of 5 -- not bad, but not great.

shadowmoss

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Re: Timing the purchase of a new car
« Reply #34 on: December 30, 2015, 07:38:03 PM »
shoulda coulda woulda.  I'm not perfect and I was paralyzed for 2 months after I decided to trade it in on something just because any move except the absolute perfect one (as defined by whoever is the one talking to me at the time) is the wrong one 'cause I coulda done this other thing that would have been better.  I decided to do the best I could.  I like the car, it meets my criteria, and yes, it was a Jeep Wrangler X 2 door base model with 85K miles.  I'm good.  Something done beats being paralyzed and doing nothing because something might not be perfect.