Author Topic: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets  (Read 36965 times)

totoro

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #50 on: January 31, 2015, 01:52:37 PM »
I disagree with that statement.   Giving up a pet does not mean you did not love them or they are unwanted.  Not ensuring a successful rehoming is less understandable on my part.  I would think that the decision to rehome is pretty stressful.  We had circumstances that made it difficult to keep our dog.  Luckily, we were able to find a family to share our pet with us and it has worked out wonderfully for us all.


Cassie

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #51 on: January 31, 2015, 01:58:20 PM »
Our local humane society is much like Blonde Lawyers.  We do not euthanize unless the animal is aggressive. When we are full we work with other local rescue groups to take animals until we have space & we do the same for them.  WE also have many foster homes. Sometimes it takes 2 years for a cat to get adopted but we certainly do not send them somewhere else to be killed.  I agree that pets are for life except if you truly are horribly allergic or your child is etc. I agree that you don't give up your kid when you have one & a pet should not be any different.  Our HS gives food to people that can't afford to buy it so they can keep their animals.  We drove halfway across the country to pick up my son's old, big dog because he was traveling so much for work that is was not fair for the dog.  Also I am allergic to him which is why my other dogs have hair & not fur because they don't bother my allergies. In just under a year he had a few medical problems that cost $3000.  He has been worth every dime.  A pit in a park started to attack me & Noki got between the dog & I & fought like crazy until the pit's owner came.  I would have been really hurt without him-priceless!!

aetherie

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #52 on: January 31, 2015, 02:03:07 PM »
Thank you totoro, I was going to say the same thing. Arebelspy is obviously trying to do the right thing for his cats, comes here to ask for help, and people jump down his throat saying he must have never loved them? I thought this community was more open-minded than that. Judging and piling on the guilt is not helpful.

Cassie

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #53 on: February 01, 2015, 05:26:39 PM »
I am sure that is why he did not state the reason because if it was not incredible it would be attacked.  I gave good advice on some options but yes I am a huge animal lover & barring extreme allergy, death or going into a nursing home I think people once they commit to a pet should finish the commitment.   I really wish more people would think through the possibilities before adopting because it is hard on a animal to be rehomed or go to a shelter.  It causes major anxiety that may last there entire lives.

totoro

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #54 on: February 01, 2015, 09:30:35 PM »
There are other reasons I would find acceptable such as:

1. spouse is pregnant, immune-compromised and extremely worried about toxoplasmosis and doctor has advised against keeping cats.  Yes, I know there are ways around this but I don't put a pet above a child's health against medical advice; and,
2. prolonged illness/poverty/homelessness.

While I agree rehoming can be anxiety-provoking for a pet, it is possible.  We've adopted animals who thrived, as many others can attest to. 

If I had to give up a pet I would do everything in my power to make sure they had a good home, including through providing financial support.  My parents and I have agreed to take each others pets if need be.



starbuck

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #55 on: February 02, 2015, 05:19:04 AM »
Thank you totoro, I was going to say the same thing. Arebelspy is obviously trying to do the right thing for his cats, comes here to ask for help, and people jump down his throat saying he must have never loved them? I thought this community was more open-minded than that. Judging and piling on the guilt is not helpful.

Seconded. Obviously he cares about his animals, otherwise he could just ditch them at the door of an animal shelter, which unfortunately happens. I've worked in animal rescue for 6 years now, and I totally understand people needing to rehome a pet. Usually there are a lot of tears involved. All that's important is that it's done responsibly, which he is doing.

I am assuming that the rehoming is necessary due to the impending long term overseas travel that him and his spouse are planning for when they leave their jobs.

Good luck, ARS! Maybe a friend of a friend via Facebook would be most fruitful if area shelters have countdown clocks. It sounds like it's much easier up in the northeast. At my shelter, we're not technically 'no-kill' (really aggressive dogs, and pets at the end of their life are euthanized) but any pet we take in gets to stay as long as necessary until they find a new home. Sometimes a no-kill shelter is able to be a no-kill shelter because they have really strict guidelines on what pets the accept (and long wait lists.) My shelter is affiliated with the city, so we get all sorts of characters. And yes, we spend lots on vet care.

MandyM

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #56 on: February 02, 2015, 06:27:45 AM »
Have you been able to find a home or rescue for your cats?

(I have not read the whole thread) I volunteer for a no-kill humane society and run the cat program with 3 others, although not anywhere near you. My thoughts/questions:

It is more difficult to place a pair of adults together, but not impossible.

Try craigslist, but be very thorough in your evaluation of a potential home. Include a visit to the home.

Try Rescueme.org.

What is your timeline? You may find a shelter that will list your cats on petfinder.com through their organization while the cats remain with you. Would help exposure.

Have your cats been indoor only? Or indoor/outdoor?

Feel free to PM me.

MoneyCat

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #57 on: February 02, 2015, 06:38:16 AM »

Try craigslist, but be very thorough in your evaluation of a potential home. Include a visit to the home.



I cannot stress how bad of an idea it is to list pets on Craigslist.  That's how dog-fighting rings get their "bait" animals.  The dog-fighters send their sweet-looking girlfriends to pick up the dogs and cats and then they are brought home to be killed by the fighting dogs.  Do not list your pets on Craigslist unless you want them to die a gruesome and painful death.

caliq

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #58 on: February 02, 2015, 08:16:42 AM »

Try craigslist, but be very thorough in your evaluation of a potential home. Include a visit to the home.



I cannot stress how bad of an idea it is to list pets on Craigslist.  That's how dog-fighting rings get their "bait" animals.  The dog-fighters send their sweet-looking girlfriends to pick up the dogs and cats and then they are brought home to be killed by the fighting dogs.  Do not list your pets on Craigslist unless you want them to die a gruesome and painful death.

I would imagine that depends on your area? 

I found a sweet, beautiful dog on Craigslist and gave her a great home for about six months, but unfortunately we had to give her to an old friend recently because she started getting into fights with one of my other dogs and none of our behavioral modification tactics were working (and these were 2 100 lb Great Dane females -- I physically cannot separate them and my husband barely could).  She was healthier, happier, and safer here than she was in the home I got her from, and she's at a forever home now with a girl I've known since I was 6 years old. 

The family we got her from asked and received photos of our house, and our other dogs, called my vet to get a reference, etc etc.  We were emailing back and forth for at least a week and a half before I went and picked Rogue up.  If we had lived closer (I made a 1.5 hr one way drive), they would have physically come to my house to 'inspect' it.  They really did their homework and it was obvious they cared about her, but were struggling to provide her a great home (a lot of people get overwhelmed with giant breeds...).

It's kind of insulting to those of us who have taken pets in from Craigslist for you to categorically say that everyone on Craigslist is a dog fighter. 

If you really do your homework on a potential home, you can find a good one on Craigslist. 

totoro

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #59 on: February 02, 2015, 09:38:44 AM »
Try craigslist, but be very thorough in your evaluation of a potential home. Include a visit to the home

I cannot stress how bad of an idea it is to list pets on Craigslist.  That's how dog-fighting rings get their "bait" animals.  The dog-fighters send their sweet-looking girlfriends to pick up the dogs and cats and then they are brought home to be killed by the fighting dogs.  Do not list your pets on Craigslist unless you want them to die a gruesome and painful death.

This is a gross exaggeration. 

Take some steps to check the home circumstances out.  Maybe charge a rehoming fee and also offer period payments for care for a period of time going forward. 

We found our dog-share family on CL.

While it appears that in the US dog fighting is a concern, it is not where I live.  At all.  Nor is medical research.  If these are real risks in the US get whomever is adopting to provide ID and request a follow-up visit with the animal to make sure they are doing well.  I would have no problem with this request.

As far as I am aware medical research animals in Canada are provided through breeders who provide uniform genetic characteristics.  This also sounds terrible and I disagree with it, but your pet is not at risk of being sold for medical research if you sell on CL in Canada.

The biggest risk in rehoming here is that the animal is not well cared for or subsequently given up to a shelter (which, btw, cannot legally provide these animals for medical research to anyone but they can euthanize them).  I believe that these risks can be controlled for somewhat by asking some questions and using good judgment.

Gin1984

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #60 on: February 02, 2015, 11:17:13 AM »
Try craigslist, but be very thorough in your evaluation of a potential home. Include a visit to the home

I cannot stress how bad of an idea it is to list pets on Craigslist.  That's how dog-fighting rings get their "bait" animals.  The dog-fighters send their sweet-looking girlfriends to pick up the dogs and cats and then they are brought home to be killed by the fighting dogs.  Do not list your pets on Craigslist unless you want them to die a gruesome and painful death.

This is a gross exaggeration. 

Take some steps to check the home circumstances out.  Maybe charge a rehoming fee and also offer period payments for care for a period of time going forward. 

We found our dog-share family on CL.

While it appears that in the US dog fighting is a concern, it is not where I live.  At all.  Nor is medical research.  If these are real risks in the US get whomever is adopting to provide ID and request a follow-up visit with the animal to make sure they are doing well.  I would have no problem with this request.

As far as I am aware medical research animals in Canada are provided through breeders who provide uniform genetic characteristics.  This also sounds terrible and I disagree with it, but your pet is not at risk of being sold for medical research if you sell on CL in Canada.

The biggest risk in rehoming here is that the animal is not well cared for or subsequently given up to a shelter (which, btw, cannot legally provide these animals for medical research to anyone but they can euthanize them).  I believe that these risks can be controlled for somewhat by asking some questions and using good judgment.
It is the same in the US.  Dogs and cats are breed the same way for research.

Blonde Lawyer

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #61 on: February 02, 2015, 02:45:52 PM »
There are other reasons I would find acceptable such as:

1. spouse is pregnant, immune-compromised and extremely worried about toxoplasmosis and doctor has advised against keeping cats.  Yes, I know there are ways around this but I don't put a pet above a child's health against medical advice; and,
2. prolonged illness/poverty/homelessness.

While I agree rehoming can be anxiety-provoking for a pet, it is possible.  We've adopted animals who thrived, as many others can attest to. 

If I had to give up a pet I would do everything in my power to make sure they had a good home, including through providing financial support.  My parents and I have agreed to take each others pets if need be.

Number 1 is a really antiquated view and I wouldn't trust a doctor with that opinion.  Most people who grew up with cats are now immune to that disease anyway. You can be tested for the immunities if you are really worried.  The Non pregnant partner can also handle the litter box.  Kids that go to daycare are riddled with disease.  We don't rehome them if we are pregnant do we? Worst case find a 9 month foster but it really is unnecessary.   

totoro

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #62 on: February 02, 2015, 03:47:10 PM »
Yes, maybe a nine-month foster is a good alternative. 

People who grew up with cats are not all immune to toxoplasmosis though.  Nine out of ten expectant mothers in NA are not immune: http://www.pamf.org/serology/brochure.html.  Even with immunity, if you are immune-compromised you can get it.

tariskat

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #63 on: February 02, 2015, 05:53:01 PM »
Apologies if someone said this -- I skipped a lot of kill-shelter talk -- but if you have used the same veterinary place for all the cats' lives, maybe the actual clinic would adopt them if they are really sweet cats, or one of the technicians / vets would.  Everyone at my vet absolutely loves one of my cats, and I think if I had to give him up, they might be willing to keep him as the company cat, so to speak, like you see some places just have pets that wander around in the store or vet clinic and hang out at the front desk.  Or the techs might like them, since they already know the cats - when I have my cats stay at the vet's overnight the techs talk about how he is such a big sweetheart and they let him out and played with him all the time, etc. 

Self-employed-swami

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #64 on: February 02, 2015, 06:21:46 PM »
I have no real advice for you, just that I understand that it isn't an easy decision when you have to give up your fur babies.  I have two gorgeous cats (we've had both since they were kittens) and I can't imagine having to give them away. 

I hope you find a person/family to love them the way you do.

Blonde Lawyer

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #65 on: February 02, 2015, 08:14:40 PM »
Yes, maybe a nine-month foster is a good alternative. 

People who grew up with cats are not all immune to toxoplasmosis though.  Nine out of ten expectant mothers in NA are not immune: http://www.pamf.org/serology/brochure.html.  Even with immunity, if you are immune-compromised you can get it.

Also, indoor only cats rarely get toxioplasmosis.  My other recommendation would be if you feel that strongly about it, don't get a cat if you plan on getting pregnant in the next 20 years.

Cassie

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #66 on: February 03, 2015, 04:50:53 PM »
I agree that the poster is doing the right thing by finding a good home & being willing to pay for his cats care forever if that's what it takes. That could make a difference between the cats finding a home or not. Some people can't afford pets but would love to have one if someone else paid for the care.   I know that many people do not hold my strong view about animals & that is okay.  I really hope that you are able to find them a loving home together.   Take Care:))

Returnoftheyeti

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #67 on: February 03, 2015, 05:37:12 PM »


I am assuming that the rehoming is necessary due to the impending long term overseas travel that him and his spouse are planning for when they leave their jobs.



"because I am selfish and I retired early, I no longer care for my companions that I made a lifetime commitment to"

Nope, not a good reason....


* - Disclaimer, I do not know the OPs reason for wanting to rehome the pet, I am just saying that "wanting to travel" is not a good reason

Cookie78

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #68 on: February 03, 2015, 06:48:35 PM »


I am assuming that the rehoming is necessary due to the impending long term overseas travel that him and his spouse are planning for when they leave their jobs.



"because I am selfish and I retired early, I no longer care for my companions that I made a lifetime commitment to"

Nope, not a good reason....


* - Disclaimer, I do not know the OPs reason for wanting to rehome the pet, I am just saying that "wanting to travel" is not a good reason

Agreed. I do short trips, or I bring my dog. I'm not going anywhere for an extended period of time if he can't come with me. The long term overseas FI travel can wait until he's no longer alive.

Gin1984

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #69 on: February 03, 2015, 08:14:59 PM »


I am assuming that the rehoming is necessary due to the impending long term overseas travel that him and his spouse are planning for when they leave their jobs.



"because I am selfish and I retired early, I no longer care for my companions that I made a lifetime commitment to"

Nope, not a good reason....


* - Disclaimer, I do not know the OPs reason for wanting to rehome the pet, I am just saying that "wanting to travel" is not a good reason
He is WORKING abroad.  And btw that kind of attitude does not help.  He came on here to find a solution.  Complaining you don't think his reason is valid is not helpful.

Cookie78

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #70 on: February 03, 2015, 08:17:10 PM »


I am assuming that the rehoming is necessary due to the impending long term overseas travel that him and his spouse are planning for when they leave their jobs.



"because I am selfish and I retired early, I no longer care for my companions that I made a lifetime commitment to"

Nope, not a good reason....


* - Disclaimer, I do not know the OPs reason for wanting to rehome the pet, I am just saying that "wanting to travel" is not a good reason
He is WORKING abroad.  And btw that kind of attitude does not help.  He came on here to find a solution.  Complaining you don't think his reason is valid is not helpful.

Did you miss the disclaimer?

totoro

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #71 on: February 03, 2015, 08:41:39 PM »
Shutting down people and telling them they have to keep pets on your terms is like preaching abstinence or "just say no" to drugs.  It never works even if you believe in it 100% percent. 

In the real world many people are going to get into situations where they feel they cannot keep their pets.  Here is someone willing to pay for their ongoing care.  Whether you believe their reason (which you do not know) to be valid or not it seems better than average to me.

And attitudes towards animals are culturally varied.  In Korea they eat dogs.  In Canada we raise animals for medical research. The majority eat pig and cows and chickens grown in abysmal concentration camp conditions.  During periods of war or starvation pets get eaten.  In every country I've been to their needs are seen as secondary to human needs by the majority.  Right or wrong, that is reality. 

That doesn't mean there isn't room for personal responsibility and social change, but judgment and guilt seem misplaced here.

arebelspy

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #72 on: February 03, 2015, 09:08:25 PM »
We are indeed planning to travel.  (Overseas.  Extensively.)

If there was a way we could take our cats with us, we absolutely would.  Our plan though is to live in a place for 1-3 months, then move to the next country, live there for a bit, and then move on, and so on and so forth.  We plan to travel the world for years.

What that means for the cats is that they'd go with us, be stuck in quarantine (most places up to four months).  By the time we got them and were moving on (and forced to move on due to visa issues), we'd only have them for a short time, at most, if we even got them at all (they didn't just ship to the next country).  They'd be stuck, alone and scared, in quarantine, for long stretches, over and over.

That's no thing to do to animals.

Our other option is that we keep them.  We don't live our dream of traveling the world, and just stay here in the US for the next decade until they both die.  That is an option we're considering, just because we do love them.  But it is also not ideal, as traveling is our main ER goal, and without it there's not much point of ER for us.  So our considering it is us saying "I guess we can just keep working."  But continuing to work a decade+ past FI  just for the cats also seems a bit silly.

So we're looking into trying to find out how we can find a wonderful new home for them.  It's not what I want to do, but it may be the best of the various options.  If it comes down to it, we'll pay whatever price that entails to make sure they are well cared for.  I have mostly avoided this thread after the initial day of creation, as dealing with this has been very hard for me.  It's hard for me to visit the websites and read about the options without getting emotional.  It's something we're looking into now, way ahead of time (6+ months), to make sure we can find something that we feel comfortable with for them.  If we don't find something, we won't be leaving.

Thank you everyone for your suggestions.

I realize that people will disagree with what we are doing, and that's okay.  You're more than entitled to your opinion that I'm a scumbag.  Sitting here next to my sleeping cats, I'm not sure I disagree with you.
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Returnoftheyeti

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #73 on: February 03, 2015, 11:16:07 PM »
Were you working towards FI 7 years ago?  Did you know that you wanted to travel the world?

If yes, then why did you take on a 17 year commitment? 

If no, when you started your FI goal and plans, did you not consider the pets you had already committed to taking care of? 

Cressida

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #74 on: February 03, 2015, 11:58:23 PM »
This is hard - sorry you're going through it. For what it's worth, although I definitely believe that you're responsible for any pet you adopt, I also think that finding a loving home for that pet still counts as being responsible. As long as you're very sure they'll be well cared for and loved, I don't think all the judgment here is called for.

Sure, pets get attached to their owners. But we recently adopted an elderly cat whose owner had died and so she'd been at the shelter for several months. She was skittish at first, but she's happy with us now. I think the cats will adapt.

aetherie

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #75 on: February 04, 2015, 05:34:03 AM »
This is hard - sorry you're going through it. For what it's worth, although I definitely believe that you're responsible for any pet you adopt, I also think that finding a loving home for that pet still counts as being responsible. As long as you're very sure they'll be well cared for and loved, I don't think all the judgment here is called for.

Sure, pets get attached to their owners. But we recently adopted an elderly cat whose owner had died and so she'd been at the shelter for several months. She was skittish at first, but she's happy with us now. I think the cats will adapt.

+1
You are not a scumbag.

chasesfish

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #76 on: February 04, 2015, 05:45:54 AM »
arebelspy, I think before this is done you'll probably be able to find someone on this forum that'll consider taking them in. 

I'm sorry you haven't been able to find any friends or family that this is a fit for.

rocksinmyhead

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #77 on: February 04, 2015, 06:40:18 AM »
Sure, pets get attached to their owners. But we recently adopted an elderly cat whose owner had died and so she'd been at the shelter for several months. She was skittish at first, but she's happy with us now. I think the cats will adapt.

So true! My mom's dog growing up was one they adopted whose owner had died. Not sure how old she was but she wasn't a puppy. The only really sad thing was that she had this one toy (I think it was a red ball) that came with her from her old home, and when they brought it out she would get really sad... but occasional sad memories aside, she was soooo happy to be in a house with four kids that loved her!

ARS, I'm sorry you're having to figure this out!! I don't think it would be emotionally possible for us to rehome our dogs, unless one of our future kids turns out to be deathly allergic or something (and even then I think my bf would want to rehome the kid first, LOL). But we don't have the passion for world travel that you and your wife do, and I also think dogs might be different than cats (but then I'm a dog person). I hope you find a wonderful home for them that you're comfortable with.

frugalnacho

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #78 on: February 04, 2015, 09:51:21 AM »
Does anyone know of an organization that you can pay to take your pets and they guarantee placement for them?

All of the places I find will do their best, but often are forced to euthanize. 

If we were willing to pay someone to take our pets (and pay for their care), how could I go about finding that?

You want to FIRE your pet?

decembeir

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #79 on: February 04, 2015, 11:07:27 AM »
I thought I remembered in some other posts, Arebelspy, that you and your wife were interested in RVing around the US once you were FIRE... You could likely do those plans with your cats, if RV living was still a contender. That wouldn't solve your problem, as I'm sure you'll want to be out of the US eventually, but perhaps it would buy you time to find a good family for them.  My husband and I are living with our cats in an RV currently, and so far so good! We are going to run into the same issue as you in about five years when we FIRE, as we plan on continuously slow traveling as well and will be unable to take our three cats with us. Luckily, for us, we have parents with whom these cats once lived and should be able to live again once we do start traveling.

In reply to those who think it is misguided to take on a pet without plans to care for it for the pet's lifespan: Of the three cats we have, two have been taken on since we knew of our upcoming plans to travel, so we knew that we would eventually be parted from them. Although in our case we are pretty sure we will have a home for them, I think I still would have taken care of the cats even without a home lined up as there are so many cats that need homes in the US that providing one even for a short time seems better than not at all.

arebelspy

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #80 on: February 04, 2015, 11:12:15 AM »
I thought I remembered in some other posts, Arebelspy, that you and your wife were interested in RVing around the US once you were FIRE... You could likely do those plans with your cats, if RV living was still a contender.

Yes, keeping the cats is one strong reason for RVing, but it wouldn't be in the US - the ACA is pushing us out of the states.  So then we again run into issues with importing animals to other countries and visa things (can't settle long).  It's still something we're considering.

I think for now I may just sign up for another year of working.
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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #81 on: February 04, 2015, 11:13:12 AM »
I thought I remembered in some other posts, Arebelspy, that you and your wife were interested in RVing around the US once you were FIRE... You could likely do those plans with your cats, if RV living was still a contender. That wouldn't solve your problem, as I'm sure you'll want to be out of the US eventually, but perhaps it would buy you time to find a good family for them.  My husband and I are living with our cats in an RV currently, and so far so good! We are going to run into the same issue as you in about five years when we FIRE, as we plan on continuously slow traveling as well and will be unable to take our three cats with us. Luckily, for us, we have parents with whom these cats once lived and should be able to live again once we do start traveling.

In reply to those who think it is misguided to take on a pet without plans to care for it for the pet's lifespan: Of the three cats we have, two have been taken on since we knew of our upcoming plans to travel, so we knew that we would eventually be parted from them. Although in our case we are pretty sure we will have a home for them, I think I still would have taken care of the cats even without a home lined up as there are so many cats that need homes in the US that providing one even for a short time seems better than not at all.

Decembeir, we're planning to take our (small, shy, but thankfully not declawed) cat with us renting an RV when we first retire, as an experiment to start getting her adjusted to travel prior to our plan to retire abroad and take her with us.  Like Arebelspy, we are planning on moving around in retirement, though not likely as often as he (he said they want to move every three months or so, but we're planning on maybe getting residency in a country for a year or two and then moving on).  Can you tell me what issues/challenges you have had traveling with your cats in an RV?  I'm mostly concerned that my little girl, who has not been outside since she was a very, very small kitten, will get loose and get hurt.  Incidentally, this is also one of my concerns with traveling abroad, since most places that we'll be going probably don't have screened windows, as we currently do.  I'm probably too much of a worrier, but she is a very small cat about the size of a 6-7 month old kitten) and I love her so, so much that it freaks me out terribly to imagine her vulnerable to attack by other animals.  I am planning to leash train her (she seems a bit less hysterical than other cats have been when I put a harness on her), but I can't harness her all the time in a house without screened windows.

Cookie78

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #82 on: February 04, 2015, 11:18:11 AM »
I thought I remembered in some other posts, Arebelspy, that you and your wife were interested in RVing around the US once you were FIRE... You could likely do those plans with your cats, if RV living was still a contender.

Yes, keeping the cats is one strong reason for RVing, but it wouldn't be in the US - the ACA is pushing us out of the states.  So then we again run into issues with importing animals to other countries and visa things (can't settle long).  It's still something we're considering.

I think for now I may just sign up for another year of working.

I'm not positive if it's the same for cats, but apparently it's really easy to travel in Central and South America with dogs, without quarantines etc. I haven't looked into the details myself, but have been following numerous blogs from people traveling with pets (mostly dogs) down the panamerican highway. RVs aren't as common south of Mexico, but it's certainly possible. Also depends on how well your cats travel.


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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #83 on: February 04, 2015, 11:51:47 AM »
I think for now I may just sign up for another year of working.

Why don't you FIRE, but just plan that your first task post FIRE is to rehome the kitties?

Some more thoughts on rehoming:

Good photos and thorough descriptions go a long way.

Summer is kitten season and adult cats don't generally get as much attention. Now is actually a pretty good time for adult cats.

Try not to rehome and then immediately jet off across the ocean. If you find a home, plan to hold your breath for 2-4 weeks to make sure its a good fit. Always stress that if its not working that you want the cats back, they are not to go to the shelter. If they aren't microchipped, you may want to have that done to be sure that they don't get dropped at a shelter.

Some no-kill organizations (like the one I work for) are not official intake facilities, so anyone that calls and wants us to take their animal is pointed toward the county shelter. Its the only reason that we can actually be no-kill; we control our intake by screening the shelter animals for the ones that are adoptable and only take those. That being said, we do bend the rules fairly often and take an occasional animal directly from an owner or someone that found an animal. I'm sure this practice varies widely from group to group. Long story short, just because you get a "no" from a rescue that you think is ideal, doesn't mean that they won't take them in the long run. Keep a dialogue open, ask for their recommendations on rehoming yourself, ask if they will do a "courtesy post" by listing your cats while they continue to reside with you, or see if you can "foster" them until they are adopted.

Offering to pay for their care is awesome and is a huge step, but animal rescue generally has two problems, money and space. Plus, there is the emotional side, the knee-jerk reaction that has shown up on this thread - you are abandoning them. The more time you can spend discussing options with a rescue, the more you can impress upon them that you are trying your very best to do the right thing for these animals. Also, animal rescue is a small community. I know several groups in the surrounding area and we pass animals around on occasion to help each other out. We shift our rabbits to a nearby group, we take kittens that need bottle feeding, etc. If one can't help you, they are the best people to know who else to talk to.

A&R

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #84 on: February 04, 2015, 12:27:54 PM »
And attitudes towards animals are culturally varied.  In Korea they eat dogs.

As an Asian American (who has lived and spent a significant time in Asia), it drives me crazy when people say things like this. Most Asians don't eat dogs. I know plenty of Koreans who love their dogs deeply and consider them family members. I think twenty years ago that sentiment was likely more rare in Asia, but it's not at all uncommon now.

To Arebelspy, I'm glad you're working hard to find a good home for your cats. If you are able to find someone that you are confident will provide them with a good, loving home for the rest of their lives, I think that is a responsible outcome, and you should go on and live your dream of slow traveling the world with your wife. Personally, I could never part from my dog (never had a cat). He's 11 now, and I love him more with each passing day. If the heavens parted and God offered me a deal to have him around for 10 more years but to never be able to travel during that time, I would take it in a heartbeat. But I realize that not everyone feels that way about their animals.

Blonde Lawyer

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #85 on: February 04, 2015, 12:34:57 PM »


The ACA is pushing us out of the states.

[/quote]

Just curious, not looking to start a fight.  Do you not have health insurance?

arebelspy

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #86 on: February 04, 2015, 01:02:28 PM »
I think for now I may just sign up for another year of working.

Why don't you FIRE, but just plan that your first task post FIRE is to rehome the kitties?

That's why we're looking into it now, rather than waiting, to make sure we have time to find a good situation, or we just don't FIRE.  What if we FIRE and then can't find a solution?  Might as well just keep working.

Good ideas on the other organizations.

The ACA is pushing us out of the states.

Just curious, not looking to start a fight.  Do you not have health insurance?

We do.
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starbuck

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #87 on: February 04, 2015, 01:11:54 PM »
Sure, pets get attached to their owners. But we recently adopted an elderly cat whose owner had died and so she'd been at the shelter for several months. She was skittish at first, but she's happy with us now. I think the cats will adapt.

Yes, if it makes you feel any better, your cats will forget all about you once they're settled in their new home. I find it comforting to know that I care about my cats way more than they care about me!

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #88 on: February 04, 2015, 01:53:32 PM »
I'm not a pet person at all, and do not in any way consider a pet to be equal to a child, so I admit that colors my thinking here.  But for those of you saying that you should never ever get a pet if you are not prepared to keep it no matter what for the next 20 years -- there are more animals who need homes than there are homes that want animals.  If I could keep a pet for 5 years, and then something happens that makes it difficult for me to keep it, isn't it better for that animal to have 5 good years, than for it to have never had a good home at all?  Sure, it is best to keep a pet until the end, but there could be some people that are willing to make a short term commitment but not a lifetime commitment.  Seems to me that making it an all-or-nothing type of thing would just serve to make people choose the nothing.  And that would mean even more animals needing homes.

Zikoris

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #89 on: February 04, 2015, 02:19:06 PM »
I'm not a pet person at all, and do not in any way consider a pet to be equal to a child, so I admit that colors my thinking here.  But for those of you saying that you should never ever get a pet if you are not prepared to keep it no matter what for the next 20 years -- there are more animals who need homes than there are homes that want animals.  If I could keep a pet for 5 years, and then something happens that makes it difficult for me to keep it, isn't it better for that animal to have 5 good years, than for it to have never had a good home at all?  Sure, it is best to keep a pet until the end, but there could be some people that are willing to make a short term commitment but not a lifetime commitment.  Seems to me that making it an all-or-nothing type of thing would just serve to make people choose the nothing.  And that would mean even more animals needing homes.

I think it probably makes more sense for those people to foster pets instead of own them. Or adopt very old pets.

My cat will probably live to close to my retirement date (he's almost 11 now and I have another 9-ish years to go), but if he passes early I would not adopt another pet given my circumstances. But I would not keep working even if he lived freakishly long - I would just retire but delay my travel and do other things until then.

Cookie78

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #90 on: February 04, 2015, 02:26:14 PM »
I think it probably makes more sense for those people to foster pets instead of own them. Or adopt very old pets.

My cat will probably live to close to my retirement date (he's almost 11 now and I have another 9-ish years to go), but if he passes early I would not adopt another pet given my circumstances. But I would not keep working even if he lived freakishly long - I would just retire but delay my travel and do other things until then.

This is exactly my plan also. I foster dogs because I don't want the long term commitment involved in adopting. I have one 5 1/2 year old dog of my own and I hope to FIRE in 8-10 years. If my dog is still alive at that point I will travel in such a way that he can come with me. Lucky for me, he loves road trips. If I fell in love with a much older foster dog I'd consider adopting, but I can't make a long term commitment to a pet if I want to travel.

Blonde Lawyer

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #91 on: February 04, 2015, 03:00:01 PM »
"What if we FIRE and then can't find a solution?  Might as well just keep working."

I'm sure you could find some really awesome things to do with your time that aren't working and aren't traveling internationally.  I don't begrudge you for trying to find them a good home though!

MandyM

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #92 on: February 04, 2015, 03:00:35 PM »
Is there a Petsmart near you? There are generally rescue groups in there on the weekends with adoptable animals. Its a good place to go talk to them and get information. Saturday is typically the best day. There are a few big Adopt-a-thon weekends throughout the year which tend to attract a larger grouping of rescues.

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #93 on: February 04, 2015, 03:18:24 PM »
"What if we FIRE and then can't find a solution?  Might as well just keep working."

I'm sure you could find some really awesome things to do with your time that aren't working and aren't traveling internationally.

We enjoy our jobs.  The reason we are quitting is to travel. 

Is there a Petsmart near you? There are generally rescue groups in there on the weekends with adoptable animals. Its a good place to go talk to them and get information. Saturday is typically the best day. There are a few big Adopt-a-thon weekends throughout the year which tend to attract a larger grouping of rescues.

That's a good idea.
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A&R

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #94 on: February 04, 2015, 03:26:33 PM »
I'm not a pet person at all, and do not in any way consider a pet to be equal to a child, so I admit that colors my thinking here.  But for those of you saying that you should never ever get a pet if you are not prepared to keep it no matter what for the next 20 years -- there are more animals who need homes than there are homes that want animals.  If I could keep a pet for 5 years, and then something happens that makes it difficult for me to keep it, isn't it better for that animal to have 5 good years, than for it to have never had a good home at all?  Sure, it is best to keep a pet until the end, but there could be some people that are willing to make a short term commitment but not a lifetime commitment.  Seems to me that making it an all-or-nothing type of thing would just serve to make people choose the nothing.  And that would mean even more animals needing homes.

Just because an animal is not "equal to a child" does not mean the animal does not deserve a lifelong commitment to be loved and cared for. I'm not a fan of the idea of taking on an animal for just a few years of its life. I think you do the animal a huge disservice, especially if you adopt the animal as a cute little puppy or kitty. Puppies and kittens are far more adoptable than adult dogs and cats, and so many older animals are euthanized each year. I see it essentially as taking away that animal's chance to be adopted from the get-go into a home where he/she would be secure in a loving home for a lifetime. I think this mentality really contributes to the idea that animals are disposable. Dogs and cats may not be human, but they still deserve to be treated with dignity and respect.

Just to be clear, the above was definitely not a dig at Arebelspy. I'm sure he's completely aware that it's more difficult to find a forever home for adult animals, and he's not dropping his cats off at a shelter. I may not completely agree with his sentiment, but I give him props for handling the situation with a lot more responsibility than many people would.

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #95 on: February 04, 2015, 03:31:23 PM »
Check out Arizona Animal Welfare League. They are a strictly no-kill shelter. I got my boy Teak from there. He was found wandering around Payson, AZ with an abscess on his neck. Payson put him on the euthanasia list. AAWL went up there, got him, performed surgery, and rehabilitated him for six months. I met him by chance at a local dog-friendly bar that his foster mom took him to one Friday afternoon. He's been my baby boy for about a year and a half now. Yes, I met my dog at a bar. :)

Anyway, AAWL is awesome. They might be able to help you.

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #96 on: February 04, 2015, 07:25:07 PM »

Yes, if it makes you feel any better, your cats will forget all about you once they're settled in their new home. I find it comforting to know that I care about my cats way more than they care about me!

This is simply not true.  My cat loves my Dad to death.  She used to see him weekly the first 5 years of her life.  Then I moved, first to Vegas, then to CA.  She is with me of course.  Now she sees my Dad every 2 years or so..  (3 ? times in the last 5 years?) and each time as soon as he walked in the door she was twining around his legs and pruting at him. 

Mind you that this is a cat that whenever any other stranger / guest walks into the house hided under the bed for an hour after they are gone. 

If you had told me before I moved that the cat would remember my Dad after not seeing him in 2 years and moving across the country I would have said BS.  But then I saw it with my own eyes.  They remember.  I dont know how, but they do. 

MandyM

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #97 on: February 04, 2015, 07:59:16 PM »

Yes, if it makes you feel any better, your cats will forget all about you once they're settled in their new home. I find it comforting to know that I care about my cats way more than they care about me!

This is simply not true.  My cat loves my Dad to death.  She used to see him weekly the first 5 years of her life.  Then I moved, first to Vegas, then to CA.  She is with me of course.  Now she sees my Dad every 2 years or so..  (3 ? times in the last 5 years?) and each time as soon as he walked in the door she was twining around his legs and pruting at him. 

Mind you that this is a cat that whenever any other stranger / guest walks into the house hided under the bed for an hour after they are gone. 

If you had told me before I moved that the cat would remember my Dad after not seeing him in 2 years and moving across the country I would have said BS.  But then I saw it with my own eyes.  They remember.  I dont know how, but they do.
Its not that they forget, but they live in the present. They don't "miss" you because they don't think about the past. At least not in the same way as people.

totoro

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #98 on: February 04, 2015, 08:58:19 PM »
"As an Asian American (who has lived and spent a significant time in Asia), it drives me crazy when people say things like this. Most Asians don't eat dogs. I know plenty of Koreans who love their dogs deeply and consider them family members. I think twenty years ago that sentiment was likely more rare in Asia, but it's not at all uncommon now."


I think the statement that Koreans eat dogs is still accurate.  Most might not, but a significant number of S. Koreans have tried it and it is popular in N. Korea.

In fact, between 30% and 60% of Koreans have tried dog meat.  You couldn't say the same about Canadians.  A very small percentage in South Korea eat it regularly, but dogs are bred for meat in Korea.  In North Korea it is quite common and an official market price has been set by the government. 

Dog meat is a delicacy still in East Timor.  In the past (1979) dog was widely eaten in Hawaii and considered to be of higher quality than pork or chicken. The consumption of domestic dog meat is still commonplace in the Kingdom of Tonga, and has also been noted in expatriate Tongan communities in New Zealand, Australia, and the United States

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog_meat

FYI I also lived and travelled in Asia for an extensive period of time.  I never tried dog, but I was served horse and live fish.

Little Nell

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #99 on: February 04, 2015, 10:27:49 PM »
There may very well be someone who wants a pair of cats for a year or two, but is not ready themselves to make a long term commitment. When we went on an extended (three month) trip abroad, one of our cats moved in with a friend who is a very competent cat person (he had medical issues); the other stayed home with the person who lived in our house. Try for a temporary re-homing, maybe with someone who is planning on FI in a few years and would like to cats for a while.