Author Topic: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers  (Read 12196 times)

onemorebike

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Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« on: December 30, 2014, 10:33:22 PM »
Being a part of the MMM community, and living the way we do, I've become much more comfortable talking about finances, ER, FI, etc with friends. We are amateurs in the realm of becoming FIRE but talk about it frequently with those that we think  are receptive (and perhaps with those that aren't). Today I got this response from a friend via the interwebs: "you sound obsessive these days about the saving and retiring early and not working thing... seems like those forums are convincing you."

This particular friend is "obsessive" about exercise, so I made the comparison of her regular exercise to my thought/understanding of fiscal responsibility around FIRE. Not necessarily the center of my existence but something that I was constantly developing and getting better at.

To me, her comment sounded super negative, but maybe I'm reading it wrong. I responded pretty re-actively to the comment, but didn't lash out. How would you (or do you) respond to this sort of criticism about MMM lifestyle?

auntie_betty

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2014, 11:13:48 PM »

To me, her comment sounded super negative, but maybe I'm reading it wrong. I responded pretty re-actively to the comment, but didn't lash out. How would you (or do you) respond to this sort of criticism about MMM lifestyle?
Find new friends?

Seriously, if you are talking about it too much to people who just don't 'get it' it's probably boring them, in the same way your friend talking obsessively about exercise can be boring. You've stated your case so I'd let it be - you can give occasional updates when you hit milestones and that may open them up to asking questions etc.

Try to find some like minded people in real life you can discuss with - I've met a few re UK forums and it is so refreshing to talk to people who 'get it' and share the same goals. Also you can talk about progress without sounding as if you're boasting etc. Maybe look out for people near you on here? Or just witter away on here where you know you'll be understood :)

Eric

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2014, 01:23:37 AM »
Today I got this response from a friend via the interwebs: "you sound obsessive these days about the saving and retiring early and not working thing... seems like those forums are convincing you."

I'm really excited about it!  But we can talk about ______ if you're not interested.

onemorebike

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2014, 04:35:32 AM »
The conversation came up as my wife and are selling our home and my friend was asking how the showings were going. I mentioned that my realtor (a mutual friend) said if I dropped the price 10-15k we'd sell it tomorrow. (I listed a tad high with some extra time to see if the market would hold it) I followed up by saying something to the effect of, yeah but that money could support 5 months of us living without work during our transition/move back to minnesota.

When I asked her if she was being negative about it, she said "Not being negative. You are being smart. But lots of focus on saving money. I just think balance is good. Being present and comfortable. But that is me."

I think what irked me was the follow up comment that makes me sound like i'm imbalanced, not present, and not comfortable. This is a person who has been a close friend for many years.

odput

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2014, 06:16:07 AM »
That is a typical reply of someone who thinks you are sacrificing your present to get to your future goal.  Some people honestly just can't get their heads around the concept of enough.  Not necessarily a bad remark, but they just don't get that you are not suffering at all by doing this.  I wouldn't think this reaction is meant to slight you at all, although I would probably try to find some other things to talk about with this particular friend.

DoNorth

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2014, 06:32:52 AM »
We've given a few family/friends a prelude of what we're going to do with regards to FIRE, but generally continue to go about it quietly.  The massive amount of personal finance and early retirement books laying around my house are probably a giveaway though. 

I suppose its one thing to be talking about FIRE all the time before you've done it and another thing to actually be FIRE talking about how great it is.  Most people can't fathom a monetary goal beyond a year or two; so I suppose its hard for people to relate.  Even my wife was having a hard time with working toward FIRE in 2-3 years, although when i said we could push it up to a year from now if we worked really hard at it, she became very motivated.  I just try to make my plugs in subtle ways...."yeah, our phone bills were getting a bit high so we switched to Republic" or "we weren't watching cable that much so we switch to just internet".  We also focus on explaining the non-monetary aspects like just having more time together as a family and no one has ever argued with that.

DeltaBond

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2014, 06:39:05 AM »
Her comment wasn't as much negative as it was ignorant.  Some people aren't raised, like I was, by a Swiss dad who was all about saving.  Sounds like not everyone here was raised by frugal parents, but they've got on board somehow.

One thing about her exercise obsession, that is also an investment for the future.  In retirement/old age, its nice to be healthy.... if you want to bridge that gap for her.  It really opened my eyes where I work, doing claims for pension benefits for retired unworking people who literally had no money for food, it was insane.

JLee

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2014, 06:40:46 AM »
That is a typical reply of someone who thinks you are sacrificing your present to get to your future goal.  Some people honestly just can't get their heads around the concept of enough.  Not necessarily a bad remark, but they just don't get that you are not suffering at all by doing this.  I wouldn't think this reaction is meant to slight you at all, although I would probably try to find some other things to talk about with this particular friend.

I had the same impression of the FI concept presented by this site, primarily because of the attitude/writing style presented in the blog posts. If I were to bike everywhere and drive old boring cars when I had to drive, I would be suffering immensely (the afflictions of "Car-guy-ness"). So..given my initial impressions, I could absolutely see how someone would think someone's putting themselves in a worse place now for a better future later.

I'd rather work for a few more years and enjoy my Baja offroad trips in the meantime. To each their own, ya? :)

Le Barbu

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2014, 06:46:55 AM »
Normal people are so brainwashed these days by TV show, ad., and even news (low information diet anyone?)...

At the moment you switch to Mustachian way of life, there is such a clash between you and "them"! Testerday, everyone who lunch at the office were willing to drive across town (5 miles, small town!) to grab a ICE CREAM ! Fuck, it was 0 Fahrenheit and the place they went is at least 5$+ for a single cone! I just said "no thank" and went out for a 25 minutes walk.

Now, do you think they would get anythink about FI? They wont believe...

DeltaBond

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2014, 06:46:55 AM »
That is a typical reply of someone who thinks you are sacrificing your present to get to your future goal.  Some people honestly just can't get their heads around the concept of enough.  Not necessarily a bad remark, but they just don't get that you are not suffering at all by doing this.  I wouldn't think this reaction is meant to slight you at all, although I would probably try to find some other things to talk about with this particular friend.

I had the same impression of the FI concept presented by this site, primarily because of the attitude/writing style presented in the blog posts. If I were to bike everywhere and drive old boring cars when I had to drive, I would be suffering immensely (the afflictions of "Car-guy-ness"). So..given my initial impressions, I could absolutely see how someone would think someone's putting themselves in a worse place now for a better future later.

I'd rather work for a few more years and enjoy my Baja offroad trips in the meantime. To each their own, ya? :)

I think this is fair, JLee, and I agree.  I'm saving quite a bit, but not every single penny.  Its a balance, and if you're cool with working a little longer to enjoy a hobby that costs a little bit, then that's cool.  I don't necessarily think it needs to be every person's goal to stop working the earliest date possible... for some, it is, that's one of their hobbies to plan that out and see it through.  If you have something you love that costs you a little bit, don't get that up, just save what you can and you'll probably do great anyway - better than a lot of people, at least.

EDSMedS

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #10 on: December 31, 2014, 08:20:57 AM »
I LOVE talking about frugality with nonbelievers, but I am a contrarian by nature and gain pleasure from challenging popular viewpoints and prompting thoughtfulness, whether I agree or not with my own critique, and often especially if I disagree, lol.

A few thoughts:
- sometimes a seed grows better than a plant, aka if they see how happy this is making you, how calm, how secure, they will think of you and your strategies in their own moments of sorrow, anxiety, and insecurity.  A little truth can grow tall.
- you are now in the minority opinion (WELCOME!) and will find that the majority will take pleasure in tearing you apart, especially if they can make you emotional and sad.
- you were right to try to speak to your exercisey friend from her perspective.  Frugality is already a stretch.  Aim to hear the base concerns of your critics and speak to those.
- "the wave" is a really simple metaphor for finances that MMM likes to discuss (http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2013/05/25/which-part-of-the-money-wave-do-you-surf/); you can plan ahead, try to catch up, or be smashed!  No matter what, money is an indivisible element of modern living.

Best of luck!

DeltaBond

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #11 on: December 31, 2014, 08:53:10 AM »
I LOVE talking about frugality with nonbelievers, but I am a contrarian by nature and gain pleasure from challenging popular viewpoints and prompting thoughtfulness, whether I agree or not with my own critique, and often especially if I disagree, lol.

LOL, there's a word for that ;)

Imustacheyouaquestion

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #12 on: December 31, 2014, 09:03:15 AM »
How would you (or do you) respond to this sort of criticism about MMM lifestyle?

It helps to develop a thick skin for all types of criticism about any aspect of your lifestyle.

Honestly, I don't really see a need to respond to criticism. When you retire early, they'll credit your ability to do so to factors such as "getting lucky in the stock market" or "not having a huge mortgage left to pay," without realizing that such factors are in fact the result of determined planning and dedicated effort. Who cares?

Numbers Man

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #13 on: December 31, 2014, 09:22:58 AM »
Being a part of the MMM community, and living the way we do, I've become much more comfortable talking about finances, ER, FI, etc with friends. We are amateurs in the realm of becoming FIRE but talk about it frequently with those that we think  are receptive (and perhaps with those that aren't). Today I got this response from a friend via the interwebs: "you sound obsessive these days about the saving and retiring early and not working thing... seems like those forums are convincing you."

This particular friend is "obsessive" about exercise, so I made the comparison of her regular exercise to my thought/understanding of fiscal responsibility around FIRE. Not necessarily the center of my existence but something that I was constantly developing and getting better at.

To me, her comment sounded super negative, but maybe I'm reading it wrong. I responded pretty re-actively to the comment, but didn't lash out. How would you (or do you) respond to this sort of criticism about MMM lifestyle?

I don't see your friend's response as a big deal. Your friend is starting a dialogue with you. People are not going to instantly nod their heads and jump for joy when first trying to grasp a new concept (new concept to them).

sheepstache

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #14 on: December 31, 2014, 09:50:21 AM »

When I asked her if she was being negative about it, she said "Not being negative. You are being smart. But lots of focus on saving money. I just think balance is good. Being present and comfortable. But that is me."

I think what irked me was the follow up comment that makes me sound like i'm imbalanced, not present, and not comfortable.

Yeah I agree, that would feel like a jab to me. Which is not to say that's how it was intended.

I think your analogy to her exercise habit is smart.

Her response may simply be her way of trying to politely let you know you're boring her. Sort of like if she talked too much about exercise, you might get bored. Just because it's interesting to her, doesn't make it interesting conversation, something we have to bear in mind with any topic. Going forward, I would just test how and how much you can talk about it while paying careful attention to her reactions.

RapmasterD

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #15 on: December 31, 2014, 11:54:45 AM »
How would you (or do you) respond to this sort of criticism about MMM lifestyle?

It helps to develop a thick skin for all types of criticism about any aspect of your lifestyle.

Honestly, I don't really see a need to respond to criticism. When you retire early, they'll credit your ability to do so to factors such as "getting lucky in the stock market" or "not having a huge mortgage left to pay," without realizing that such factors are in fact the result of determined planning and dedicated effort. Who cares?

...Or "receiving an inheritance," even if it only equals 7% of your total liquid net worth, and you received it after you decided to RE.

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #16 on: December 31, 2014, 12:12:12 PM »
Money is an incredibly sensitive subject to a lot of people.  I tried to convince a few peers in my early 20's to hold off on the lifestyle inflation, never with a good reaction, so I gave up.  Best to fly under the radar and blend in.  Now that I am telling friends about my plans, a few have asked for advice, but I am sure there is some jealousy, too.  I try not to talk about it too much, but it is hard.  One of my best friends that knew about my plan from the beginning simply said, "Doesn't surprise me, you have talked about it forever" and that was it.  No high fives, no hell yeahs, just business as usual. 

This FIRE thing is awesome, but it really throws most people through a loop. When you talk about it, many people probably feel as if they are getting a lecture, a sales pitch, or you are bragging.  If someone feels that way there is no way to win.   

onemorebike

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #17 on: December 31, 2014, 12:20:13 PM »
This FIRE thing is awesome, but it really throws most people through a loop. When you talk about it, many people probably feel as if they are getting a lecture, a sales pitch, or you are bragging.  If someone feels that way there is no way to win.

This is likely it. Combined with a little bit of the above reference to conversations about money. This blog/forum has really changed my perception about discussing money, I think everyone should. There is much learning to do even when talking about failures. (yet, I also understand why it is so taboo!) I'm trying to talk to a close friend about what's important to me - friends do this, I'm told - not brag or lecture. But, I see how this is perceived that way.

That all said, I'm not trying to win, I'm wondering why she'd be such a snot about it.

Mr.Chipper77

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #18 on: December 31, 2014, 12:34:14 PM »
A lot of times people respond because they are ignorant or jealous because they cant make such a commitment. I found more and more myself moving away from such people but also find myself gravitated to others.  Sounds like in this case maybe not such a good friendship but time will tell.

EDSMedS

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #19 on: December 31, 2014, 12:44:10 PM »
This FIRE thing is awesome, but it really throws most people through a loop. When you talk about it, many people probably feel as if they are getting a lecture, a sales pitch, or you are bragging.  If someone feels that way there is no way to win.

This is likely it. Combined with a little bit of the above reference to conversations about money. This blog/forum has really changed my perception about discussing money, I think everyone should. There is much learning to do even when talking about failures. (yet, I also understand why it is so taboo!) I'm trying to talk to a close friend about what's important to me - friends do this, I'm told - not brag or lecture. But, I see how this is perceived that way.

That all said, I'm not trying to win, I'm wondering why she'd be such a snot about it.

Taboo is right!  This taboo has functioned to prevent uprisings within the proletariat.  Who really wants to be reminded of their own helplessness and relative status?  However, as MMM has pointed out, we are in a new age where gaming the system is possible.  Ignoring this taboo can allow others to game just as well!  However, there are still certain spaces that this taboo is strong, specifically the workplace and especially if there is stratified income.

MooseOutFront

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #20 on: December 31, 2014, 07:28:06 PM »
- sometimes a seed grows better than a plant, aka if they see how happy this is making you, how calm, how secure, they will think of you and your strategies in their own moments of sorrow, anxiety, and insecurity.  A little truth can grow tall.
wise words. the only people who inquire with me about financial matters seem to notice the qualities you mention in me.

Eric

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #21 on: December 31, 2014, 08:12:42 PM »
I had the same impression of the FI concept presented by this site, primarily because of the attitude/writing style presented in the blog posts. If I were to bike everywhere and drive old boring cars when I had to drive, I would be suffering immensely (the afflictions of "Car-guy-ness").

Ummm, have you tried it?  Or are you just dismissing it based on preconceived notions?  Because biking really is awesome, so I hope you at least try it out for an extended period.

PencilThinMust

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #22 on: January 01, 2015, 11:18:25 AM »
I feel bad for nonbelievers..  My mother in-law, sister in-law and brother in-law are teachers and are handcuffed by their pensions.  They don't believe in FIRE, even after I go over the facts.  They think I am a bit crazy.  They will regret it when my wife and I (teachers) retire minimally 12 years before them.  I

TerriM

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #23 on: January 01, 2015, 11:37:03 AM »
To me, her comment sounded super negative, but maybe I'm reading it wrong. I responded pretty re-actively to the comment, but didn't lash out. How would you (or do you) respond to this sort of criticism about MMM lifestyle?

Two thoughts:
1.  Email and tone is easily misread, and people use words that they may later regret the meaning of.

2.  Seems to me that she's trying to figure out if you're serious.  I didn't see that as negative as much as "You seem like this is for real.  Is it?"  So a positive response of "Yes, this is totally the way to go for us--I'm so glad we found the forums, and we're feeling so much more positive about our life, our goals, and our finances!  I love the way it feels." 

Hey It's Me

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #24 on: May 09, 2015, 05:36:21 AM »
That is a typical reply of someone who thinks you are sacrificing your present to get to your future goal.  Some people honestly just can't get their heads around the concept of enough.  Not necessarily a bad remark, but they just don't get that you are not suffering at all by doing this.  I wouldn't think this reaction is meant to slight you at all, although I would probably try to find some other things to talk about with this particular friend.

I had the same impression of the FI concept presented by this site, primarily because of the attitude/writing style presented in the blog posts. If I were to bike everywhere and drive old boring cars when I had to drive, I would be suffering immensely (the afflictions of "Car-guy-ness"). So..given my initial impressions, I could absolutely see how someone would think someone's putting themselves in a worse place now for a better future later.

I'd rather work for a few more years and enjoy my Baja offroad trips in the meantime. To each their own, ya? :)

I think this is fair, JLee, and I agree.  I'm saving quite a bit, but not every single penny.  Its a balance, and if you're cool with working a little longer to enjoy a hobby that costs a little bit, then that's cool.  I don't necessarily think it needs to be every person's goal to stop working the earliest date possible... for some, it is, that's one of their hobbies to plan that out and see it through.  If you have something you love that costs you a little bit, don't get that up, just save what you can and you'll probably do great anyway - better than a lot of people, at least.

Gonna be honest, I LOVE lattes. They're my guilty pleasure. I used to buy the $3.50 ones from a big chain, but discovered the $5 ones from a local shop. Now I'm buying $5 lattes every day, and holey moley - they are good!

The thing is, I beat myself up for it the first few times, but I realize that I'm saving an unholey amount of my income, don't spend much money on eating out, have no car, so I'm doing okay. I'm going to enjoy my $5 lattes every time I drink them.

MLKnits

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #25 on: May 09, 2015, 06:04:57 AM »
Gonna be honest, I LOVE lattes. They're my guilty pleasure. I used to buy the $3.50 ones from a big chain, but discovered the $5 ones from a local shop. Now I'm buying $5 lattes every day, and holey moley - they are good!

The thing is, I beat myself up for it the first few times, but I realize that I'm saving an unholey amount of my income, don't spend much money on eating out, have no car, so I'm doing okay. I'm going to enjoy my $5 lattes every time I drink them.

Nothing wrong with lattes, but why not make your own? Even if you went whole-hog and bought an espresso machine and a milk frother, you'd still be hugely beating your cost at the $5/day rate. Or the much more affordable version: http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-a-latte-without-an-espresso-machine-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-211090

Honestly, even if your savings rate were 85%, five bucks a day for coffee and milk is pretty face-punch territory. And I say that as a coffee addict (with a $15 coffee machine that works beautifully every time).

The_path_less_taken

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #26 on: May 09, 2015, 06:10:47 AM »


When I asked her if she was being negative about it, she said "Not being negative. You are being smart. But lots of focus on saving money. I just think balance is good. Being present and comfortable. But that is me."

I think what irked me was the follow up comment that makes me sound like i'm imbalanced, not present, and not comfortable. This is a person who has been a close friend for many years.



Hard to read tone on the net but...that woulda raised my hackles a bit too.

I had someone I thought was a friend for years do something similar and we sort of never got over it: probably not very grown up, on my part. But if you feel that someone doesn't "get" you...it can be difficult. I personally have a very "live and let live" philosophy, but if I think someone is dissing me I can get a bit prickly about it.

How I deal with it now is I mention the website. And gush about "there are people retiring in their 20's...how cool is THAT?" "there are people who reduce their spending by half and double their savings!!!".

If their eyes don't light up...I rarely bring it up again. There's a woman at work who just went thru a bankruptcy and lost her home. Her husband just went on disability, and she complains about the crap wages/commissions we make. Her credit is "not great".

They just bought a new Toyota Tacoma last week, fully financed.

We won't be talking money much from here on out.

dcheesi

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #27 on: May 09, 2015, 06:28:22 AM »
I feel bad for nonbelievers..  My mother in-law, sister in-law and brother in-law are teachers and are handcuffed by their pensions.  They don't believe in FIRE, even after I go over the facts.  They think I am a bit crazy.  They will regret it when my wife and I (teachers) retire minimally 12 years before them.  I
I don't know their personal situation, but most teachers where I am get a guaranteed pension after 30 years on the job. Meanwhile they get paid crap while they're working, which makes it harder to save a nest egg of their own. Essentially they're trading a lower standard of living now for a guaranteed retirement income that usually starts in their mid-fifties (which is still "early" to most people).

It's not that different from the voluntary savings tradeoff that mustachians make, really.  Except that in their case the "savings" are enforced (the money that funds their pensions is theoretically part of their comoensation) and they have to do the full 30 to get that pension, rather the pan choosing their own RE date.

Hey It's Me

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #28 on: May 09, 2015, 09:24:04 PM »
Gonna be honest, I LOVE lattes. They're my guilty pleasure. I used to buy the $3.50 ones from a big chain, but discovered the $5 ones from a local shop. Now I'm buying $5 lattes every day, and holey moley - they are good!

The thing is, I beat myself up for it the first few times, but I realize that I'm saving an unholey amount of my income, don't spend much money on eating out, have no car, so I'm doing okay. I'm going to enjoy my $5 lattes every time I drink them.

Nothing wrong with lattes, but why not make your own? Even if you went whole-hog and bought an espresso machine and a milk frother, you'd still be hugely beating your cost at the $5/day rate. Or the much more affordable version: http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-a-latte-without-an-espresso-machine-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-211090

Honestly, even if your savings rate were 85%, five bucks a day for coffee and milk is pretty face-punch territory. And I say that as a coffee addict (with a $15 coffee machine that works beautifully every time).

You know what, I'm going to try this and get back to you. Thank you :)

I don't have a coffee machine at home (honestly, only drink instant Folger's coffee at home). Can you recommend a frugal coffee machine that kicks ass?
« Last Edit: May 09, 2015, 09:26:48 PM by moe_rants »

Ricky

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #29 on: May 09, 2015, 10:22:41 PM »

When I asked her if she was being negative about it, she said "Not being negative. You are being smart. But lots of focus on saving money. I just think balance is good. Being present and comfortable. But that is me."


I actually really appreciate and like that answer. It could have gone much worse. It's easy to get obsessive over this stuff and can be a little unhealthy if you become over concerned with your plans. Living in the moment doesn't mean you have to blow all your money, it just means not worrying about things so much.

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #30 on: May 11, 2015, 12:22:27 PM »

You know what, I'm going to try this and get back to you. Thank you :)

I don't have a coffee machine at home (honestly, only drink instant Folger's coffee at home). Can you recommend a frugal coffee machine that kicks ass?

A used one from garage sale/Goodwill.  I can't remember where I bought mine but it works OK.  Of course, now that I have it I drink tea and home and free coffee with hot chocolate in it at work.  So I have a dusty espresso maker.


AJ

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #31 on: May 11, 2015, 01:12:19 PM »
I don't have a coffee machine at home (honestly, only drink instant Folger's coffee at home). Can you recommend a frugal coffee machine that kicks ass?

I brew my coffee in my teapot. Just add hot water and coffee, let steep 5 minutes, strain like tea and let the mix settle for a minute (to let any tiny grounds that make it through the strainer sink to the bottom). It's like a hacky french press. As I type this I realize I don't even need the teapot - a mason jar would work fine to hold the coffee while it steeps.

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #32 on: May 11, 2015, 01:46:49 PM »
This shit right here ain't no religion, so maybe stop trying to be evangelical and just live your life.

vagon

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #33 on: May 11, 2015, 07:25:11 PM »
This shit right here ain't no religion, so maybe stop trying to be evangelical and just live your life.

Heathen! Sacrilege!

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #34 on: May 11, 2015, 07:42:44 PM »
I don't have a coffee machine at home (honestly, only drink instant Folger's coffee at home). Can you recommend a frugal coffee machine that kicks ass?

I brew my coffee in my teapot. Just add hot water and coffee, let steep 5 minutes, strain like tea and let the mix settle for a minute (to let any tiny grounds that make it through the strainer sink to the bottom). It's like a hacky french press. As I type this I realize I don't even need the teapot - a mason jar would work fine to hold the coffee while it steeps.

Or try cold brew! I've done this a couple of times and it is awesome! But the first time I had too much before bed and I was freakin' wired!

Faraday

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #35 on: May 11, 2015, 09:58:24 PM »
Being a part of the MMM community, and living the way we do, I've become much more comfortable talking about finances, ER, FI, etc with friends. We are amateurs in the realm of becoming FIRE but talk about it frequently with those that we think  are receptive (and perhaps with those that aren't). Today I got this response from a friend via the interwebs: "you sound obsessive these days about the saving and retiring early and not working thing... seems like those forums are convincing you."
...

It's a credit to your friend that the conversation was even that intelligent - I've experienced much worse when I've brought up frugal, efficient living.

DW and I have been living subversive lives in two ways: first, frugalism in the MMM context, second, the Keto Lifestyle. I've noticed that when people ask me about "losing weight" (my most visible subversion), they aren't interested in actually practicing what I do, they just want some sound bites and some ways they can resolve, themselves, to lose weight. It's just entertainment to them - I become their "dancing bear".

This has made me militant in my beliefs.  I speak to "non-subversives" using language that specifically calls out the limitations and error in what they believe. I need them to know that my beliefs and lifestyle are successful and I'm totally committed to that success. I don't do the frugal/keto lifestyle to be anyone else's entertainment. I do it to be "bi-winning", as one infamous dude once said. :-)

« Last Edit: May 12, 2015, 05:34:31 AM by mefla »

trailrated

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #36 on: May 11, 2015, 10:54:43 PM »
This shit right here ain't no religion, so maybe stop trying to be evangelical and just live your life.

Heathen! Sacrilege!

I just laughed my ass off at that... thank you :)

Faraday

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Re: Talking about Mustachianism with Nonbelievers
« Reply #37 on: May 12, 2015, 05:38:53 AM »
This shit right here ain't no religion, so maybe stop trying to be evangelical and just live your life.

« Last Edit: May 12, 2015, 05:40:26 AM by mefla »