Author Topic: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets  (Read 36998 times)

Cookie78

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #100 on: February 05, 2015, 10:00:51 AM »
There may very well be someone who wants a pair of cats for a year or two, but is not ready themselves to make a long term commitment. When we went on an extended (three month) trip abroad, one of our cats moved in with a friend who is a very competent cat person (he had medical issues); the other stayed home with the person who lived in our house. Try for a temporary re-homing, maybe with someone who is planning on FI in a few years and would like to cats for a while.

Forwarded this to someone who fits your description exactly

JLee

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #101 on: February 05, 2015, 10:01:34 AM »

Yes, if it makes you feel any better, your cats will forget all about you once they're settled in their new home. I find it comforting to know that I care about my cats way more than they care about me!

This is simply not true.  My cat loves my Dad to death.  She used to see him weekly the first 5 years of her life.  Then I moved, first to Vegas, then to CA.  She is with me of course.  Now she sees my Dad every 2 years or so..  (3 ? times in the last 5 years?) and each time as soon as he walked in the door she was twining around his legs and pruting at him. 

Mind you that this is a cat that whenever any other stranger / guest walks into the house hided under the bed for an hour after they are gone. 

If you had told me before I moved that the cat would remember my Dad after not seeing him in 2 years and moving across the country I would have said BS.  But then I saw it with my own eyes.  They remember.  I dont know how, but they do.
Its not that they forget, but they live in the present. They don't "miss" you because they don't think about the past. At least not in the same way as people.

My cat went crazy when I came home after being gone for a few days. Roommates have told me he also went crazy when I was gone.  Wandering around, meowing, etc.

arebelspy

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #102 on: February 05, 2015, 11:40:27 AM »
There may very well be someone who wants a pair of cats for a year or two, but is not ready themselves to make a long term commitment. When we went on an extended (three month) trip abroad, one of our cats moved in with a friend who is a very competent cat person (he had medical issues); the other stayed home with the person who lived in our house. Try for a temporary re-homing, maybe with someone who is planning on FI in a few years and would like to cats for a while.

Forwarded this to someone who fits your description exactly

Actually that would be pretty amazing, to rehome them for a year or three, then get them back.
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Self-employed-swami

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #103 on: February 05, 2015, 11:59:52 AM »
I really hope that works out :)

Kris

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #104 on: February 05, 2015, 07:07:07 PM »

Yes, if it makes you feel any better, your cats will forget all about you once they're settled in their new home. I find it comforting to know that I care about my cats way more than they care about me!

This is simply not true.  My cat loves my Dad to death.  She used to see him weekly the first 5 years of her life.  Then I moved, first to Vegas, then to CA.  She is with me of course.  Now she sees my Dad every 2 years or so..  (3 ? times in the last 5 years?) and each time as soon as he walked in the door she was twining around his legs and pruting at him. 

Mind you that this is a cat that whenever any other stranger / guest walks into the house hided under the bed for an hour after they are gone. 

If you had told me before I moved that the cat would remember my Dad after not seeing him in 2 years and moving across the country I would have said BS.  But then I saw it with my own eyes.  They remember.  I dont know how, but they do.
Its not that they forget, but they live in the present. They don't "miss" you because they don't think about the past. At least not in the same way as people.

My cat went crazy when I came home after being gone for a few days. Roommates have told me he also went crazy when I was gone.  Wandering around, meowing, etc.

Yeah, I really think it depends on the cat.  I've had many of them in my life, and it's amazing to me how different their personalities have all been. 

MandyM

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #105 on: February 06, 2015, 03:59:33 AM »

Yes, if it makes you feel any better, your cats will forget all about you once they're settled in their new home. I find it comforting to know that I care about my cats way more than they care about me!

This is simply not true.  My cat loves my Dad to death.  She used to see him weekly the first 5 years of her life.  Then I moved, first to Vegas, then to CA.  She is with me of course.  Now she sees my Dad every 2 years or so..  (3 ? times in the last 5 years?) and each time as soon as he walked in the door she was twining around his legs and pruting at him. 

Mind you that this is a cat that whenever any other stranger / guest walks into the house hided under the bed for an hour after they are gone. 

If you had told me before I moved that the cat would remember my Dad after not seeing him in 2 years and moving across the country I would have said BS.  But then I saw it with my own eyes.  They remember.  I dont know how, but they do.
Its not that they forget, but they live in the present. They don't "miss" you because they don't think about the past. At least not in the same way as people.

My cat went crazy when I came home after being gone for a few days. Roommates have told me he also went crazy when I was gone.  Wandering around, meowing, etc.

Yeah, I really think it depends on the cat.  I've had many of them in my life, and it's amazing to me how different their personalities have all been.
You are talking about short term absences. For a rehoming situation, the cat will settle into new surroundings within a few weeks and be fine. I would venture to guess that the adjustment period averages two weeks or less.

Sofa King

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #106 on: February 06, 2015, 08:43:21 AM »
I think people once they commit to a pet should finish the commitment.   

I concur.  But 99% of the time selfishness usually wins out when it comes to being inconvenienced by a pet a person once said that they "loved". 

Sofa King

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #107 on: February 06, 2015, 08:53:31 AM »



Our other option is that we keep them and just stay here in the US for the next decade until they both die.  That is an option we're considering, just because we do love them.

So we're looking into trying to find out how we can find a wonderful new home for them.   If it comes down to it, we'll pay whatever price that entails to make sure they are well cared for.    If we don't find something, we won't be leaving.

Thank you everyone for your suggestions.

I realize that people will disagree with what we are doing, and that's okay.  You're more than entitled to your opinion that I'm a scumbag.  Sitting here next to my sleeping cats, I'm not sure I disagree with you.

Sounds like to me if you have to do something like this you are going about it the rite way IMO. I don't think your a scumbag.

Kris

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #108 on: February 06, 2015, 09:26:26 AM »
So, I have a devil's advocate question for all the people who are saying that once you get a pet, you keep it for life, no exceptions.

I have a friend whose family has one cat, and they recently (about 5-6 months ago) adopted another one. The problem is, that cat #2, though an extremely sweet cat to the family, is mean to cat #1.  Just jumps on and follows around/torments the other cat, who is older and smaller.

So, the solution that the family should choose would be... building another wing in their house for the second cat?  Or what?  Since rehoming the cat isn't an option, what should they do? 

Sofa King

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #109 on: February 06, 2015, 09:37:55 AM »

So, the solution that the family should choose would be... building another wing in their house for the second cat?  Or what?  Since rehoming the cat isn't an option, what should they do?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_FLCHN7jivA

Kris

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #110 on: February 06, 2015, 09:42:31 AM »

So, the solution that the family should choose would be... building another wing in their house for the second cat?  Or what?  Since rehoming the cat isn't an option, what should they do?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_FLCHN7jivA

Are you suggesting that they haven't tried to figure out how to stop them from fighting?

Sofa King

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #111 on: February 06, 2015, 09:48:09 AM »

So, the solution that the family should choose would be... building another wing in their house for the second cat?  Or what?  Since rehoming the cat isn't an option, what should they do?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_FLCHN7jivA

Are you suggesting that they haven't tried to figure out how to stop them from fighting?

Are you suggesting they have tried every possible/realistic solution? 

Kris

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #112 on: February 06, 2015, 09:49:01 AM »

So, the solution that the family should choose would be... building another wing in their house for the second cat?  Or what?  Since rehoming the cat isn't an option, what should they do?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_FLCHN7jivA

Are you suggesting that they haven't tried to figure out how to stop them from fighting?

Are you suggesting they have tried every possible/realistic solution?

Yes, actually I am.

It's easy to assume that someone you don't even know is an irresponsible cat owner who doesn't give a shit and doesn't really try to find a solution before he/she says, "well, this is just so *hard*! Gosh, I just don't know what to do!  I guess I'll just give up."

Their other senior cat is being tormented.  She is a beloved family pet and they are at their wits' end. 

Edited to add:  And one other thing that I think is easy to overlook: if the younger cat is constantly tormenting the older one, that is an indication that the younger cat isn't happy, either.  Why is it better to not consider the possibility that the younger cat needs to be in a home with no other pets, and that rehoming it would be a *good* thing for him?
« Last Edit: February 06, 2015, 09:53:58 AM by Kris »

Sofa King

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #113 on: February 06, 2015, 09:57:16 AM »
  Since rehoming the cat isn't an option, what should they do?


Ummmm.......you DID ask the question toots. LOL!!!!  How about send them this then? In most cases where there a will there is a way. http://jacksongalaxy.com/2014/08/21/aggression-in-cats/?utm_source=jg&utm_medium=fb&utm_term=20150205&utm_campaign=aggression-in-cats 

Blonde Lawyer

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #114 on: February 06, 2015, 11:22:08 AM »
So, I have a devil's advocate question for all the people who are saying that once you get a pet, you keep it for life, no exceptions.

I have a friend whose family has one cat, and they recently (about 5-6 months ago) adopted another one. The problem is, that cat #2, though an extremely sweet cat to the family, is mean to cat #1.  Just jumps on and follows around/torments the other cat, who is older and smaller.

So, the solution that the family should choose would be... building another wing in their house for the second cat?  Or what?  Since rehoming the cat isn't an option, what should they do?

If the new cat is from a shelter then the shelter will usually take the cat back.  You absolutely have to look out for the well being of your pre-existing pet, assuming you have already tried proper integration techniques.

caliq

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #115 on: February 06, 2015, 11:25:37 AM »
So, I have a devil's advocate question for all the people who are saying that once you get a pet, you keep it for life, no exceptions.

I have a friend whose family has one cat, and they recently (about 5-6 months ago) adopted another one. The problem is, that cat #2, though an extremely sweet cat to the family, is mean to cat #1.  Just jumps on and follows around/torments the other cat, who is older and smaller.

So, the solution that the family should choose would be... building another wing in their house for the second cat?  Or what?  Since rehoming the cat isn't an option, what should they do? 

I recently rehomed my third dog (the last one added to our "pack") because the oldest dog was picking fights with her.  And I mean, blood staining my carpet, nearly had to get stitches fights.  And they're both 100 lb Great Danes, female, around the same age, and just maturing into adulthood (so they felt the need to reevaluate their positions).  We tried everything and the fights continued.  My husband and I could barely physically separate them, and neither one of us could do it alone.  We had to make a decision and act on it before one of my dogs ended up dead, or one of us ended up in the hospital with dog bites, which would have put all 3 of my dogs under investigation. 

In a situation like that, it's better for everyone involved to rehome one of the animals.  My third dog is now living with a girl I've been friends with since I was 6 years old, who happens to be a certified dog trainer and works at a doggy daycare, has another dog for her to play with, and lots of land for them to run around.  She's probably happier there than she was at my house, tbh -- she was a little high energy for our lifestyle and being cooped up inside this winter was getting hard for her. 

Making a commitment to an animal for life also means being able to let that animal go if your home isn't working out for them.  However, I think there are very few cases where that exception can be met with a human-oriented reason (pretty much only severe allergies or if you become so disabled you can't even care for yourself).  But, in situations where the animals aren't getting along, your priority should be the animal that you had first OR the animal with special needs that would make it harder for them to find another great home. 

former player

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #116 on: February 06, 2015, 12:19:41 PM »
You are talking about short term absences. For a rehoming situation, the cat will settle into new surroundings within a few weeks and be fine. I would venture to guess that the adjustment period averages two weeks or less.
My neighbour once spent 5 months in hospital, with another neighbour and I feeding her cats.  The longest established cat jumped in the back of the ambulance to greet my neighbour as she came home.

aspiringnomad

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #117 on: February 06, 2015, 12:23:01 PM »
I'm trying to slowly introduce a kitten to my older cat right now. What a frustrating process it's been for all humans and cats involved...If it doesn't turn for the better in a week or two, I'll have to bring the kitten back to the rescue organization. Not at all what I want to do, but sometimes it's the only option.

MandyM

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #118 on: February 06, 2015, 12:36:48 PM »
You are talking about short term absences. For a rehoming situation, the cat will settle into new surroundings within a few weeks and be fine. I would venture to guess that the adjustment period averages two weeks or less.
My neighbour once spent 5 months in hospital, with another neighbour and I feeding her cats.  The longest established cat jumped in the back of the ambulance to greet my neighbour as she came home.

Yes, and I once took a dog from my aunt and uncle (gasp, they rehomed him!). When I took him to visit years later he seemed to genuinely remember them and their home. My point is not that animals forget or that they are not happy to see you again, my point is that my dog was perfectly happy while with me. He didn't sit around dreaming of his old home or his old family.

A major difference between rehoming and your story is that those cats were likely lacking in human companionship. Unless there was someone living in that home during those 5 months, there was a hole that wasn't filled.

MicroRN

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #119 on: February 06, 2015, 12:37:59 PM »
So, I have a devil's advocate question for all the people who are saying that once you get a pet, you keep it for life, no exceptions.

I have a friend whose family has one cat, and they recently (about 5-6 months ago) adopted another one. The problem is, that cat #2, though an extremely sweet cat to the family, is mean to cat #1.  Just jumps on and follows around/torments the other cat, who is older and smaller.

So, the solution that the family should choose would be... building another wing in their house for the second cat?  Or what?  Since rehoming the cat isn't an option, what should they do?

I'm in general a "keep it for life," but it's about doing what's best for the animal.  I looked at rehoming one of my cats a few years back.  She was literally sick from anxiety related to frequent moves.  Since DH is military, the moves weren't optional and I felt she'd be happier with a stable home.  However, during the months I looked to find her a new home, we also put her on Prozac, and even once she came off it the excessive anxiety was controlled.  In the example you gave, you try everything reasonable to integrate the cats, and if it just isn't happening you find one a new home. 

I had a friend with a cat that started getting very aggressive to the family and other pets following the birth of a new baby.  They tried all kinds of behavioral techniques, meds, pheromone sprays with no results.  The only "effective" method was keeping the cat locked up and isolated in the spare bathroom.  They figured that wasn't good for anyone, so they found a co-worker with no kids or other pets who was interested.  Co-worker took the cat home and he turned back into a lovely, mellow pal.  There's a difference between dumping an animal because it's convenient for you and finding it an appropriate home because it's best for the animal. 

MandyM

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #120 on: February 06, 2015, 12:40:13 PM »
I'm trying to slowly introduce a kitten to my older cat right now. What a frustrating process it's been for all humans and cats involved...If it doesn't turn for the better in a week or two, I'll have to bring the kitten back to the rescue organization. Not at all what I want to do, but sometimes it's the only option.

PM me if you would like some advice on this. Also - please talk to the rescue that you got the kitten from. They can likely help you. And in the event that you do have to return the kitten, it is VERY helpful if there is advance notice.

Sofa King

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #121 on: February 06, 2015, 12:51:59 PM »
There's a difference between dumping an animal because it's convenient for you and finding it an appropriate home because it's best for the animal.


I concur! 

Kris

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #122 on: February 06, 2015, 01:44:49 PM »
  Since rehoming the cat isn't an option, what should they do?


Ummmm.......you DID ask the question toots. LOL!!!!  How about send them this then? In most cases where there a will there is a way. http://jacksongalaxy.com/2014/08/21/aggression-in-cats/?utm_source=jg&utm_medium=fb&utm_term=20150205&utm_campaign=aggression-in-cats

Right. Perhaps I should have specified that they have spent the last six months trying everything they can think of (in consultation with their vet) and nothing works.  I assumed oeople would understand the implied "nothing seems to work to get these cats to get along."

Kris

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #123 on: February 06, 2015, 01:49:11 PM »
So, I have a devil's advocate question for all the people who are saying that once you get a pet, you keep it for life, no exceptions.

I have a friend whose family has one cat, and they recently (about 5-6 months ago) adopted another one. The problem is, that cat #2, though an extremely sweet cat to the family, is mean to cat #1.  Just jumps on and follows around/torments the other cat, who is older and smaller.

So, the solution that the family should choose would be... building another wing in their house for the second cat?  Or what?  Since rehoming the cat isn't an option, what should they do? 

I recently rehomed my third dog (the last one added to our "pack") because the oldest dog was picking fights with her.  And I mean, blood staining my carpet, nearly had to get stitches fights.  And they're both 100 lb Great Danes, female, around the same age, and just maturing into adulthood (so they felt the need to reevaluate their positions).  We tried everything and the fights continued.  My husband and I could barely physically separate them, and neither one of us could do it alone.  We had to make a decision and act on it before one of my dogs ended up dead, or one of us ended up in the hospital with dog bites, which would have put all 3 of my dogs under investigation. 

In a situation like that, it's better for everyone involved to rehome one of the animals.  My third dog is now living with a girl I've been friends with since I was 6 years old, who happens to be a certified dog trainer and works at a doggy daycare, has another dog for her to play with, and lots of land for them to run around.  She's probably happier there than she was at my house, tbh -- she was a little high energy for our lifestyle and being cooped up inside this winter was getting hard for her. 

Making a commitment to an animal for life also means being able to let that animal go if your home isn't working out for them.  However, I think there are very few cases where that exception can be met with a human-oriented reason (pretty much only severe allergies or if you become so disabled you can't even care for yourself).  But, in situations where the animals aren't getting along, your priority should be the animal that you had first OR the animal with special needs that would make it harder for them to find another great home.

I agree.   This is why I posted it as a devil's advocate question to people who said that once you get a pet, it's for life.  In my friend's case, she rehomed the newer cat last week to a friend of herd.  From what I've heard, he's doing well, and the senior cat has calmed and is happy to not be tormented anymore. 

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #124 on: February 06, 2015, 03:46:20 PM »
  Since rehoming the cat isn't an option, what should they do?


Ummmm.......you DID ask the question toots. LOL!!!!  How about send them this then? In most cases where there a will there is a way. http://jacksongalaxy.com/2014/08/21/aggression-in-cats/?utm_source=jg&utm_medium=fb&utm_term=20150205&utm_campaign=aggression-in-cats

Right. Perhaps I should have specified that they have spent the last six months trying everything they can think of (in consultation with their vet) and nothing works.  I assumed oeople would understand the implied "nothing seems to work to get these cats to get along."

I know I'm only contributing to the off-topicness, but this The Way of Cats blog is amazing. Yes, there is some anthromorphisation of cats, but I am a complete and utter fan of her approach now. We've had some severe behavioural issues between our two cats, who were previously best friends but that all went to shit after one of them got shaved (and in hindsight exacerbated by the shaved cat also having genetic kidney disease).

Our vet practice has been great, and we've made some progress with medicating and following their suggestions. But, we had a big step change in improvement after just one week of following the suggestions in that blog (I read lots and lots of her blog posts). Given we were thinking we'd have to rehome one of them at one point cos even keeping them separated wasn't working, it's been amazing. Highly recommended, even if the cats in question don't have specific behavioural issues.

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #125 on: February 06, 2015, 05:10:13 PM »
I'm trying to slowly introduce a kitten to my older cat right now. What a frustrating process it's been for all humans and cats involved...If it doesn't turn for the better in a week or two, I'll have to bring the kitten back to the rescue organization. Not at all what I want to do, but sometimes it's the only option.

PM me if you would like some advice on this. Also - please talk to the rescue that you got the kitten from. They can likely help you. And in the event that you do have to return the kitten, it is VERY helpful if there is advance notice.

DCMustichio, feel free to PM me too.  And also look at a couple of my recent posts.  They are about using generic Prozac to help my warring sister cats.  If you haven't already, you may want to talk to your vet about the situation.  The vet may prescribe some temporary chemical assistance to help smooth the introduction of the cats to each other.

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #126 on: February 06, 2015, 05:18:47 PM »
Quote
Losing a job and being forced to move is not a reason to get rid of a pet.  You need to make smarter decisions.  And look for places that take pets.  Pets are a commitment for life.  Period.  Know that going into the pet acquisition process.

No.  Just.  No.

mm1970

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #127 on: February 06, 2015, 05:25:31 PM »

So, the solution that the family should choose would be... building another wing in their house for the second cat?  Or what?  Since rehoming the cat isn't an option, what should they do?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_FLCHN7jivA

Are you suggesting that they haven't tried to figure out how to stop them from fighting?

Are you suggesting they have tried every possible/realistic solution?

Yes, actually I am.

It's easy to assume that someone you don't even know is an irresponsible cat owner who doesn't give a shit and doesn't really try to find a solution before he/she says, "well, this is just so *hard*! Gosh, I just don't know what to do!  I guess I'll just give up."

Their other senior cat is being tormented.  She is a beloved family pet and they are at their wits' end. 

Edited to add:  And one other thing that I think is easy to overlook: if the younger cat is constantly tormenting the older one, that is an indication that the younger cat isn't happy, either.  Why is it better to not consider the possibility that the younger cat needs to be in a home with no other pets, and that rehoming it would be a *good* thing for him?
I have known several people who have had to rehome cats due to this exact situation.  That's how my good friends ended up with 5 cats and my MIL ended up with a cat.

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #128 on: February 06, 2015, 07:33:22 PM »
Arebelspy- I am facing the same dilemma.  My long-term FI dream is to slow-travel the world until I canít do it anymore. And I canít figure out how to make it work with my 2 cats. I wasnít thinking of FI and travel when I adopted them.

Iíve always thought that when you get a pet, you are committed to provide the best care for them for the remainder of their lives. I think that if you can re-home your cats to a good, loving home, you are still providing for them as best you can Ė you arenít scum abandoning your critters or dumping them in a shelter (which is where I found my cats Ė someone else dumped them). Cats will adjust well to a new home if their new people provide them with plenty of love and attention. But if I find my cats a suitable home, I donít know that I could part with them - I know I would always worry and miss them. And the guilt! Iíve had animals all my life; and I know that while cats live in the moment, they are also emotional creatures who have memories, and love, and grieve.  There is no easy choice!

My revised plan is to apply for a resident/retiree visa to a new country Ė probably somewhere in Europe (assuming I can meet income and other requirements), and take my cats along. They would have to go through the travel and quarantine routine just once. They wonít like the change, but they will probably adjust. It wonít be the travel Iíd hoped for; but Iíve always wanted to live in another country.  Itís a compromise that may work Ė I have a couple of years to figure it out.

I hope you find a solution that is good for you and your cats.

arebelspy

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #129 on: February 06, 2015, 09:03:35 PM »
Thanks for the encouraging words Lian.  :)

I am much more hopeful now than when I started the thread; I particularly like the idea of someone temporarily adopting them for a few years.

Some Mustachian who's a few years from FI, wants a pet, but knows they will be traveling in a few years so they don't want to commit to a long term pet situation would be perfect perhaps.  We pay for a lot of the cat's living expenses, and they (the foster parent) gets a win-win situation: pets to enjoy for a few years, at a reduced cost to them (how Mustachian), and then can pass them off when they're FI and want to travel (and give them back, so they know they're going to a good home), and a win-win for us, we get someone to watch our cats for a few years while we travel so we know they're being well cared for, and then get them back.  We'll see if it works out that nicely, but it's a neat concept.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2015, 09:05:44 PM by arebelspy »
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Briarly

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #130 on: February 07, 2015, 09:25:00 AM »
IDK if this could've an option for you but I was able to re home my beloved princesses, uh, cats, at a nearby dairy farm that had a mouse problem. they LOVE it and they do remember me. I was so glad that it worked out.

Annamal

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #131 on: February 07, 2015, 11:33:07 AM »
Thanks for the encouraging words Lian.  :)

I am much more hopeful now than when I started the thread; I particularly like the idea of someone temporarily adopting them for a few years.

Some Mustachian who's a few years from FI, wants a pet, but knows they will be traveling in a few years so they don't want to commit to a long term pet situation would be perfect perhaps.  We pay for a lot of the cat's living expenses, and they (the foster parent) gets a win-win situation: pets to enjoy for a few years, at a reduced cost to them (how Mustachian), and then can pass them off when they're FI and want to travel (and give them back, so they know they're going to a good home), and a win-win for us, we get someone to watch our cats for a few years while we travel so we know they're being well cared for, and then get them back.  We'll see if it works out that nicely, but it's a neat concept.

Just wanted to say this sounds like a fantastic idea (and is a slightly more formal version of giving your cats to family members on a temporary basis which is done by an awful lot of people).

It also means that you aren't limited to folks living near you, in terms of finding the best fit for your cats' personality/living arrangements.

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #132 on: February 07, 2015, 01:06:26 PM »
I really hope that works out!! WE ended up having to re-home my MIL's Peke when she died unexpectedly because I was severely allergic to him.  Also my 4 other dogs were tormenting him so we had to separate when not home & he was not very happy with the whole situation.  Luckily her best friend wanted him but I found out could not afford to take him. We happily paid for everything until he died 8 years later. The up side was that we got to visit whenever we wanted & he was happy to see us but also happy with his home.  This is 1 reason at the age of 60 I will get down to just 1 dog when they naturally die because it is not far to burden our kids with our pets.  1 pet to deal with is fine but no more.  My hubby actually just had to turn down a fantastic job in Hawaii which was a 3 year commitment because of quarantine & the fact that the big guy could not go at all.  Our little old dogs are so neurotic they could not survive a quarantine. There are ways around this but it is not guaranteed so will not take the chance. 

aspiringnomad

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #133 on: February 07, 2015, 01:33:45 PM »
[snip]
« Last Edit: August 24, 2015, 08:34:40 PM by dcmustachio »

A&R

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #134 on: February 09, 2015, 10:32:57 PM »
"As an Asian American (who has lived and spent a significant time in Asia), it drives me crazy when people say things like this. Most Asians don't eat dogs. I know plenty of Koreans who love their dogs deeply and consider them family members. I think twenty years ago that sentiment was likely more rare in Asia, but it's not at all uncommon now."


I think the statement that Koreans eat dogs is still accurate.  Most might not, but a significant number of S. Koreans have tried it and it is popular in N. Korea.

In fact, between 30% and 60% of Koreans have tried dog meat.  You couldn't say the same about Canadians.  A very small percentage in South Korea eat it regularly, but dogs are bred for meat in Korea.  In North Korea it is quite common and an official market price has been set by the government. 

Dog meat is a delicacy still in East Timor.  In the past (1979) dog was widely eaten in Hawaii and considered to be of higher quality than pork or chicken. The consumption of domestic dog meat is still commonplace in the Kingdom of Tonga, and has also been noted in expatriate Tongan communities in New Zealand, Australia, and the United States

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog_meat

FYI I also lived and travelled in Asia for an extensive period of time.  I never tried dog, but I was served horse and live fish.

I certainly wasn't disputing that dog meat is eaten in Asia and other parts of the world (not sure what gave you that impression). My point is that your statement is misleading. The phrase "Koreans eat dogs" is hardly representative of the "attitudes" Koreans have towards dogs and paints a highly inaccurate picture of the place dogs hold in Korean* society.

*I'm referring to South Korea here, as I'm not sure how much choice North Koreans have in their food sources.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2015, 07:53:36 AM by A&R »

couponvan

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #135 on: February 13, 2015, 06:18:25 PM »
We've been trying to adopt a hypoallergenic dog (any age) for the past month.  Let me tell you, it is a total emotional roller coaster!

Frankly I am ready to buy a pet store dog.  At least then when we found a dog we like, we could take it home.  We have a nice home, fenced yard, three kids that would care for a dog, only part-time work so the dog wouldn't be left alone for long periods, financial resources to support the dog, and tons of love to give.  For some reason, we can't seem to be "first" on the internet reply button to get the dog.  The only two dogs we've looked at were already taken by the time we got there. 

The most recent loss was super depressing.  (I don't know how people can handle the ups and downs of adopting human children at this point.) We saw a 1 year old surrender on the internet at our local humane society.  I literally called within 5 minutes after their opening time.  Apparently the first "hold" had gotten there 30 minutes before opening and sat in their parking lot.  (I didn't even know you could do that!) Then they left the poor dog in the shelter for three days - right up until the last hours of their hold!  Penni (the dog) sat in the shelter for three days she didn't need to be there, and this other family already had a dog.... 

I'll just throw it out there that if anyone wants to rehome a dog in the Chicago area and it is hypoallergenic, we are ready to welcome them with open arms!

(That is if we don't succumb to our kids pleading on Valentine's Day and do the unmustachian/unethical thing and buy a dog.....)

caliq

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #136 on: February 13, 2015, 06:22:36 PM »
We've been trying to adopt a hypoallergenic dog (any age) for the past month.  Let me tell you, it is a total emotional roller coaster!

Frankly I am ready to buy a pet store dog.  At least then when we found a dog we like, we could take it home.  We have a nice home, fenced yard, three kids that would care for a dog, only part-time work so the dog wouldn't be left alone for long periods, financial resources to support the dog, and tons of love to give.  For some reason, we can't seem to be "first" on the internet reply button to get the dog.  The only two dogs we've looked at were already taken by the time we got there. 

The most recent loss was super depressing.  (I don't know how people can handle the ups and downs of adopting human children at this point.) We saw a 1 year old surrender on the internet at our local humane society.  I literally called within 5 minutes after their opening time.  Apparently the first "hold" had gotten there 30 minutes before opening and sat in their parking lot.  (I didn't even know you could do that!) Then they left the poor dog in the shelter for three days - right up until the last hours of their hold!  Penni (the dog) sat in the shelter for three days she didn't need to be there, and this other family already had a dog.... 

I'll just throw it out there that if anyone wants to rehome a dog in the Chicago area and it is hypoallergenic, we are ready to welcome them with open arms!

(That is if we don't succumb to our kids pleading on Valentine's Day and do the unmustachian/unethical thing and buy a dog.....)

Put in an application at a good/big rescue -- they usually keep it on file and will call pre-approved adopters that they think are a good match before posting dogs on their websites.

justajane

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #137 on: February 19, 2015, 10:21:17 AM »
We have a 17 year old cat who in many respects probably would have benefited from rehoming. Up until four years ago, we had two cats, but when my childhood cat died at 20+ years, we jumped at the chance to rehome her with my parents. She was the more annoying of our cats, i.e. extremely verbal for most of the day and night. Unfortunately our previously quiet cat learned this type of verbal behavior and now wanders around the house meowing at a very high volume. It's so loud that sometimes I mistake his meowing for the cry of our baby.

I would have never thought that we would be one of those people who resent their pets, but then we had kids. Life changed so much that honestly I do resent one more little creature that I have to clean up after. What ends up happening these days is that he spends most of his time in the basement. We can't let him out, because he is so loud that he wakes the baby up from his naps and wakes us all up at night. This has been going on for the past year. 

I didn't feel comfortable rehoming him with anyone other than my parents, who didn't want two cats. That's why we have this situation in which we have a cat who deserves more affection than he is getting. I do think a commitment to your pet is for their life, but I think in this respect the perfect can be the enemy of the good. Because of this hard line, it is likely that I will never own another pet in my lifetime. The stress that this has put on me (guilt, etc.) means that I will probably never be willing to take on the responsibility again.

I've tried to have the conversation with my mom about their future pets. Their current cat (i.e. our cat) is around 14 years old. I asked her if they would get another cat when she dies. She said yes. My mom is 72 years old. I strongly encouraged her to adopt an older cat the next time around instead of a kitten, because I REALLY REALLY do not want to have to adopt her next one if and when she is no longer able to care for him or her. I might have to take a hard line on this and ask one of my other siblings (one of whom is single) to take on the burden. And yes, I do think of my pet as a burden at this point in my life. I would have never thought I could feel this way about a cat, but this is truly how I feel unfiltered. I feed him and scoop his poop, but I won't lie that in many respects I will be relieved when we are no longer pet owners.

rocksinmyhead

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #138 on: February 19, 2015, 10:39:56 AM »
We have a 17 year old cat who in many respects probably would have benefited from rehoming. Up until four years ago, we had two cats, but when my childhood cat died at 20+ years, we jumped at the chance to rehome her with my parents. She was the more annoying of our cats, i.e. extremely verbal for most of the day and night. Unfortunately our previously quiet cat learned this type of verbal behavior and now wanders around the house meowing at a very high volume. It's so loud that sometimes I mistake his meowing for the cry of our baby.

I would have never thought that we would be one of those people who resent their pets, but then we had kids. Life changed so much that honestly I do resent one more little creature that I have to clean up after. What ends up happening these days is that he spends most of his time in the basement. We can't let him out, because he is so loud that he wakes the baby up from his naps and wakes us all up at night. This has been going on for the past year. 

I didn't feel comfortable rehoming him with anyone other than my parents, who didn't want two cats. That's why we have this situation in which we have a cat who deserves more affection than he is getting. I do think a commitment to your pet is for their life, but I think in this respect the perfect can be the enemy of the good. Because of this hard line, it is likely that I will never own another pet in my lifetime. The stress that this has put on me (guilt, etc.) means that I will probably never be willing to take on the responsibility again.

I've tried to have the conversation with my mom about their future pets. Their current cat (i.e. our cat) is around 14 years old. I asked her if they would get another cat when she dies. She said yes. My mom is 72 years old. I strongly encouraged her to adopt an older cat the next time around instead of a kitten, because I REALLY REALLY do not want to have to adopt her next one if and when she is no longer able to care for him or her. I might have to take a hard line on this and ask one of my other siblings (one of whom is single) to take on the burden. And yes, I do think of my pet as a burden at this point in my life. I would have never thought I could feel this way about a cat, but this is truly how I feel unfiltered. I feed him and scoop his poop, but I won't lie that in many respects I will be relieved when we are no longer pet owners.

I am actually scared I'm going to feel somewhat like this when we eventually have kids... especially because dogs (we have 2, but one is 12 so might not make it 'til we have kids) require even more attention/work than cats :(

justajane

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #139 on: February 19, 2015, 11:02:39 AM »
We have a 17 year old cat who in many respects probably would have benefited from rehoming. Up until four years ago, we had two cats, but when my childhood cat died at 20+ years, we jumped at the chance to rehome her with my parents. She was the more annoying of our cats, i.e. extremely verbal for most of the day and night. Unfortunately our previously quiet cat learned this type of verbal behavior and now wanders around the house meowing at a very high volume. It's so loud that sometimes I mistake his meowing for the cry of our baby.

I would have never thought that we would be one of those people who resent their pets, but then we had kids. Life changed so much that honestly I do resent one more little creature that I have to clean up after. What ends up happening these days is that he spends most of his time in the basement. We can't let him out, because he is so loud that he wakes the baby up from his naps and wakes us all up at night. This has been going on for the past year. 

I didn't feel comfortable rehoming him with anyone other than my parents, who didn't want two cats. That's why we have this situation in which we have a cat who deserves more affection than he is getting. I do think a commitment to your pet is for their life, but I think in this respect the perfect can be the enemy of the good. Because of this hard line, it is likely that I will never own another pet in my lifetime. The stress that this has put on me (guilt, etc.) means that I will probably never be willing to take on the responsibility again.

I've tried to have the conversation with my mom about their future pets. Their current cat (i.e. our cat) is around 14 years old. I asked her if they would get another cat when she dies. She said yes. My mom is 72 years old. I strongly encouraged her to adopt an older cat the next time around instead of a kitten, because I REALLY REALLY do not want to have to adopt her next one if and when she is no longer able to care for him or her. I might have to take a hard line on this and ask one of my other siblings (one of whom is single) to take on the burden. And yes, I do think of my pet as a burden at this point in my life. I would have never thought I could feel this way about a cat, but this is truly how I feel unfiltered. I feed him and scoop his poop, but I won't lie that in many respects I will be relieved when we are no longer pet owners.

I am actually scared I'm going to feel somewhat like this when we eventually have kids... especially because dogs (we have 2, but one is 12 so might not make it 'til we have kids) require even more attention/work than cats :(

It is possible but not inevitable. Some people take the whole transition in stride. Our neighbors have. They bought a second dog when they had a baby. But I have had conversations with several close friends who felt as we did. Honestly, I've noticed more of this sentiment with cat owners, if that's any consolation. Cats are a much longer commitment usually, and my husband just didn't understand this when he adopted two cats in his twenties. Yeah, I blame him ;).

Dogs might be more work, but they are not as MESSY. It's lovely to go on a family stroll with a dog and baby, especially if you have one person to push the stroller and one to hold the leash.

My main worry with dogs would be the safety of the breed and how they would react to a little person in the house.

Retire-Canada

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #140 on: February 19, 2015, 11:30:26 AM »
Our other option is that we keep them.  We don't live our dream of traveling the world, and just stay here in the US for the next decade until they both die.  That is an option we're considering, just because we do love them.  But it is also not ideal, as traveling is our main ER goal, and without it there's not much point of ER for us.  So our considering it is us saying "I guess we can just keep working."  But continuing to work a decade+ past FI  just for the cats also seems a bit silly.

I rescued a cat because the owner was not responsible. I didn't want a cat. It wasn't convenient and it still isn't. I'd be doing a lot more travelling if I didn't have the cat.

Every time I go away from more than 2 days I get a cat sitter because the cat is noticeably happier that way. It costs money or I have to trade a favour.

I've got another 10 years like this most likely.

Personally I look at it like animals are for life. Either man up and look after them [giving them to a shelter isn't doing that even if you pay for the service] or find them a real home yourself that you feel 100% about. Which means finding it yourself, investigating the people and then following up on them afterwards.

You don't love your cats if you then say you want to ditch them because they are interfering with your dreams and looking after them would be a bit silly.

The time to think about that was before you got them.

Now it's time to punch yourself in the face and take care of them.

-- Vik

MicroRN

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #141 on: February 19, 2015, 12:40:06 PM »
I am actually scared I'm going to feel somewhat like this when we eventually have kids... especially because dogs (we have 2, but one is 12 so might not make it 'til we have kids) require even more attention/work than cats :(

I felt that way for a little while, and I know my husband did too.  The good news is, it passed.  It was just during the infant + toddler phase when we were flat out exhausted all the time.  As the kids have gotten older (and they're only 2 and 3.5, not even school age), I don't feel like that anymore.  Babies just suck all your energy for a while.

There are so many good things about having pets with kids too.  My kids learned about using "gentle hands" early on.  They love animals.  Kids with pets in the house are less likely to have allergies.  They're great for kids with autism, which our older son has.  When the children get older, having pets helps teach them responsibility - walking, litterbox, refilling food and water.  I grew up with 4 dogs and a cat, and we walked the dogs every day, rain or shine.  Walking with my parents for half an hour or more every night was a great time to talk and bond.     

rocksinmyhead

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #142 on: February 19, 2015, 01:27:36 PM »
I am actually scared I'm going to feel somewhat like this when we eventually have kids... especially because dogs (we have 2, but one is 12 so might not make it 'til we have kids) require even more attention/work than cats :(

I felt that way for a little while, and I know my husband did too.  The good news is, it passed.  It was just during the infant + toddler phase when we were flat out exhausted all the time.  As the kids have gotten older (and they're only 2 and 3.5, not even school age), I don't feel like that anymore.  Babies just suck all your energy for a while.

There are so many good things about having pets with kids too.  My kids learned about using "gentle hands" early on.  They love animals.  Kids with pets in the house are less likely to have allergies.  They're great for kids with autism, which our older son has.  When the children get older, having pets helps teach them responsibility - walking, litterbox, refilling food and water.  I grew up with 4 dogs and a cat, and we walked the dogs every day, rain or shine.  Walking with my parents for half an hour or more every night was a great time to talk and bond.     

Okay, you and justajane have made me feel better :) We currently walk our dogs every day regardless of weather, too, and I have thought before that this seemed like it would be a good activity with kids. Even with just my boyfriend and me it's a nice time to catch up on each other's days. I grew up with a really small dog so she didn't get walked regularly, just ran around the yard with us.

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #143 on: February 19, 2015, 03:25:39 PM »
I know it is slightly OT, but I had a middle aged dog and old cat when I had my baby.  Cat died a month later (she was very old) so can't say a lot about cats and babies, except that for that one month they loved each other.  Dog and baby, dog and child, just what microRN said.  Our dog was a breed that is known to be very good with children, but also fairly high maintenance.  The baby/child was a lot more maintenance!

We always have to think of what is best for our animals.  I was considering taking in an adult dog (already had one dog of the same breed), but the first weekend she was with us (on probation) I knew it wouldn't work.  She was fascinated by my cat (in a loving way) and would not leave the cat alone.  Poor cat ended up taking refuge in windowsills where the dog could not reach.  Dog had to go back to the original owner.  Nice dog, got along well with my dog, but the cat was not happy.

couponvan

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #144 on: February 19, 2015, 09:42:05 PM »
We've been trying to adopt a hypoallergenic dog (any age) for the past month.  Let me tell you, it is a total emotional roller coaster!

Frankly I am ready to buy a pet store dog.  At least then when we found a dog we like, we could take it home.  We have a nice home, fenced yard, three kids that would care for a dog, only part-time work so the dog wouldn't be left alone for long periods, financial resources to support the dog, and tons of love to give.  For some reason, we can't seem to be "first" on the internet reply button to get the dog.  The only two dogs we've looked at were already taken by the time we got there. 

The most recent loss was super depressing.  (I don't know how people can handle the ups and downs of adopting human children at this point.) We saw a 1 year old surrender on the internet at our local humane society.  I literally called within 5 minutes after their opening time.  Apparently the first "hold" had gotten there 30 minutes before opening and sat in their parking lot.  (I didn't even know you could do that!) Then they left the poor dog in the shelter for three days - right up until the last hours of their hold!  Penni (the dog) sat in the shelter for three days she didn't need to be there, and this other family already had a dog.... 

I'll just throw it out there that if anyone wants to rehome a dog in the Chicago area and it is hypoallergenic, we are ready to welcome them with open arms!

(That is if we don't succumb to our kids pleading on Valentine's Day and do the unmustachian/unethical thing and buy a dog.....)

Put in an application at a good/big rescue -- they usually keep it on file and will call pre-approved adopters that they think are a good match before posting dogs on their websites.

Thank you for the advice!  We put in an application and a $200 pre-adoption fee and just got a rehome 14 month old Maltese.  Of course he was sick the first two days and we ended up with some unmustachian vet expenses, but he's already another kiddo to me. Every time we leave or go to the car he's crazy freaked out.  I think he is afraid he's going to another home. :-(. Then he's just so grateful when we get back to the house!

I think you could maybe find a neighbor on your block that might want them for a period of time - or maybe give one of your renters a discount to care for your cats while you are gone?

shadowmoss

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #145 on: February 20, 2015, 03:28:57 AM »
When my cat died I had decided not to get more as I was traveling for work.  My best friend asked me if I would take her sister's two cats as they had broken out of her house while she was in the hospital (they were declawed), and the neighbor who was feeding them out of the goodness of her heart said they had to go!  The sister was not considered to be able to care for them for the forseeable future (long story...).  I ended up taking them and then getting a part time roomate to take care of the cats and house while I traveled.  Then I took them to WA with me.  Then I decided to go to Honduras for work.  I call my friend and asked if the sister was able to care for the cats again, and the sister said she would be thrilled to get them back.  It worked out for us all, especially the cats.  I needed them big time while I was alone in WA for 2 years.  She needed them back when she was better. 

You might check senior housing apartment complexes for a long-term temporary home.  Especially if you are willing to continue chipping in on the expense of caring for them.  Some folks in senior housing would enjoy the cats, but don't want to adopt at this point in their lives or can't quite afford to care for pets as they would have prior to being on a fixed income.

justajane

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #146 on: February 20, 2015, 05:35:27 AM »
You might check senior housing apartment complexes for a long-term temporary home.  Especially if you are willing to continue chipping in on the expense of caring for them.  Some folks in senior housing would enjoy the cats, but don't want to adopt at this point in their lives or can't quite afford to care for pets as they would have prior to being on a fixed income.

That's a great idea. A lot of senior homes don't take pets, but some of the nicer ones do.

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #147 on: February 20, 2015, 06:21:03 AM »
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Our plan though is to live in a place for 1-3 months, then move to the next country, live there for a bit, and then move on, and so on and so forth.  We plan to travel the world for years.

Awesome, that's my FI plan too!  I'll probably try to get one semester, one class teaching gigs just for fun (we'll see if that part works out, but at least it really just would be for fun and a way to meet more local people.)

On to the cats, here is an idea if you want to try it:  My mom used to bring in tame strays quite a bit which she would place and homes and help people she knows rehome their pets.  She always used the same strategy that involved placing a "free to good home" ad with a description of the pet and the key phrase "will deliver." 

By delivering she got to see not just who was adopting but also where the pet was going.  She wanted to avoid pet hoarders, for example.  I can think of one time when I was with her and she just kept on driving because of the really horrible condition of the home's exterior.  That may seem snooty, but she wanted someone who could and would take care of the animal.  Several times this led to a person with mobility issues who wasn't driving.  Sort of the senior home idea someone else posted, although the people weren't always seniors.  As long as they seemed to have a good system for getting supplies and self care in place (and nothing beats a home visit for determining that) she was fine with those folks.  You can pretty much tell watching someone interact with an animal if it has a good chance of being a good fit.  Harder with cats, who tend to freak out when traveling, but you can observe the person to see if they are understanding of the pets behavior.

Also, and this is as key as the "will deliver" part, she always left her contact information when delivering the pet and asked the people to call her in the next couple of months if there were any problems at all and she would come pick the pet back up.  One dog bounced back once ("too rowdy") and one cat came back from two different homes ("scratched the children").  In both of those cases she was able to find a better fit for the pet.  Most of the time, though, she felt really good about the home where the pet was going when she delivered it and she never got a retrieval call.  A couple of years ago I was able to home a cockatiel we found outside with this method and I was extremely happy with where the bird went (a couple who had one other bird who was obviously being babied.)

The drawback of my mom's method is that she had to deal with a lot of bozos who contacted her (and I had to deal with some crazy bird people when I placed the bird ad.)  The vet where I took the bird to be checked the day I found it said to say it was found but not describe what the bird looked like in the ad, and this seemed counter-intuitive but turned out to be good advice since I was at first trying to find the original owner of a lost bird, not someone who just wanted a free bird to sell as apparently some birds are quite expensive.  Mom wouldn't even consider going somewhere if the person didn't ask what the pet looked like.  She was also skeptical if she had more than one pet and people wanted both but didn't ask for a description of them, as in the situation where she had two cats who had been living in her work warehouse.  That is what makes your situation even more difficult because not many people want two new cats at once, although I adopted two adult cats at once myself so there's your counterpoint :-)

Good luck with finding them a home, ars!  It is a very slow process, but it sounds like you have plenty of time and if you are persistent you will find a situation that you are very happy with.  I had a friend find a home for her cat when they were moving to Hawaii because of the quarantine issue.  Another friend who moved to Europe had to quarantine her cat for some ridiculous time like 3 months, and she said it was horrible for the cat.  I think that you are being very responsible with the way you are going about this, so just hang in there and you'll find an awesome set up for the cats!

3okirb

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #148 on: February 20, 2015, 07:13:37 AM »
"As an Asian American (who has lived and spent a significant time in Asia), it drives me crazy when people say things like this. Most Asians don't eat dogs. I know plenty of Koreans who love their dogs deeply and consider them family members. I think twenty years ago that sentiment was likely more rare in Asia, but it's not at all uncommon now."


I think the statement that Koreans eat dogs is still accurate.  Most might not, but a significant number of S. Koreans have tried it and it is popular in N. Korea.

In fact, between 30% and 60% of Koreans have tried dog meat.  You couldn't say the same about Canadians.  A very small percentage in South Korea eat it regularly, but dogs are bred for meat in Korea.  In North Korea it is quite common and an official market price has been set by the government. 

Dog meat is a delicacy still in East Timor.  In the past (1979) dog was widely eaten in Hawaii and considered to be of higher quality than pork or chicken. The consumption of domestic dog meat is still commonplace in the Kingdom of Tonga, and has also been noted in expatriate Tongan communities in New Zealand, Australia, and the United States

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog_meat

FYI I also lived and travelled in Asia for an extensive period of time.  I never tried dog, but I was served horse and live fish.

I certainly wasn't disputing that dog meat is eaten in Asia and other parts of the world (not sure what gave you that impression). My point is that your statement is misleading. The phrase "Koreans eat dogs" is hardly representative of the "attitudes" Koreans have towards dogs and paints a highly inaccurate picture of the place dogs hold in Korean* society.

*I'm referring to South Korea here, as I'm not sure how much choice North Koreans have in their food sources.

You're actually both right in a way.  The difference is that people have "meat dogs" and "domestic dogs".  They aren't viewed the same. 

Here's a wikipedia "article" about the breed if you're interested.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nureongi

arebelspy

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #149 on: February 20, 2015, 10:05:00 AM »
I think that you are being very responsible with the way you are going about this, so just hang in there and you'll find an awesome set up for the cats!

Thanks.  I hope so.  We aren't doing anything until we do.  :)
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